Monthly Archives: June 2014

A bridge to the past

Capt. Gail Currie

Capt. Gail Currie

 

A few months back, my friend Carol Schlaepfer helped to run an estate sale in California for former pilot, Gail Currie.  Mr. Currie, a U.S. Army Air Corps captain, became a photographer after WWII and Carol was kind enough to salvage some of his posters left at his Rancho Cucamonga home and ship them to me.

Alexander Vraciu, USN, F6F Hellcat, PTO

Alexander Vraciu, USN, F6F Hellcat, PTO

I was able to name some of the aircraft, but others were identified by another dear friend, Scott Brady, a former member of the U.S. Air Force  and an avid aviation buff and model builder.  The T-38 Talons were used as “trainers” for new pilots and by the Thunderbirds; who now use the F-16.  The F-4 Phantoms were used by the Blue Angels in Wichita, Kansas when Scott was only 7 years old – and he was hooked!!

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I sincerely hope everyone enjoys the picture show and will remember Capt. Currie.  I was unable to locate further research on this pilot, but should anything surface, I will either update this post or create another.

Thank you – and everyone have a wonderful day!

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Also sent from Carol was this picture of Red Cross workers landing in Normandy……

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Air Force Humor______2453804056_fbd901b0f6

air-force-funny

 

 

 

Click on images to enlarge and read.

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Farewell Salutes – 

F. William Bauers Jr. – Washington DC; US Army Air Corps, Lt.Colonel (Ret.), WWII, pilothalfstaffflag

James Buell – Oneida, NY & Clearwater, FL; US Army, WWII

Stanley Curtis – Vancouver, Can & Pomona, CA; US Navy, Lt., WWII, minesweeper duty

Paul Manginnis – Alexandria, VA; US Coast Guard; USMC, Colonel (Ret.)

Herbert Ollis – Knoxville, TN; US Army,278th Armored Cavalry Regiment

Jack Riley – Hamilton, NZ; RAF, squadron leader, WWII

Virginia Rossine – Memphis, TN, WAVES, WWII

Kent Thoren – Belvidere, IL; US navy, WWII

Johannes Veldhuis – Almelo, Netherlands; Mount Home, AR & Sorrento, FL; Dutch Army & Navy, WWII, PTO

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Correction – 

Curtis P-40

Curtis P-40

 

Pierre Lagacé has noted that the plane noted as a P-40 should be listed as a RCAF Spitfire from the 443 Squadron.  How Capt. Currie acquired this is unknown, but Carol has informed me today that the research out in California is continuing.

 

 

Maori aircrew serving with 75 (NZ) Squadron, 1939-45

This post holds information that many people are unaware of. I’m certain you’ll enjoy this.  For further information, you can enter the 28 Maori Battalion HERE___

75(nz)squadron

Many thanks once again to Chris for his contribution of this post. Whilst the blog has presented information about the Maori airmen that flew with 75(NZ) Squadron, specifically to certain crews, I think it’s fitting tribute to them as a group that we should recognise these individuals and their contribution to the Squadron and Bomber Command – as Chris observes, It’s fascinating, and quite ironic that these young boys, often from isolated rural backgrounds, travelled to the other side of the world in Britain’s defence, when it’s quite feasible that their great-grandfathers could have fought against the British in defence of their own lands and political independence………

MUS050651-1600 Photo from The Weekly News,17 March 1943, with caption, “A Maori team at a British air station – R. W. Raharuhi (Takara), M. T. Parata (Waikanae), M. T. T. Manawaiti and E. H. Gray (Otaki).” Thought to have been taken at Mildenhall.
–…

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From D-Day, to the Rhine, to Korea: Roy Rushton

A great war post from Dan Bjarnason.

KapyongKorea

Seventy years ago, Roy Rushton peered through a hole in the floor of his vibrating aircraft as it swept over the Normandy coast. Just below, he saw German flak ripping the sky apart.

It didn’t look good; and Roy’s day was just beginning.

Rushton was heading into his first battle, in his first war. There would be more of each. Wherever Roy Rushton turned up, exciting, noisy, dangerous things always seemed to happen.

tmpC172 Roy Rushton, as a sniper in Holland, January 1945 © Roy Rushton

It’s tough to imagine a soldier who’s been through more perilous moments than Roy Rushton. But he is neither a brooder; nor a gasbag. He’s a level-headed, laid-back fellow, with a wry sense of humour, but with no sense at all of self-importance. Quite the guy.

At 11 p.m. on the 5th of June, 1944, Rushton and ten other Paratroopers in that plane, watched England…

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Intermission Stories (25)

Martin Painkin

Martin Painkin

Martin Painkin

The U.S. Army Ranger

Martin Painkin was born in the Bronx, New York and joined the National Guard in the fall of 1940 – he was 15 years old.  Nearly four years later, he landed in the middle of a massive invasion.  “It was a slaughter.  It really was,” said Martin.

As a 19-year-old Private First Class with the 2nd Ranger Battalion, Painkin landed at Pointe du Hoc, the cliff promontory between Utah and Omaha Beaches, at 0711 hours – 41 minutes after H-Hour on the Longest Day.  The Germans welcomed the Rangers to Normandy with concentrated rifle, artillery and rocket fire.  For many of the men, the assault was over before it began.

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“As soon as we hit the beach and they dropped the ramp, bam!  They were dead,” said Painkin.  “All around you there were burning ships and a lot of guys floating face down.  Dead.  Kaput.”  The Rangers that made it to shore alive and uninjured flattened themselves on the beach.  “You lay in the sand and you were too scared to move.  In front of you , you would see little dots in the sand, and those were machine-gun bullets.”

By noon, the survivors scaled the 100-foot cliffs before them and their commander transmitted a message, “Have reached the Pointe du Hoc.  Completed. Need ammunition and reinforcements.   Heavy losses.” (No reinforcements were available.)

Rangers demonstrate the D-Day climb at Pointe du Hoc

Rangers demonstrate the D-Day climb at Pointe du Hoc

“The lucky ones, we made it,” Martin added.  “Whenever we ran into something tough   , they’d say, ‘Send in the Rangers!’  We were not supermen, as they thought we were.  We were maybe just a little better trained.”

For various actions throughout 1944, Martin Painkin was awarded more than a dozen medals for valor: Silver Star, Bronze Star, British Military Medal of Valor, Distinguished Service Cross, Purple Heart, and Croix de Guerre to name a few.  (“Boy, oh boy, I must have been some idiot,” Martin said.)

Painkin’s wife, Barbara, also at the interview, began to read from her husband’s Silver Star citation:

On numerous occasions he purposely exposed himself to well-aimed enemy fire in order to determine the enemy positions.  After locating these positions, he boldly attacked and demolished them.  He continued for three days to act with utter disregard for his own safety as he hunted and destroyed numerous snipers and machine-gunners.”

“You know something?” Painkin said.  “That shows we were idiots.  I mean, who the hell would do that?  A lot of these things we did without even thinking.  I tell you one thing – I wouldn’t do it again.”

Bill Mauldin's version

Bill Mauldin’s version

Martine Painkin gave this interview to Staci Sturrock, of the Palm Beach Post, from his wheelchair where he now lives at the VA Community Center, Riviera Beach, Florida.

Click on images to enlarge.

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Current veteran news – 

The attributes we so love in the Greatest Generation continue in many of our people today.  One such example is the stamina and endurance of Sgt. Cory Remsburg, 75th Ranger Regiment.  While on his 10th deployment, was paces behind a fellow soldier as he stepped on a mine.  Cory was transported, while in a coma, but still alive.  After 5 years, various VA hospitals, numerous doctors and operations, countless hours of rehap and the efforts of an army of caregivers – including his father, stepmother and service dog, Leo – Sgt. Cory Remsburg managed to stand in front of the U.S. Congress and give a thumbs-up!

 Army Ranger 1st Class Sgt. Remsburg

Army Ranger 1st Class Sgt. Remsburg

Notice the sign above the mirror

Notice the sign above the mirror

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Farewell Salutes – 

Carl Booker – Richardson, TX; US Army, Sgt., WWIIlest-we-forget

James Caesar – Mill Creek, WA; US Army, Lt.Colonel (Ret.), Vietnam 2 tours

Gerald Dederick Jr. – Hackensack, NJ & Gulf Stream, FL; US Navy, WWII, Medical corps, USS Dover & land hospitals

Norman Eldeer – Calgary, Can.; Canadian & UN forces, Major 35 years

Joe Moore – Brookfield, MO; US Army (Ret. 21 years), WWII & Korea

Donald Prindiville – Lombard, IL; US Army, WWII

Athol White – Tauranga, NZ; RNZ Air Force # 4215809, WWII

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Intermission Stories (24)

Charlie Meyer (left) and his brother Robert (right), both US airmen.

Charlie Meyer (left) and his brother Robert (right), both US airmen.

Charlie Meyer

Bombardier, US Army Air Corps

Charlie Meyer, of Hoboken, New Jersey, became a B-17 bombardier  for the 388th Bomber Group and made 34 mission flights over France and Germany in 1944 – this included D-Day.

The B-17 crew received strict orders before departing Knettishall, England, in the predawn darkness of that famous day: “No aborts on this mission.”  Bombardier Meyer’s target – the beaches of Normandy.  His timing?  Just before the Allied troops went ashore.

Perched on the nose cone of a B-17, Meyer typically enjoyed the best view the Flying Fortress had to offer.  “Beautiful. Up, down, sideways and all around,” he said in his interview with Staci Sturrock.  But as his plane crossed the English Channel early that morning, “you couldn’t see a damn thing because of the cloud coverage.”

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Their second time out, the B-17s bombed farther inland.  “This time, the clouds had cleared, giving us a panoramic view of this awesome undertaking.  A bridge of ships across the Channel.”

Although he wasn’t able to clearly see the troops on the beaches of Normandy – “They were ants on the ground” – it wasn’t hard for Charlie to imagine what they endured.  “It must have been hell.  I wonder how those guys lived through D-Day.  I don’t know if I would have made it on the ground, truthfully.”

But World War II was a true team effort, unlike any military conflict since.  “Our war was a lot different because 100 % of the people were in it.  Everybody was involved.  Most of us who lived it all these years lived it quietly.  “I’m not a her.  Somebody said, ‘Do it,’ and we did it.”  Meyer ended up flying 34 missions.

Charlie Meyer is 95 years old now, resides in Greenacres, Florida and, as you can see – he can still fit in his uniform!

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Click on images to enlarge.

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Personal note –

I would like to know your opinion of my inserting more humor into the posts to ease the constant tension of war (similar to what the soldiers themselves did at the time.)  Should it be a small joke, picture, postcard or cartoon per each post or a post by itself – say, after every 5 or 6 posts?  Should the humor be above or below the Farewell Salutes?  Will this be making the posts far too long and you’ll get bored from all the reading?  You do  have a say in how you read this site – so voice your opinion!!

Being as this post was about the Army Air Corps – one of these might have been used ___________

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The new "Learn-as-you-Go" pilot training method.

The new “Learn-as-you-Go” pilot training method.

We’ll be back into WWII after July 4th and if I don’t hear from you – – Well, do you REALLY want to leave me to my own resources? (Actually, I will be getting some assistance from Chris @ his site.)

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Farewell Salutes – 

Edward Adrian – Lake Stevens, WA; US Navy, WWII, USS Long Island7388b_To-Honor-Ones-Country-Wreath

Michelle Bates – Royal Palm Beach, FL; US Air Force, 8 years

Thomas Bigley – Washington DC; US Navy, ViceAdmiral (Ret. 38 yrs.), submarine & surface vessels

Marvin Etter – Chambersburg, PA; USMC, WWII & Korea

James Honey – Arkansas; US Army, Korea

Robert Montgomery – Dargaville, NZ; Regimental # 625875, WWII

Frank Petrone – Stonington, RI; US Army, Korea, 2 Bronze Stars

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D-Day: History Geek hits Omaha Beach

 

Painting of D-Day beach, artist unknown.

Painting of D-Day beach, artist unknown.

Lemuel, our fellow blogger from New Zealand, gave us a view of the D-Day 69th anniversary at Omaha Beach – I’m certain you will enjoy this post and the photos as much as I have.

History Geek

Today is D-Day.  And I don’t mean that in the figurative sense.  Today marks the 69th anniversary of the Allied landings at Normandy on 6th June 1944.  The original non-metaphorical D-Day.  To commemorate this day of days I thought I’d share some of my personal experiences from a visit to one of the most iconic battlefields of the Second World War – Omaha Beach.

Omaha was a code name given to one of the five beaches chosen as the landing points for Allied forces.  The Americans landed at Omaha and to the west on Utah Beach, with the high cliffs of Pointe du Hoc separating the two.  The U.S. Rangers scaled these heights in the early hours of that morning to neutralize a gun battery overlooking the beaches – but that is another story.  To the east Allied forces landed at another three beaches, Gold, Juno and Sword.  Behind all…

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Intermission Stories (23)

John Edmunds, RCN

John Edmunds, RCN

John Edmunds

The Canadian Seaman

On D-Day, John Edmunds, from Burlington, Ontario, 19 years old, was in the Royal Canadian Navy assigned as a helmsman on an escort ship leading cargo vessels to Normandy.  Aboard the HMCS Drumheller, he was headed for Juno Beach.

Seaman Edmunds stood at the helm of his ship as his captain barked down orders from the bridge, “Port, two degrees!”  John sailed the Flower-class corvette vessel in circles around a convoy of 15 cargo ships for the length of their three-hour voyage across the English Channel.  And then – he looked toward the approaching shore.  The reality of what laid ahead of the Allies came into view, “We looked out across the English Channel and whole horizon was ships, thousands of ships.”

HMCS Drumheller

HMCS Drumheller

Men lined the deck with binoculars, searching the seas for German submarines.  Edmunds had already seen the U-boats sink 12 of the 60 ships the Drumheller had helped across the Atlantic in the first days of the war; men screaming for help in the open water. (“You heard the yelling and the screaming, but we couldn’t stop,” Edmunds recalled.)

Quickly there was a sound, unforgettable, advancing like a wave; a heartbeat of cannon fire like two tractor-trailers continually colliding head-on in the distance.  Allied destroyers, their warring sides turned toward the French shore, strafed the hills beyond the beaches for German concrete bunkers.  The Germans answered in a roaring rhythm as the Allied troops landed on the shores in bloody waves.

John Edmunds, (center), during the war years

John Edmunds, (center), during the war years

Edmunds had never heard or seen anything like it.  “When the tide came out, there were bodies floating everywhere.  Unbelievable.”  Cannon fire burst overhead as the Drumheller made way for the 15 cargo vessels to sail near shore, perilously close to scraping bottom.  He watched the Liberty ships line up bow-to-stern, parallel to the shore to form a breakwater, an artificial harbor where troop-carrying ships could land and unload their tanks, men and supplies.

Then, these ships would scuttle themselves into a permanent position; some of them remain there rusting off the shores of Normandy to this day.  The Drumheller was ordered to escort supply ships throughout the invasion.  The crew slept in 4-hour shifts, ready to drop depth charges off the back to blast any German subs.  They did not set foot on land for 42 days.  “You sort of went stir crazy,” Edmund said.

HMCS Drumheller, pix taken by Charles Sadler, RCNVR, 1st Class Stoker, while serving on the HMCS Columbia.

HMCS Drumheller, pix taken by Charles Sadler, RCNVR, 1st Class Stoker, while serving on the HMCS Columbia.

John Edmunds is now 89 years old, retired and living in West Palm Beach, Florida.  His memories were given to Carlos Frias of The Palm Beach Post for print.

For further information on the HMCS Drumheller. 

Click on images to enlarge.

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Farewell Salutes – 

Dale Anderson – Toledo, OH; US Army Air Force, Col. (Ret.), WWII, ETO

From, Anna,  Maiden On The Midway

From, Anna, Maiden On The Midway

F.William Bauers Jr. – Washington DC; US Army Air Corps, WWII, pilot – 68 missions

Leslie Graves – Groton, NY; US Navy, Lt. JG; pilot instructor, WWII

Marshall Johnson – Woburn, MA; US Army, Korea

Hugh McKinnon – New Zealand; RNZ Army # 462352

Joseph Melarango – Cleveland, OH; US Navy, WWII

Raymond Palumbo – Hillside, IL; US Army, Korea

Thomas Seigle – Knoxville, TN & Sarasota, FL; US Navy, Pilot, Vietnam

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Intermission Stories (22)

19 year old sailor, Sol Kaslow

19 year old sailor, Sol Kaslow

Sol Kaslow

PT Boat Quartermaster

On D-Day, Sol Kaslow was a 19 year-old from Philadelphia serving on PT 508, dubbed the “Mairzey Doats” (after the popular 1943 song) as a quartermaster.  Hours before their most important mission began, the 13 men aboard Pt 508 bowed their heads and talked to God.  “It was not a crew that normally prayed.  We just didn’t do it,” said Kaslow.  “But at the time, prayer seemed appropriate.”

The small, but fast vessels of the US Navy’s Mosquito Fleet shouldered a mighty D-Day mission.  Prior to the invasion, the highly maneuverable, mahogany-hulled boats protected slow-moving minesweepers as they cleared a broad sea lane from British naval bases to the French coast.

The crew of PT 508

The crew of PT 508

Once D-Day commenced, the PTs performed water rescues, transported personnel and maintained a picket line to guard the western flank of Utah Beach’s convoy unloading area.  “We all knew if this was successful, it would change the whole scheme of things.  And we knew of the dangers involved.”

On the morning of  8 June, death pulled alongside PT 508.  Northwest of Utah Beach, a series of German mines – one! – two! – three! – dealt fatal blows to the escort destroyer USS Rich.  Kaslow said, “Absolutely split in half.”  His commanding officer would later write: “The explosion was terrific, and men were tossed injured and screaming into the water…  The whole ocean trembled and our boat jumped high in the air.”

PT 508 rushed in to aid the disabled destroyer, plucking survivors from its detached stern section, while other PT boats saved sailors from the rest of the smoking wreckage.  The blasts killed roughly 90 men – almost half of those aboard and injured another 73.

Kaslow and his WWII sailor hat.

Kaslow and his WWII sailor hat.

Fortunately, the crew of PT 508 pulled through D-Day, and the weeks that followed on the picket line, unharmed.  Kaslow marked the invasion’s 55th anniversary with a trip to Normandy.  He was taken back by the sensations and perceptions that his memory churned up.  “I was struck by the smell.  It was the dead bodies, and the ammunition had a certain odor.  And that stayed in my mind.  You think you would forget that after 55 years, but you don’t.”

Sol Kaslow, now 89, resides in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida and gave this story to the Palm Beach Post for their special D-Day section.

Click on images to enlarge.

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Farewell Salutes – 

Charles Alpers – Hopewell Junction, NY; US Army, WWII

Robert Cruickshank – Calgary, Alberta, Can; RC Navy (19 yrs.), Lt., HMCS Micmac, Skeena & Mew Waterford 

Rodolpho Hernandez – Fayetteville, NC; US Army, G Co./187th RCT, Korea

Lois Mowen – Springfield, OH; US Air Force, cryptologisteaglesnelling

Donald Morrison – San Antonio, TX; US Air Force, Vietnam

Edward O’Neill – Papatoetoe, NZ; RNZ Army# 462352

Clyde Parkis – Vero Beach, FL; US Navy

Edward Ptak – BellaVista, AR; US Army, Sgt., Korea & Vietnam

William Stone III – Reston, VA; US Army, Lt.Colonel (Ret. 28 yrs.), Korea & Vietnam

James Walker – Albany, NZ; RNZ Navy # 14224

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FLAG DAY

Flag Day 2010

For this years Flag Day, I chose to help celebrate the Star Spangled Banner’s 200 years!  As national treasures go, it was a bargain: $405.90 was paid to Mary Pickersgill of Baltimore, who fashioned it from red, blue and undyed wool, plus cotton for the 15 stars to fly at the fortress guarding the city’s harbor.

A collage of 2 women, 1914, at the Smithsonian working to restore the Star-Spangled Banner in a room with a model of a giant squid; by Terry Winters.

A collage of 2 women, 1914, at the Smithsonian working to restore the Star-Spangled Banner in a room with a model of a giant squid; by Terry Winters.

An enormous flag, 30 by 42 feet, it was intended as a bold statement to the British warships that were certain to come.  And, when in September 1814, the young United States turned back the invaders in a spectacular battle witnessed by Francis Scott Key, he put his joy into a verse published first as “Defense of Fort M’Henry,” and then, set to the tune of a British drinking song – immortalized as “The Star Spangled Banner.”

A Betsy Ross Flag Day.

A Betsy Ross Flag Day.

The flag itself, enshrined since 2008 in a special chamber at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, following a $7 million restoration and due to be celebrated today, 14 June 2014 with a national singalong (http://anthemforamerica.si.edu/) remains a bold statement.  But what is it saying to you?

This story was taken from the Smithsonian Magazine with many thanks.

US-Flag

Have a wonderful day!!

Click on images to enlarge.

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Farewell Salutes – 

Melvin Arnold – Carlisle, IA; US Army Air Corps, WWII6a00d8345157c669e20133f0f333ff970b-250wi

William Beach – Columbus, IN; US Army, Korea

Guadalupe Castillo – La Villa, TX; US Air Force, Vietnam

George Champagne – Greenville, RI; US Navy, WWII, USS Strong

Diane Gore – Palm Desert, CA; US Navy, Captain (Ret.)

Albert Hauss Jr. – Millstadt, IL; US Army Air Corps, WWII

Brandon Maggart – Kirksville, MO; US Army, Iraq, Sgt., 5th Air Defense Artillery Reg.

Charles Person – Fanwood, NJ; US Navy, WWII

Clifford “Chief” Smith – Pensacola, FL; USMC Army National Guard, Air Force Reserves

Raymond Trenkamp – Maynard, IA; US Army, Korea

William Wade – New Zealand; Royal Navy # 327647, WWII

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Intermission Stories (21)

!8 yer old, Walter Gumula

!8 yer old, Walter Gumula

Walter Gumula

D-Day Frogman

Walter Gumula was a state champion swimmer from Hammond, Indiana and became an 18 year old frogman among the first waves to land on Omaha Beach.  He recounted his experience as:

Their mission was a secret, so Walter and his 6-man crew boarded a British freighter, wearing Army green instead of Navy blue.  The idea was to fool the Nazis into thinking they were regular troops instead of frogmen, the highly-trained underwater demolition experts known today as Navy SEALS.  Their orders were to blow up the fearsome German fortifications on Omaha beach.  But as soon as they boarded the landing craft, the plan went horribly wrong.

“When we got close to the beach, a shell hit the front door and went through the boat.  It went right through a bunch of guys in my unit.  One guy lost an arm and another lost his eyes.  They were all wounded including our ensign.  Anyone who stood up in the boat got hit because machine-gun fire was coming through the open door.  Bullets were flying in.  The boat was drifting.  As soon as it turned away from the beach, those who could, went over the side.”

For months they had trained together closely in Fort Pierce, FL, expecting to assault Pacific beaches.  Now, only Gumula was left on a cold and bloody French beach.  “When I got to the beach, I was all alone, ” he said.  With his crew gone, along with his mission, Walter followed 8 Army engineers up a rope ladder to the top of a cliff where they were trying to take out a German position.

Walter Gumula, today

Walter Gumula, today

They gave him a Browning automatic rifle and told him to lay down covering fire as they crept toward an underground Nazi observation post with knapsacks of plastic explosives, which they threw into the hole.  The blast severed German communication lines to inland artillery.  Gumula asked to stay with the engineers, but the sergeant sent him back to the beach.  “I was young and dumb and didn’t know what I was supposed to be doing.”

Walter began crawling, aiming for a spot where the bluff ended at the beach.  When he dared to raise his head, he was astonished at the scene below.  “I couldn’t believe what I was looking at.  There were literally thousands of boats out there, three lines of ships coming across from England.  One battleship was blasting right over the cliff I was on.  Those shots were coming right over my head.  They sounded like a fast train coming by, making a weird noise.

But the boats were piled up, unable to land.  The troops already on the rocky beach were trapped between withering German fire and a rising tide.  “They were starting to pull back.  I thought they were going to leave us.  The worst barrages were coming from the large gun emplacement pillbox close to the beach.”

equipment for the WWII frogman

equipment for the WWII frogman

Suddenly he watched a destroyer with 5″ guns pull in so perilously close to shore he expected it to run aground.  At point blank range, the ship’s guns blasted apart the German pill box.  Immediately, troops started heading inland across that stretch of beach.  “He saved the whole thing,” Walter remarked.

As the ship turned to head for deeper water, German guns opened up, pounding the Allied armada with massive 14″ and 16″ shells.  Gumula watched the ship get hit 3 times.  “It broke in half and sank immediately.  I actually saw that”

By the time Gumula found the officer in charge of his stretch of beach, shrapnel was raining down like hail on the living and the dead.  “There were literally thousands of bodies,” Walter said as he recalled the events of 70 years ago and related them to reporter, Barbara Marshall, Palm Beach Post.  Mr. Gumula now resides in Port Salerno, FL.

“You never forget it, the look on someone’s face when they die right in front of your eyes.” ______ Walter Gumula, frogman

U.S. Navy SEAL Museum, Fort Pierce, FL

U.S. Navy SEAL Museum, Fort Pierce, FL

 

Click on images to view full-size.

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Farewell Salute – 

Eugene Allen – Harlington, TX; USMC, Cpl., Korea

Kenneth Bradley – Bellville, AR; US Air Force

Allan Berry – Birkdale, NZ; RNZVR, SubLt., WWII

Angelo DiMascio Sr. – Cranston, RI; US Army, WWII, 82nd Airborne

Rosemary Gannon – Highland Falls, NY; civilian employee at West Point 1942 thru 1987

Walter “Cap” Haworth Jr. – Pocatello, ID; US Air Force, Captain (Ret. 20 years), 3 tours Vietnam

Gordon Kendall – Toronto, Can; RC Air Force, WWII

Robert Kranich (100) – Winchester, VA; US Army, Colonel (Ret.), WWII

Jesse Schaudies – Raliegh, SC; US Army, Corps of Engineers, WWII, PTO

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