Blog Archives

How Donald Duck & Dumbo Helped to Win the War

Just one day after Pearl Harbor, Walt Disney received his first military contract and began creating promotional reels, war bond advertisements, short training and instructional films, and other WWII materials.  Also at this time, he received requests from military units all over the world requesting Disney-designed insignia’s and mascots.

David Lesjak, a former employee and Disney historian says, “Insignia helped build morale.  Having a cartoon character you grew up with on your plane or shoulder patch helped remind you of home.  In my mind it was a happy diversion from the horrors of war.”

Hank Porter @ Disney

One of the purest expressions of Walt Disney’s genuine patriotism during the war years was his decision to establish a unit devoted to producing customized military unit insignia free of charge for U.S. armed forces and their allies.  Headed by the talented draftsman, Hank Porter, whom Walt referred to as a “one-man department,” a unit of 5 full-time artists worked steadily throughout the war, turning out 1,300 insignia.

By far, the single most requested and used Disney character was Donald Duck, who was featured in at least 146 designs.  The numerous requests for Donald’s likeness resulted in a wealth of drawings that successfully channeled his irascibilty as patriotism and military zeal, often with a comedic flourish.

Next, the character that appeared most was Pluto in about 35.  Pluto was popular and his trademark facial expressions made it easy for the artists to incorporate him into a variety of insignia.  Goofy followed in popularity at 25 insignia and Jiminy Cricket appeared in 24.

B-29 Thumper nose-art

Sometimes a unit had a special design in mind and was seeking a Disney artist’s skill to bring it to life, attaching a rough sketch to their request letter for reference.

The bulk of insignia were designed for Army units and Navy vessels, but occasionally individuals requested their own personal design.  These requested were accommodated and executed with the same level of care as an insignia for an entire ship, bombardment group or battalion.

Mickey nose-art

The requested letters were often addressed simply: Walt Disney, Hollywood, California.  Once a letter was received in was placed in the queue of pending requests, and the turnaround time was usually 3-4 weeks, though a wait of several months was possible when the insignia unit was particularly swamped.

The procedure for the creation of the insignia design varied, but it typically involved a preliminary pencil drawing in which the image was established, then a full-color pencil version and finally a full-color gouache on art board that would then be forwarded to the requesting unit or party.  This would often hang in the unit headquarters and serve as a template for reproducing the emblem on aircraft, tanks, and other military equipment – as well as uniforms and letterheads.

War Bond by Disney

It is difficult today to fully appreciate how it felt for a serviceman to have his unit represented by a Disney-designed insignia.  For the generation that fought WWII, Disney character images possessed and iconic heft that has no analog in contemporary animation.

A Donald Duck insignia boosted morale, not just because it reminded soldiers of home, but also because it signified that the job they were doing was important enough to be acknowledged by Walt Disney.

The 127th Airborne Engineers/11th Airborne Division’s first insignia was Donald Duck with combat engineer equipment and aviation goggles.

This article and information was printed in the “Voice of the Angels” 11th Airborne Division Association newspaper.

Click on images to enlarge.

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Military Humor – 

Tracking Guide

Disney Humor

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Farewell Salutes – 

John Bradshaw III – E. Greenwich, RI; US Army, WWII & Korea. Major (Ret. 45 y.)

Jimmie Calder – Pensacola, FL; US Navy, WWII / US Air Force, MSgt. (Ret. 22 y.)

Charles Graybeal – W. Jefferson, NC; US Army, WWII, ETO

Charles Hankammer – San Francisco, CA; US Navy, WWII, CSG2 cook

Clayton J. Horne – Atlanta, LA; Saudi Arabia, Specialist, 351/160th Military Police Battalion, KIA

Meredith Keirn – Niagara Falls, NY; USMC, WWII, PTO, Spl. / Korea, Sgt., Co F/2/7/1st Marine Division, KIA

Ralph Mayville – Windsor, CAN; RC Forces, WWII, ETO, 1st Special Forces (Black Devils)

Horace Ogle – Whangarei, NZ; RNZ Air Force # 44071, WWII

George Rash – Pulaski County, VA; US Army, WWII, POW / Korea

Martin J. Wurth –  Paducah, KY; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 11th Airborne Division

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CHRISTMAS DAY

TO ALL THOSE THAT BELIEVE IN FREEDOM AND PEACEMERRY CHRISTMAS!!  FROM: PACIFIC PARATROOPER!!

PLEASE… REMEMBER THOSE THAT FOUGHT FOR US IN THE PAST

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AND THOSE WHO CONTINUE TO PROTECT US TODAY!!!

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AND FOR THOSE SPECIAL PEOPLE WHO WAIT PATIENTLY AT HOME

 

TO ALL THOSE WHO DO NOT CELEBRATE THIS HOLIDAY … I WISH YOU THE WARMTH AND PEACEFUL CONTENTMENT THAT IS REPRESENTED BY THIS SEASON !!!

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Military Humor –

Humor from deployed Marines

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Gerard Azemar – Lafayette, LA; US Army, WWII

Dick Bowersox – Tiffan, OH; US Merchant Marines, WWII

Darrell Dilks – Temple, OK; US Army, WWII, 2 Bronze Stars

Merlin Hicks – Iron Mountain, MI; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 11th Airborne Division

Dwight “Bud” Hudson – Berry, AL; US Navy, WWII, PTO, gunner’s mate, USS Charrette

J.B. Jones Sr. – Miami, FL; US Army, Korea, Purple Heart

Albert Kane – Dallas, TX; US Navy, WWII, Fireman 1st Class, KIA (Pearl Harbor)

Margaret McKillop – Port Austin, MI; US Army WAC, WWII

Karl Peterson – Warren, PA; US Army, WWII, ETO, 461st Antiaircraft Batt./69th Infantry Division, Communications Tech.

Jack Schultz – Laguna Hills, CA; USMC,Korea & Vietnam, Major (Ret. 21 y.)

John T. Williams – Windsor, VT; US Army, Korea

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Home Front – Wartime recipes (2)

From: The 1940’s Experiment .

We discussed rationing and we’ve discussed just how well our parents and grandparents ate – despite the rationing and time of war when all the “good” stuff was going overseas!  So …. as promised, here are some more of the wonderful recipes from the 1940’s.

Please thank Carolyn on her website for putting these delicious meals on-line!

Recipe 31: Farmhouse Scramble (version 1)

Recipe 32: Cottage Pie

Recipe 33: Potato and Cheese Bake

Recipe 34: Boeuf Bourguignon 1940s Rations Style

Recipe 35: Potato Floddies

Recipe 36: Bread and Apple Pudding

Recipe 37: Danish Apple Pudding

Recipe 38: Vegetable Stew

Recipe 39: Wartime Welsh Cakes

Recipe 40: Cold meat pasties

Recipe 41: Quick chocolate icing

Recipe 42: Potato Rarebit

Recipe 43: Mock Cream Recipe 2

Recipe 44: No Cook Chocolate Cake

Recipe 45: Mince Slices

Recipe 46: Marmite Mushrooms (a modern creation?)

Recipe 47: Eggless Fruit Cake

Recipe 48: Potato and Carrot Pancakes

Recipe 49: Potato and Lentil Curry

Recipe 50: Mock Goose

Recipe 51: Wartime Eggless Christmas Cake

Recipe 52: Vegetable and Oatmeal Goulash

Recipe 53: Irish Soda-Bread

Recipe 54: Eggless Pancakes

Recipe 55: Carrot Cookies

Recipe 56: Herby Bread

Recipe 57: Poor Knight’s Fritters

Recipe 58: Eggless Mayonnaise

Recipe 59: Split pea soup

Recipe 60: Potato Fingers

Being it’s the Holiday Season, I’ll steal 2 more from Carolyn :

Recipe 102: Eggless christmas pudding

Recipe 157: Ministry of Food Christmas Cake

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Military Humor –

Survivalist, Best Before end of the world

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Daniel E, Baker – Tremont, IL; USMC, Cpl., KIA

James M. Brophy – Staatsburg, NY; USMC, Major, KIA

Maximo A. Flores – Surprise, AZ; USMC, SSgt., KIA

Kevin R. Herrmann – New Bern, NC; USMC, Lt. Colonel, KIA

Don Jennings – Martinsburg, WV; US Navy, WWII, Aviation Machinist Mate

Harold Kaplan – Newburgh, NY; US Air Force, 374th Tac Hospital & 6407th USAF Hospital, psychologist

Tom Knibbs – Boca Raton, FL; US Air Force, Vietnam, Captain, pilot

Jahmar F. Resilard – Miramar, FL; USMC, F/A-18 pilot, Captain, KIA

William C. Ross – Hendersonville, TN; USMC, Cpl., KIA

Aubrey Venable – Rustburg, VA; USMC, WWII

Marines lost 5 December 2018

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U.S. Marine Corps Birthday

The Marine Corps Birthday is on November 10 and celebrates the establishment of the US Marine Corp in 1775.

The day is mainly celebrated by personnel, veterans, or other people related to the Marine Corps. Usually, it is marked with a Marine Corps Birthday Ball with a formal dinner, birthday cake, and entertainment. The first ball was held in 1925.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AWDdC-D68Uo

The United States Marine Corps is the US Armed Forces’ combined-arms task force on land, at sea, and in the air. It has more than 180,000 active duty personnel as well as almost 40,000 personnel in the Marine Corps Reserves.

SHAKE THE HAND OF A MARINE TODAY!!

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USMC Humor – 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Nickolas Alba – Kyle, TX; USMC, Purple Heart

Robert Bailey – Fort Wayne, IN; USMC, Korea, Purple Heart

Herbert Carlson – Hartford, CT; USMC, WWII, PTO

John ‘Dan” Driscoll – Frisco City, AL; USMC

Joseph Ehrenberger – Charlotte, NC; USMC, WWII & Korea

David Gates – Edwardsville, WY; USMC, Sgt., Fighter Attack Squadron 312

Jack Hamblin – Pittsburgh, PA; USMC, Korea

Roger Lagace – Manchester, CT; USMC, Cpl.

William Milovich – Cowpens, SC; USMC, WWII, PTO

Francis Morris – OK; Womens USMC, WWII

William Soderna – Deerton, MI; USMC, 5th Div/27th Marines, Japan Occupation

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Tarawa Tribute – Eye Witness Account – Intermission Story (17)

USMC on Tarawa Atoll

Gradually, those buried on Betio in the Tarawa atoll are being identified and returned home.  Pacific Paratrooper is including this story as a tribute to them.

Edwin Glasberg, 93, has lived an extraordinary life and is known as a WWII hero for a number of reasons. He was born on the 14th may, 1924, in Boston and as soon as he was able, he left school and enlisted in the Marines. He was assigned to C Company, 1st Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 2nd Division.

Edwin Glasberg, USMC

War broke out and he was sent to the Western Pacific where he first used his weapon in anger. He was one of the 18,000 Marines that made up the first wave that landed on the Island of Tarawa. There was no significant resistance on the beach, as the Navy had shelled the Japanese positions before the Marines landed, and his company ran up the beach sheltering behind a four foot high wall. From that point on the battle became increasingly bloody as the Japanese detachment of 4,500 men fought back.

Japanese snipers had been positioned in the trees and picked off the American forces at will. Glasberg spotted a sniper hidden in a coconut tree and dashed to the foot of the tree. Pressing his body against the trunk, where he was safe as the machine gun could not be pointed straight down, he noticed a wounded lieutenant, but Glasberg could not reach him as that would place him in the line of fire.  Blazing hot, spent cartridge shells rained down on his head as the Japanese sniper maintained fire at the American forces, so Glasberg simply pointed his rifle straight up and started shooting. He could not see the sniper but as the firing from the top of the tree stopped he could only assume that he had shot the sniper, “I don’t know if I hit him or somebody else did, but he stopped firing. I wasn’t going to climb up to find out.”

USMC on Betio, Tarawa Atoll

The battle raged on and Glasberg, in the company of several Marines, was on manoeuvres when a Japanese soldier leaped out from behind a wood pile and bayoneted Glasberg in the right thigh. “I didn’t realize I got bayoneted,” he said. “You’re so excited, you don’t feel anything.” The Marine in line behind him took out his pistol and shot the enemy soldier in the head. Despite a bleeding wound in his leg, Glasberg remained in the fight.

His next major battle was during the invasion of Saipan. He was part of the contingency that were fighting for Hill 101 and part way up the hill he was wounded for the second time when a bullet grazed the left side of his head. He was awarded his second Purple Heart for this injury and was shipped back to the USA, where he was deployed at the submarine base at Portsmouth on the East Coast.

Soon, he was back in the thick of things when he was part of the boarding party that took control of a German submarine, U-805, that had been forced to surrender. Glasberg was woken in the early hours of 12th May 1945 and ordered to take his rifle, ammunition, and other combat paraphernalia and to report for duty. He had been selected as his file indicated that he spoke German.

Riding in a Navy tender, he and the other six members of the boarding party travelled 25 miles into the Atlantic where they came upon a surreal sight. There lay a German U-Boat on the surface surrounded by six destroyers. The boarding party climbed aboard and in his best schoolboy German, Glasberg yelled, “Alle deutschen Krauts, raus und schnell!” (All you Germans, get out, and fast!) Waving the machine gun in their faces encouraged the German crew to leave quickly, and Glasburg turned to the submarine skipper, Korvettenkapitan Richard Bernardelli. He told the captain, who spoke English, “We’re Marines, not murderers. We’re not going to kill you guys. If the tables were turned, you’d kill us, but we’re not going to do that to you.

All 31 of the crew were captured, and Glasberg used his fluency in German to look through the papers that were found in the captain’s cabin.   “I went to the captain’s quarters. We went through all their maps, and I read them in German, the detailed instructions of their combat patrol. I read the German report. They had sunk three of our ships on their patrol, one off of Nova Scotia, and two in the Saint Lawrence estuary.”

The submarine was then towed to Portsmouth harbor; a trip Glasberg does not remember with any fondness, “I stayed up in the conning tower because the submarine is so musty. You can hardly breathe in it. Plus I got seasick because a submarine on the surface, it’s bobbing up and down in the Atlantic swells.”

Edwin Glasberg, 2010

After the war, Glasberg lived in Massachusetts where he founded a company making hairbrushes. He married, and his wife bore them three daughters.  Glasberg, now 93 years old, is a proud member of the Naples Marine Corps League, and can often be found recounting stories of his life as a marine during WWII at League meetings.

When you come to think of it,” he said, “not too many Marines in World War II were intermingled in combat with both the Germans and the Japanese,” was his last word.

Story is from War history Online.  Pictures are from the Marine Corps League of Naples, FL. and the Marine Corps Association.

Click on images to enlarge.

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Current News – 

SHOUT OUT !!!

I located this article in “The Week” news magazine – is this what our children do (or learn) in college? !!

calling for a ban on veterans as college students!

Cy Forrest was kind enough to send us a link to the University’s reply to this letter.  I hope the PC people make a note of paragraph # 4.

http://pressreleases.uccs.edu/?p=3424

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Military Humor – 

 

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Farewell Salutes –

Phyllis Birney – Baltimore, MD; civilian employee US Army & Air Force (Ret.)

Beatrice Carroll – Hull, ENG; British Navy WREN, WWII

Werner Eisenmann – Pennsburg, PA; US Army, 11th Airborne Division

Howard Falcon Jr. – Evanston, IL; US Navy, WWII, PTO & CBI, USS Robinson

James Guglielmoni – Prescott, AZ; US Navy, WWII, destroyer escort

Frank Hurst – Broad Channel, NY; US Navy, WWII

Vivian King – New Plymouth, NZ; RNZ Army # 42512, WWII, Sgt., 27th Battalion, POW

Richard Palmer – Bronx, NY; USMC, Korea

Bernard Sulisz – So.Lyon, MI; US Army Air Corps, WWII

George Totoiu – Oberlin, OH; US Air Force

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Navajo Code Talkers Day

977177navajo1

During WWI, the Choctaw language had been used to transmit U.S. military messages. With this thought in mind, Philip Johnston, the son of a missionary grew up on a Navajo reservation and spoke the Diné tongue fluently, brought the suggestion of a similar code to General Clayton Vogel early in 1942. The Diné language has no alphabet, uses no symbols and one sound may hold an entire concept. The idea was tested and proved to be faster and more reliable than the mechanized methods. The language has more verbs than nouns, that helps to move the sentences along and makes it far more difficult for outsiders to learn – making it the most ingenious and successful code in military history.

platoon

The 382nd Platoon, USMC

The original class, the 382d Platoon, Navajo Communication Specialists, USMC, developed their code at Camp Pendleton. Once a unit of code talkers were trained, they were put on Marine rosters around the Pacific Theater. Even under severe combat conditions, they remained the living codes, since nothing was ever written down. During the first 48 hours of Iwo Jima, 800 transmissions were coded. These few men became warriors in their own right during some of the worst battles of the war.

Choctaw Code Talkers

Choctaw Code Talkers

Some examples of the English word/ Navajo sound/ literal translation:

Alaska………. Beh-hga……….. with winter
America……….Ne-he-mah……… our mother
Britain……….Toh-ta………… between waters
Australia……..Cha-yes-desi…….rolled hat
China…………Ceh-yehs-besi……braided hair
France………..Da-gha-hi……….beard

Navajo code talkers

The existence of the code talkers and their accomplishments would remain top secret according to the U.S. government and use their expertise in the Korean War. Unfortunately, this resulted in many of the men not receiving the recognition they deserved. I was very lucky to have grown up knowing their story thanks to Smitty, my father.

President Ronald Reagan designated 14 August as National Code Talkers Day in 1982.

Click on images to enlarge.

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Farewell Salutes – 

Rocco Addeo Sr. – Brooklyn, NY; US Navy, WWII, 7th Fleet

Daniel Bolinski – Shamokin, PA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, Korea/POW

Navajo Code Talker's Monument, Window Rock, AZ

Navajo Code Talker’s Monument, Window Rock, AZ

Philip Cooke – Brisbane, AUS; RA Air Force & RAF, WWII

Edward Flora – South Bend, IN; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 11th Airborne Division

John Guardino Sr. – Boca Raton, FL; USMC, Korea

Delbert Latta – Bowling Green, OH; US Army/USMC, WWII, (US Congressman)

Charles McCaughan – Darfield, NZ; RNZ Army # 40553, WWII

Merle Sargent – Springville, UT; US Army, WWII, PTO

James Sinclair – Bosman, CAN; RC Army, WWII, ETO, 17th Firld Reg/Royal Reg. of Canadian Artillery

Donald Weaver – Wayne City, IL; US Navy, WWII, PTO

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Current News – Chesty Puller’s Home

Chesty Puller USMC

Chesty Puller USMC

SALUDA, Va. — Some Marine veterans are on a mission to purchase the former home of one of the Marine Corps’ most revered generals.

When the group found out that Lt. Gen. Lewis Burwell “Chesty” Puller’s retirement home inSaluda had hit the market, they scrambled to both form a nonprofit and launch a GoFundMe site to raise the $400,000 needed to purchase it.

By contributing to help fund the purchase, former intelligence Marine Sgt. Maleesha Kovnesky, who is spearheading the effort as chair of the nonprofit, said supporters will be directly contributing to a place that will serve as a standing monument to other Marines.

“It’s the perfect place, perfect opportunity and perfect time to make sure there’s a place that fosters camaraderie (so) all Marines everywhere know they have a place to go and people who care,” she told Marine Corps Times.

Puller, who died in 1971 at the age of 73, had one of the most distinguished careers in the Marine Corps. He earned five Navy Crosses over his 37 years of service as well as many other combat decorations, campaign medals and unit commendations. He retired as a lieutenant general in 1955, but his legacy lives on, said Kovnesky, who served as an intel Marine and left the Corps in 2000.

The vets hope the 2,253 square-foot suburban house, built in the 1920s, becomes a self-funding venture over the years, with plans to hold events such as weddings, reunions and promotion or retirement ceremonies on the Puller grounds.

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“The intent of the house is to have a place for Marines to gather,” Kovnesky said. “It’s going to be a place available to Marines, kind of like a home base: If they can’t find anywhere to go, they’ll always have this.”

The group is running against the clock, however, to compete with other offers on the house. The Marine vets are also in the process of acquiring a bed and breakfast next door to the Puller family home, and the combined seven acres and nine bedrooms between the two properties could serve as a place of refuge for veterans in need, in addition to a venue for Marine events, according to the group.

“This will be a cultural point of reference for Marines to make sure something as iconic as Chesty Puller’s home does not fall by the wayside” said Anthony Pino, a former captain who worked as an air intel officer and now serves as the vice chairman of the nonprofit. “If it’s going to be saved for anything, it should be put to use for Marines.”

The drive to acquire the home is not just out of nostalgia for the general, however.

Pino recently lost a Marine friend, which prompted the group to seek practical means of reaching out and assisting fellow Marines.

In a suicide note posted on Facebook, Pino’s friend implored Marines to love and to take care of each other.

“His last line was ‘the door is unlocked,’ and so this is our attitude,” Pino said. “The idea that [Chesty’s] home would be used well before anyone ever gets to that point to take care of other Marines, I think that would make him happy.”

The group sees this as the natural continuation of Chesty Puller’s legacy.

Lewis Burwell Puller Jr., the Marine general’s less-well-known son, was severely wounded by a mine while serving as a lieutenant in Vietnam. He lost both legs and parts of his hands, and Chesty broke down sobbing when seeing him for the first time in the hospital.

On May 11, 1994, Lewis Puller Jr. died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

“Chesty was a human being just like the rest of us — he’s still with us and still helping people like he always did; he was a Marine’s Marine, and always looking out for the E-3 who needed help,” said board member and retired Gunnery Sgt. Teresa Carpenter. “This is not a bunch of hair-brained Marines getting together, drinking and saying ‘Hey, let’s buy Chesty Puller’s house!’ We’ve really sat down, talked this through and really worked on it.”

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The group has been able to provide earnest money for the home, but the immediate need is to secure funding to purchase it.

This last week they achieved the status of a pending nonprofit, which Pino said allows them to legally operate in good faith. They are currently working to open an account with a local bank to facilitate the purchase.

Pino said it feels like the group has “been building the plane while flying it,” but that they are committed to realizing its vision.

“We’re at the point now where we’re running the risk of the seller pulling out and going with someone else if we can’t produce soon,” Pino said. “We want to do this the right way.”

The property is currently selling for $395,000 and previously sold in February 2007 for $315,000, according to its listing on Zillow.

This information is from USA Today.

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Chesty Puller Humor – 

chesty2

  1. During one such conflict a ROK (Republic of Korea) commander, whose unit was fighting with the Marines, called legendary Marine (then Colonel) Chesty Puller to report a major Chinese attack in his sector.

    “How many Chinese are attacking you?” asked Puller.

    “Many, many Chinese!” replied the excited Korean officer.

    Puller asked for another count and got the same answer: “Many, many Chinese!”

    “#*#&*!#%!” swore Puller, “Put my Marine liaison officer on the radio.”

    In a minute, an American voice came over the air: “Yes, sir?”
    “Lieutenant,” growled Chesty, “exactly how many Chinese you got up there?”

    “Colonel, we got a whole ****load of Chinese up here!”

    “Thank God!” exclaimed Puller, “At least there’s someone up there who knows how to count!”

    Semper Fi,

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Farewell Salutes – 

Harold Abbott – Columbia, SC; USMC, WWII, Korea, Vietnam, Gunnery Sgt (ret.)

Rhea Adams – South. Shores, NC; USMC, WWII, PTO

Gerard Cullen – Boston, MA; USMC, Korea

William Donovan Jr. – Quincy, MA; USMC, Afghanistan, 2 Purple Hearts

Harry Hagaman – Grand Junction, CO; USMC (Ret. 32 years), Korea, Vietnam, BrigGeneral

Susumu Ito – Wellesley, MA; US Army, WWII, ETO, 442 RCT, Lost Battalion Rescue, Congressional Gold Medal

John Jones – Wichita, KS; USMC, WWII

Manuel Martin Jr. – Fall River, MA; USMC, Korea, Vietnam, Purple Heart, Sgt. Major (Ret. 30 years)

Sheldon Sachs – Rochester, NY; USMC, WWII, PTO

Harold Swindell – Amarillo, TX; USMC, Korea, Vietnam, Captain (Ret. 30 years)

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National Dog Day(s)

OUR MILITARY WORKING DOGS

'Scoop' - Stars & Stripes mascot in Korea Sept. 1950

‘Scoop’ – Stars & Stripes mascot in Korea Sept. 1950

Whether battle-trained or just loyal, man’s best friend has been photographed following troops into battle since the Civil War. And just like the changes in tactics through the years, the relationship between servicemembers and canine companions has evolved through training, on the battlefield, and how they’re used back home.

With wagging tales and slobbering kisses, dogs now help assimilate servicemembers to life away after returning home — something Stars and Stripes has documented several times in the twilight of the United States’ most recent conflicts.

Smedley Butler - USMC, San Diego facing his Drill Sgt.

Smedley Butler – USMC, San Diego facing his Drill Sgt.

In celebration of National Dog Day, here’s a look back at the dogs that have greeted, helped and stayed by their best friends during the most trying times.

 tibbetts.meredith@stripes.com
For a video about working dog, trained by veterans – for veterans______
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Military Dog Humor – eb41315790d1b4cd9f364661285535e5

dog-humor

 

 

DvilDog1

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Farewell Salutes – 

Albert Boverio – San Jose, CA; US Army, WWII, ETO, 95th Field Artillery Battalion

Chester Carter – NY & NC; US Army, WWII, ETOBaby on tombstone.jpg Those left behind.

Milton Frederick – W> AUS; RA Army, WWII

Desmond Knauf – Rotorua, NZ; RNZ Navy #NZ3354, WWII

Henry Lee – Wichita, KS; US Army Air Corps, WWII

Frank Peterson Jr. – Stevensville, MD; USMC, Korea & Vietnam [1st Black Marine pilot]

Matthew Roland – Lexington, KY; US Air Force, Afghanistan, 21/23 Special Tactics Squadron, Captain

Forest Sibley – Pensacola, FL; US Air Force, Afghanistan, Special Operations, SSgt.

William Owen Young – Burma & CAN; Royal Bombay Sappers & Miners, WWII, 411 Parachute Squadron

Frank Zimmerman Jr. – Gresham, OR; US Army, WWII, PTO, Bronze Star, Purple Heart

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We Call Him Chesty

Chesty Puller

Chesty Puller

 

A strong name and a “man’s man” known by some and should be honored by all, is talked about by Mustang on his Fixed Bayonets site. Come join the rest of us in reading about Chesty Puller, USMC.

Fix Bayonets!

In my younger years, conventional parents and teachers encouraged boys and girls to read stories written about famous Americans.  I recall reading about William Penn, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Daniel Boone, Davy Crockett, Kit Carson, George Custer, Ulysses Grant, and Robert E. Lee.  They weren’t academically vetted manuscripts, of course —they were intended for elementary aged children, after all.  It is also true that some of these stories contained as much myth as fact, but it was the reading of these stories that gave children heroes —people who were, according to pre-communist educators, worthy of emulation.

VMI 1917I am not alone, apparently.  Another young man was exposed to these kinds of stories.  His name was Lewis Burwell Puller.  He was born in West Point, Virginia on 26 June 1898 —making him a little more than 8 years younger than my grandfather.  He grew up reading the same kinds of…

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