Blog Archives

Propaganda Perspectives

We often see examples of Allied propaganda posters, but the other side had them as well…

The Müscleheaded Blog

It’s easy to forget,
sometimes that other
societies have a perspective
on things that is very
different from our own.

It’s probably a major reason
why we have so much conflict
in the world.

One way to understand
(of course, that doesn’t
mean you’re going to
agree with it ) things
from the other guy’s
viewpoint is to look at
his sources for information.

If he really doesn’t like you,
based on cultural reasons
alone, there’s a good chance
that he’s been taught that
you’re a big fink by the
educational and political
institutional media of his
society.

Some of the references
are rather random,
but most of it is part of
a larger and tightly controlled
frame of reference-
— a plan, if you will.

That ‘planned’ part is what
we call propaganda.

Most of us are familiar
with our own U.S. propaganda,
some of it made by Disney
Studios, during World…

View original post 283 more words

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Current look back at the home front

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My Years of Eating Dangerously

by: William Jeanes, former editor-in-chief of ‘Car and Driver’

Marie Osmond told me on tv that she lost 50 lbs. eating prepackaged meals sent to her home, and not too long ago, the nation’s first lady ran off the White House pastry chef.  That reminded me of childhood mealtimes and my grandmother’s nutritional malfeasance.

Until well after WWII ended, I lived on 6th Street in Corinth, MS, with my grandparents.  Two aunts also lived with us.  All the men were in the Pacific, leaving my grandfather (Pop), to provide.  My grandmother (Mom), ran the house.

Pop was a superb provider.  He worked as a carpenter for the TVA and had a green B sticker on his car’s windshield, meaning that we had income and gasoline.  He also had a green thumb and grew green vegetables in a huge backyard garden.  Pop also fished, and he put fresh bream and crappie on our big dining room table at least twice a week.  He also oversaw a backyard chicken house that delivered eggs as well as raw material for the big, black frying pan that dominated Mom’s cooking.

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Mom was a canner and preserver.  We had – in what seemed to be endless quantity – green beans, pickled beets, peaches, strawberry preserves, and goodness knows what else.

Mom supplemented this bounty by going to the tiny Kroger store once a week for meat, which was rationed, and such staples as Luzianne coffee, Domino sugar, Clabber Girl baking powder and Crisco shortening.

Many things were served fried: chicken, green tomatoes, fish and pork chops.  Steak, scarce in wartime, was “chicken-fried.”  Meatloaf was baked of course, as was macaroni and cheese.

Mom always overcooked the steak and pork chops.  In those times, the idea of a rare steak or hamburger could disgust whole neighborhoods.  A typical summer meal included fried fish, tomatoes, green beans or butter beans and turnip greens or collards.  I hated greens more than I hated Tojo or Hitler.  If we had salad, it was a wedge of iceberg lettuces doused with French dressing, an orangey liquid unknown in France.

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Modern nutritionists would hyperventilate just thinking about what we ate in the 1940’s.  On the healthy side were the vegetables and greens that were available 6 months out of the year.  From there, things went nutritionally sideways.  Nowadays my grandparents would be guilty of child abuse.

Can you imagine a germ-laden hen house in a backyard of today?  How about wringing the neck of a chicken on the back steps?  Those activities would have brought the SWAT teams from PETA and the EPA pouring through our front door.

The Dept. of Agriculture never inspected Pop’s garden, let alone the hen house, and Mom adhered to no federal guidelines when it came to canning and cooking and cake making.  As fore fried food, the only questions were, “Is it crisp enough?” and “May I have some more?”

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Out house was heated by coal, we drank non-homogenized milk and we rarely locked doors.  It’s a wonder I wasn’t overcome by fumes, poisoned or stolen by gypsies.  Yet we survived.  Pop lived to be 88 and Mom 82.  Both aunts made it well past 80 and I was 77 on my last birthday. [This was originally published in Sept/Oct. 2015].

That’s what 400 year’s worth of fried chicken and beet pickles can do for you.

Condensed from the Saturday Evening Post.

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 Military Humor – on their food – 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Robert Arthur – Louisville, KY; USMC, WWII, PTO

Charlton ‘Chuck’ Cox – Seattle, WA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, B-17 navigator/Korea06062012_AP120606024194-600

Edward Fuge – Otaki, NZ; RNZ Navy, WWII

Delva Gess – Chewelah, ID; USO, WWII

Roy Hart – Saskatchewan, CAN; RC Air Force, WWII, CBI & ETO

Cecil Jarmer – Portland, OR; US Navy, WWII, CBI

George Macneilage – San Bernadino, CA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 11th Airborne Div., artillery

Nita Rinehart – Ashtabula, OH; US Navy, WWII WAVES, WWII

Ernest Sprouse Jr. – Knoxville, TN; US Navy, WWII, USS Frost

Gene Wilder, Milwaukee, WI; US Army, (beloved actor)

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January 1944 (2)

Pappy Boyington, famed rebel leader of the Black Sheep Squadron

Pappy Boyington, famed rebel leader of the Black Sheep Squadron

3 January – Greg “Pappy” Boyington commanded 46 fighters, flying from Ondonga, to Rabaul.  Several needed to abort due to mechanical failure.  From 20-24,000′ they dove to intercept 27 Zeros of the 253 Kokutai, while they were already confronted with 27 Zeros of the 204 Kokutai.  Boyington’s F4U 17915 and his wingman F4U 02723 were shot down and both men were listed as missing.

New Britain

New Britain

4 January – the ‘Snooper Squadron’ of the 13th Air Force flew their first mission. Fifteen B-24’s, escorted by 70 or more P-38’s and US Navy F6F’s bombed Lakunai Airfield, near Rabaul, on New Britain.  The enemy sent 80-90 fighters to intercept.  The US claimed 20 enemy aircraft downed and lost one B-24 and 2 damaged.  Twelve other aircraft supported ground troops on Bougainville.

Marines on Cape Gloucester

Marines on Cape Gloucester

6-9 January – Australian troops at Cape Gloucester in northern New Britain experienced heavy fighting on these 3 days as they advanced to the Aogiri River.  By the 9th, they had taken the Aogiri Ridge.

11 January – US B-24 Liberators made a Low-level attack on Japanese shipping around Kwajalein Atoll.  They sank 2 vessels and damaged 4 others.  The carrier aircraft would continue bombing in preparation for Operation Flintlock for the Marshall Islands.  This area comprises 32 island groups, the largest being Kwajalein that consists of some 100 islets that form a lagoon 66 miles long and 20 miles wide.

Gen. Adachi at Buna, New Guinea

Gen. Adachi at Buna, New Guinea

On New Guinea, 9 days after the US landed at Saidor, Gen. Adachi was back in Madang, but the 14,000 troops he sent ahead on foot, would not reach him until 1 March.  More than 4,000 men of the Japanese 20th and 51st divisions had died enroute.  Between the terrain, shortage of supplies and American strafing, they were ill-equipped to fight for the town.

Japanese Sgt. Eiji Lizuka, 51st Div., survived the journey: “We passed many dead and dying soldiers.  As we had no fresh uniforms or shoes we would strip the dead and take theirs.  Sometimes we took clothes and boots from men who were still alive, but could no longer move, and we said to them, ‘You don’t need such fine shoes any more.’  They would watch us with dull eyes and let us do anything.  We even took water canteens from them.  That was the worst, to hear a soldier say, ‘Don’t take my canteen away from me, I’m still alive.”‘

In Burma, 36 A-36’s, P-51’s and P-40’s of the 10th Air Force, pounded an encampment of approximately 4,900 enemy troops and a large amount of supplies, causing considerable damage.

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Men of the 10th Air Force, 7th Bombardment Group

13 January –  in China, two B-25’s of the 14th Air Force made a sweep from Hong Kong to Hainan attacking 4 large boats, several warehouses, a radio station and a car at Fort Bayard, China.  One of the vessels exploded.
15 January – on New Guinea, the Australian troops took Sio, which put them 50 miles from the American troops at Saidor.  The Japanese on the Huon became disorganized as the Australians took over the Finiesterre Range in the northern sector of the peninsula.

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Matariki Maori Festivals – 

The Pleiades star cluster.

The Pleiades star cluster.

No Matariki Maori festival can be official with out a Haka.  This particular dance was performed to honor a veteran….

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Military Humor – 

new_zealand_army_soldierfunny-road-sign-new-zealand

 

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

George Bellamy – Nelson, NZ; RNZ Navy # 4342, WWII, Signalman

Samuel Christie – Atlanta, GA; US Merchant Marine, WWII

Margraten Cemetery, Netherlands

Margraten Cemetery, Netherlands

Leonard Irons – Ormeau, AUS; RNZ Expeditionary Force # 41691, WWII, 27th Battalion, POW

Henry Logan – Sleepy Hollow, NY; US Air Force, intelligence

Edward McAleer – Chelmsford, MA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 188th/11th Airborne Division

Michael Norin – Los Angeles, CA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, cryptographer

Maurice O’Connor – Auckland, NZ; RNZ Army # 21089, WWII, gunner, Anti-Tank Regiment

Benjamin Prange – Hickman, NE; US Army, Afghanistan, SSgt., 4th Infantry, KIA

Glen Stockton – St. Joseph, MO; US Army Air Corps, WWII, ETO, pilot

Paul Tully – Short Hills, NJ; US Army, WWII

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Flight Nurses

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Before World War II, the U.S. military showed little interest in using aircraft and flight nurses to evacuate wounded soldiers to rear areas. The global war, however, forced the U.S. Army Air Forces to revolutionize military medical care through the development of air evacuation (later known as aeromedical evacuation) and flight nurses.

The rapid expansion of USAAF air transportation routes around the world made it possible to fly wounded and sick servicemen quickly to fully-equipped hospitals far from the front lines. This revolution saved the lives of many wounded men, and the introduction of flight nurses helped make it possible.

In early 1942, airlift units in Alaska, Burma and New Guinea successfully evacuated patients using the same transport aircraft that had carried men and supplies to the front. Due to a pressing need, the USAAF created medical air evacuation squadrons and started a rush training program for flight surgeons, enlisted medical technicians, and flight nurses at Bowman Field, near Louisville, Ky.

Landscape

The need for flight nurses became critical after the Allied invasion of North Africa in November 1942, but the women at Bowman Field had not finished their training. Nevertheless, the USAAF sent these nurses to North Africa on Christmas Day.

On Feb. 18, 1943, the U.S. Army Nurse Corps’ first class of flight nurses formally graduated at Bowman Field. 2nd Lt. Geraldine Dishroon, the honor graduate, received the first wings presented to a flight nurse. In 1944, Dishroon served on the first air evacuation team to land on Omaha Beach after the D-Day invasion. 

Since the aircraft used for air evacuation also transported military supplies, they could not display the Red Cross. With no markings to indicate their non-combat status, these evacuation flights were vulnerable to enemy attacks. For this reason, flight nurses and medical technicians were volunteers.

flight nurses

flight nurses

To prepare for any emergency, flight nurses learned crash procedures, received survival training, and studied the effects of high altitude on various types of patients. In addition, flight nurses had to be in top physical condition to care for patients during these rigorous flights. 

Eventually, about 500 Army nurses served as members of 31 medical air evacuation transport squadrons operating worldwide. It is a tribute to their skill that of the 1,176,048 patients air evacuated throughout the war, only 46 died en route. Seventeen flight nurses lost their lives during the war.

Click on the following links for more information about flight nurses during WWII.

2nd Lt. Elsie S. Ott
1st Lt. Suella Bernard
1st Lt. Aleda E. Lutz
1st Lt. Mary L. Hawkins
Flight Nurse’s Creed

Click on images to enlarge.

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Military Nurse Humor – 

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“We’ll order the seafood. It’s probably expected of us.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Betty Collier Dorreen – Takapuna, NZ; NZ Women’s Auxiliary Army Core # 809171

Phyllis Himes – Bisbee, ND; US Navy WAVE; WWII

Pearl Hilliard Holmes – Clayton, NC; Military weapon repairfb7bc2ae8dc9a210e4db2cd51e5e0d25

Dorothy Howard – Knoxville, TN; US Navy WAVE, Naval Air Transport

Francis Newhouse King – Delaware, OH; US Army WAC, WWII, Sgt.

Grace Sayles – Gilbertson, PA; US Army WAC, WWII, nurse

Alida Simmons – Ridgewood, NJ; US Navy WAVE, WWII

Marjorie Henkle Stepp – Irvington, IN; US Army WAC, WWII, SSgt.

Kathryn Walker – Indiana, PA; US Navy WAVE, WWII

Margaret Wolf – NYC, NY; US Nursing Corps, 1st LT.

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The Harrowing Job of Mapping Bougainville

Before the Marines would land on Bougainville, the mapping of the island needed to be accomplished.  The B-17, “Old 666” was assigned the mission – one that proved far more dangerous than first expected….

Short video.

 

Contributed by The Old Mainer.

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Presidents Day – Back in the Day – can be seen HERE!  washington

Have a great celebration!!

Click on images to enlarge.

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 Canadian National Flag Day – Animated-gif-Canada-flag-waving-on-pole-in-front-of-water-picture-moving

The Royal Union Flag, which is also the flag of the United Kingdom, was used as the official flag of Canada until 1965. Various designs of the Canadian Red Ensign were used between 1868 and 1965 but Canada’s Parliament never officially adopted them. The National Flag of Canada’s current design results from a period of discussion, debate and political maneuvering in the early 1960s.

George F.G. Stanley designed the current flag, which is inspired by the Royal Military College of Canada’s flag. The multi-party parliamentary committee formed to select a new flag unanimously chose the design on October 29, 1964. The House of Commons passed the design on December 15, 1964. Queen Elizabeth II proclaimed the new flag on January 28, 1965, and it was inaugurated on February 15 in the same year.

Celebrate!!!

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Military Humor – us-navy-navy-air-force-military-demotivational-poster-1266120498

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Farewell Salutes – 

Gerald Bliss – Great Falls, MT; US Air Force, Vietnam, P-61 Black Widow pilot, Bronze Star

Ann Caracristi – Bronxville, NY; US Gov’t cryptologist, WWII, Japanese codebook, NSA Chief

Donal Douglas – Seattle, WA; US Army Air Corps, WWIItribute

Agapito Gonzales – Sante Fe, NM; US Navy, WWII, PTO

Mary King – Toronto, CAN; RC Air Force, WWII

Don Lovetinsky – W.Liberty, IA; US Army WWII, ETO

Stuart Moore – Hot Springs, AR; US Army, WWII

Sylvia Schachne – brn: Notts, ENG/Tom’s River, NJ; British Women’s Land Army, WWII

Edward Swiski – Halboro, PA; US Army, Korea, 187th RCT

Colin Thomson – Hawkes Bay; RNZ Army # 205205, Hawkes Bay Regiment/22nd Battalion

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Home Front Memories

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When America was catapulted into World War II, life on the home front changed in ways it never had before—and probably never will again, according to people who lived through those times.

“So many people don’t know what it was like then. Everything was for the war effort,” said Shirley Compton, a vivacious 80-year-old who lives in Colonial Beach. “Everyone was close and loving and patriotic. I remember that feeling most of all.”

She grew up in Arlington, where families were encouraged to rent out rooms to workers who flocked to Washington to keep the war machine chugging.  Her childhood memories are of air-raid drills at school and blacked-out windows at home. She confesses she “did carry on a bit” when factories that made Coca–Cola and Double Bubble Bubble Gum shifted their focus to war supplies and stopped making her favorites.

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But even 6-year-old girls quickly learned to support the cause when everyone else was doing it, she said. “I never saw such a good feeling about everything, people working together,” she said. “I remember that still.”

So does Wayne Colton, a 78-year-old with an incredible memory for detail. Perhaps he paid so much attention to adults because he was an only child.  His family lived on the outskirts of Fredericksburg when it was still rural enough to be considered the country.

He was only 4 when Pearl Harbor was attacked on Dec. 7, 1941, but he sensed the seriousness of the situation—and the subsequent four-year effort to defeat Japan and Germany.  “I knew it was a life-and-death struggle,” he said. “It made a profound impression on me.”

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To those in the city or country, an account of life on the home front starts and ends with one word.  Rationing.

Processed and canned goods were shipped overseas for Allied soldiers; gasoline was used to transport troops and supplies instead of food; and sugar and coffee were limited due to war-related restrictions on imports.

Because of the shortages, the government established a system to make sure the few items available were distributed fairly.  Each American got ration books with stamps for particular items, such as cooking oil, shoes or meat.

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Living in the country, Colton and his family raised chickens and got pork from relatives who had a farm. They were able to grow most of the food they needed, unlike city-dwellers who relied on the market.

The mere mention of meat brought up a subject that made Compton cringe. Spam, a spiced ham served in a can, became popular during the war to supplement the meat shortages.

“I hate it to this day,” she said. “I don’t ever want to see it again.”

Copper was needed for wiring for every piece of equipment that rolled, floated or was flown in the war, along with the millions of radios being produced.  Zinc replaced copper as the coating on pennies, Colton said.

As much as civilians felt the shortages, they were also keenly aware of the need—and “no one complained about it,” Compton said.   Radio programs, movies and school events stressed the need to support the war because the American way of life depended on it.

“You woke up every day, realizing we were in a conflict,” Colton said. “The war was the predominant theme, and you were totally aware of how much people were sacrificing for it.”

In the months after the Pearl Harbor attack, communities appointed civilians to keep an eye on the sky and water. Volunteer spotters, who learned to identify aircraft from their silhouettes, were posted around the Fredericksburg region.

Guards were placed at the Falmouth Bridge, as well as other bridges and railroad crossings. Civil defense patrols in Fredericksburg had air-raid drills—the same kind Compton experienced in Arlington—when all the lights had to be blacked out. No one wanted to give would-be bombers a target to hit.

As a boy, Colton saw these exercises and the regular troop trains that ran through Fredericksburg, headed for training at Fort A.P. Hill. He was absolutely fascinated by the war machine.

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Woman inspecting bullets…

He learned that the nylons his mother coveted were used to make parachutes, that the metal and paper he and other children saved were used in weapons, armament and posters asking people to buy war bonds and further support the effort.

Even the fat left over from cooking was saved and turned into soap.  “It was significant to see these things,” Colton said, realizing at a young age that this wasn’t normal.

Colton was so fascinated by the military, he eventually joined the Air Force and earned a Bronze Star in Vietnam—the same medal an uncle received at the Battle of the Bulge. He retired after 20 years in the military, then worked as a defense contractor.

Rev. Wayne Colton & wife, Linda.

Rev. Wayne Colton & wife, Linda.

About 25 years ago, he answered a different call of duty: to become a minister. At 78, he’s the senior pastor at Triangle Baptist Church.  Colton never forgot the wartime experiences of his childhood.

“It gave me a sense of pride in the country and the sacrifices men and women were making,” he said. “It was a life-forming orientation.”

cdyson@freelancestar.com 

©2015 The Free Lance-Star (Fredericksburg, Va.)
Visit The Free Lance-Star (Fredericksburg, Va.) at http://www.fredericksburg.com/flshome
Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Click on images to enlarge.

For past detailed stories of the home front check into my category Home Front.

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Home Front & Political Humor –

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Pittsburgh Gazette

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Dorman Smith, Lynchburg News, 1943

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Farewell Salutes –

William Aynes – Columbus, OH; US Army, WWII/ US Air Force, Korea, Vietnam

Paul Barnhart – Endicott, NY & AK; USMC, Korea, Purple Heart Arlington_Burial_Worl_Smit_2_t755_h8a94edf1cc6e40113d3605995d57b0e00c11f81c

Charles Booth – Guildford, AUS; RA Army # 171790, WWII, 82/13th Battery/19th Div.

Bob Falen – Ontario, OR; US Army, Vietnam, Helicopter pilot

Richard Kelly – Wilmette, IL; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, HQ Co/11th Airborne

Walter McCreary – San Antonio, TX; US Army Air Corps, WWII, ETO, Tuskegee Airman, POW

Levon Raybon – Showlow, AZ; US Air Force, Korea

Robert Smith – Montgomery, AL; US Army, WWII, PTO

Jock Turner – NZ; RNZ Air Force # 437355, WWII

John Woods – Ottawa, CAN; RC Army, Korea, 25th Canadian Inf. Brigade Group, paratrooper

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An Alaskan Christmas

Aleutian Christmas

Aleutian Christmas

CHIPLEY, Fla. (Tribune News Service) — A 10-inch blanket of snow covered Fort Richardson, Alaska, when Oscar “Buck” Buchanan first arrived in October 1942.

“To some of us Florida boys, this was an experience,” Buchanan wrote in an account detailing his service during World War II that he mailed to The News Herald. “The train was late [to pick us up] and we were told it was due to moose, who would use the tracks for walking through a tunnel made of snow and couldn’t get off the tracks.”

106th Engineers

106th Engineers

This is where Buchanan, a private in the National Guard, spent most of World War II with the Company D, Second Battalion, 106th Engineers.

Two years earlier, Buchanan, then 22, left West Bay with his friend Alex Hinote to enlist.

“At that time, I either had to volunteer into the service or be drafted,” he said.

After a brief honeymoon with his new wife, Juanita Sasnett, he started moving around the country, first for his own training, then to train others.

When the bombs fell on Pearl Harbor, everything changed, he said. The unit was told to prepare to ship overseas for combat, their time extended for the length of the war, and they were promoted to general engineers.

Troops on Attu

Troops on Attu

“Our trucks, with a lot of equipment, were loaded onto a train and preceded us to Fort Dix, and sent directly to England. We followed later on Pullman cars — our first train ride — and were scheduled to follow our equipment to England on the Queen Mary,” Buchanan wrote. “While waiting for the boat, another decision was made for us to be sent to Alaska.”

The Japanese had occupied the Aleutian Islands, which fan out toward Asia from the southwestern tip of Alaska, and the U.S. government was worried about the possibility of a mainland invasion from the north.

So Buchanan was sent in the opposite direction of his things.

Along the way, he stopped with a few friends in Olympia, Wash., for 72 hours.

“We visited a ‘service center’ and were entertained by some of the staff. We asked the lady at the piano if she could play ‘Dixie.’ She could and we sang ‘Dixie Land, where I was born’ along with her,” Buchanan, now 95, wrote.

Later in the evening, they tried local oysters, confusing the waitress by asking for them raw instead of in stew.

“When the oysters came, they were the size of a quarter and in a bowl. They tasted like chalk. She said they came from China,” he recalled. “We took the stew.”

Muir Glacier, 1940's

Muir Glacier, 1940’s

The dining reportedly did not improve as Buchanan traveled by a freight boat through the Inside Passage to Alaska.

When they arrived north, the men were outfitted with winter clothes, a coal heater and an A-frame tent. It was an adjustment for those who were used to warmer climates.

“Sometimes the food froze on the plates before it could be eaten,” Buchanan said. “On Christmas Day 1942, the temperature was 43 degrees below freezing.”

At the start of the New Year, the men were moved farther north to an Alaskan base with Quonset huts, where the military had to build an airport capable of accommodating a B-24 bomber as well as a hospital, a railroad and roads. As part of the construction, they had to tunnel through a mountain to get to the harbor.

The men were aided by civilians, and Buchanan became a trained surveyor.

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As it seemed less likely the Japanese would enter Alaska, the work slowed and the American men began to relax. They skied makeshift slopes, visited Mount McKinley, received furloughs back to the States, visited Anchorage, hunted and fished.

When the war ended, the men went home to “no fanfare,” Buchanan wrote. He returned to his wife in Chipley, continued to work as a surveyor, and raised two children. He still lives in Chipley.

To this day, he said on the phone, he feels the 106th Engineer Battalion should have received a little more credit.

“We were called to a defense duty in Alaska and did it well. Even though there were no fatalities in the unit, no credit was given to them for the casualties — civilians as well as soldiers — that were prevented by preparing the Alaskan front for the invasion of the Japanese forces,” he said. “When the Japanese got ‘cold feet’ and fled to a warmer climate, the Florida boys got cold feet but stood their ground.”

©2015 The News Herald (Panama City, Fla.)
Visit The News Herald (Panama City, Fla.) at http://www.newsherald.com
Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Click on images to enlarge.

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Military Humor – 

Sometimes you just have to keep you equipment on a leash.

Sometimes you just have to keep you equipment on a leash.

Engineer's priority....

Engineer’s priority….

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

James Beavers – Marion, IN; US Army, Vietnam

Vincent Capodanno – Staten Island, NY; USMC, Vietnam, Chaplain, Medal of Honor, KIA

Milton Crenshaw – Little Rock, AR; US Army Air Corps, WWII, Tuskegee instructor0083f165f66161f63454e92890403bcd

Henry ‘Red’ Erwin – Adamsville, AL; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, Sgt., B-29 radioman, POW, Medal of Honor

Kenneth Howarth – Chester, NY; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 127th Engineers/11th Airborne

Yvonne Mole – Victor Harbor, AUS; A Army Medical Womans Service # SFX 24647, WWII

Paul Oskolkoff – Ninilchik, AK; US Navy, Vietnam

Frederick Scott – Gainsville, FL; US Army Air Corps, WWII, B-17 mechanic

Harry Shipman – Hamilton, CAN; RC Army, WWII, ETO, 48th Highlanders

Dwayne ‘Doc’ Wise – Storm Lake, IA; USMC, WWII, Korea, Lt. (Ret. 22 years)

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Alaska Films

Alaska – 1942-1943, contributed from Pierre Lagacé, 43 minutes

 

Kiska, 10 minutes

 

What remains on Alaska… 3 minutes

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Military Humor – 

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Patriot Day – 9/11/2001

Some of the destruction caused when the high-jacked American Airlines flight slammed into the Pentagon on Sept. 11. The terrorist attack caused extensive damage to the west face of

some of the destruction caused when the high-jacked American Airlines flight slammed into the Pentagon on Sept. 11. The terrorist attack caused extensive damage to the west face of the Pentagon

AFTER FLIGHT 77 hit the Pentagon on 9/11, the following incident occurred:

A chaplain, who happened to be assigned to the Pentagon, told of an incident that never made the news:
“A daycare facility inside the Pentagon had many children, including infants who were in heavy cribs. The daycare supervisor, looking at all the children they needed to evacuate, was in a panic over what they could do. There were many children, mostly toddlers, as well as the infants that would need to be taken out with the cribs.

Pentagon Memorial

Pentagon Memorial

“There was no time to try to bundle them into carriers and strollers. Just then a young Marine came running into the center and asked what they needed. After hearing what the center director was trying to do, he ran back out into the hallway and disappeared. The director thought, “Well, here we are, on our own.”
About 2 minutes later, that Marine returned with 40 other Marines in tow. Each of them grabbed a crib with a child, and the rest started gathering up toddlers. The director and her staff then helped them take all the children out of the center and down toward the park near the Potomac.

Pentagon Memorial benches w/ names on each one.

Pentagon Memorial benches w/ names on each one.

“Once they got about 3/4 of a mile outside the building, the Marines stopped in the park, and then did a fabulous thing – they formed a circle with the cribs, which were quite sturdy and heavy, like the covered wagons in the Old West. Inside this circle of cribs, they put the toddlers, to keep them from wandering off. Outside this circle were the 40 Marines, forming a perimeter around the children and waiting for instructions. There they remained until the parents could be notified and come get their children.
“The chaplain then said, “I don’t think any of us saw nor heard of this on any of the news stories of the day. It was an incredible story of our men there.” There wasn’t a dry eye in the room. The thought of those Marines and what they did and how fast they reacted; could we expect any less from them? It was one of the most touching stories from the Pentagon.

Pentagon Memorial at Arlington Cemetery

Pentagon Memorial at Arlington Cemetery

“It’s the Military, not the politicians that ensures our right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. It’s the Military who salutes the flag, who serves beneath the flag, and whose coffin is draped by the flag. If you care to offer the smallest token of recognition and appreciation for the military, please pass this on and pray for our men and women, who have served and are currently serving our country, and pray for those who have given the ultimate sacrifice for freedom.”

Click on images to enlarge.

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Farewell Salutes – 

James M. Barrett – MN; USMC, WWII, PTO, 6th Marine Division

Walter Brandes – Kenosha, WI; US Army Air Corps, WWII, ETO, SSgt., gunner

John Dawson – Whitinsville, MA; US Army, Afghanistan, KIAplaying-taps

Michael Donahue – Columbus, OH; US Army, Afghanistan, XVII Airborne Corps, Major

Ating Emine – Lawrenceville, GA; Afghanistan, Sgt.

Millie Linehan – Wichita, KS; US Navy WAVE, WWII, yeoman 3rd class

John Mark – NYC, NY; US Army, Kuwait, Pentagon, Captain

Donald Olliver – Dover, DE; US Army, Korea

Herbert Stevenson – Atawhai, NZ; RNZ Army # 395530, WWII, 23rd Battalion

Ned Teaque – Stanley, NC; US Navy, WWII

Andrew S. Villolovos – Toledo, OH; US Navy, cryptologic tech. Seaman

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Hellfire Pass – Eye Witness Account

A memorial in Hellfire Pass

A memorial in Hellfire Pass

Out in the jungles of Thailand, far from home and far from the Singapore base where they had been captured, thousands of men now found themselves working as slave labour for the Japanese army. Work on clearing the jungle to lay a railway track was now in full swing. Now based in remote camps in the forest with the most basic facilities, every single man was now suffering from the effects of malnutrition and starvation. The death toll was mounting, As Dr Hardie had recorded at another camp on Christmas Day, even before the men began their hard physical labour.

9-1804133-twb180413hellfire4_t620-1

Alistair Urquhart was working on one of the most notorious sections of the railway, one that would later be dubbed ‘Hellfire Pass’ by the Australian troops who worked on it. The early stages meant clearing a path though the trees, with a designated width and distance to be cleared every day. If it wasn’t done they had to work into the night. These was only limited scope for some respite:

Another squad were tasked with removing the rocks, trees and debris, another separated the roots to dry them out and later burn them. Meanwhile on the pickax party some men were going hammer and tong.

I said to one chap near me who was slugging his pick as if in a race, ‘Slow down mate, you’ll burn yourself out.’ ‘If we get finished early,’ he said, puffing, ‘maybe we’ll get back to camp early.’ But the soldiers would only find something else for us to do. And then the next day Japanese expectations would be higher.

Personally I tried to work as slowly as possible. The others would learn eventually but I soon discovered ways to conserve energy. If I swung the pick quickly, allowing it to drop alongside an area I had just cleared, the earth came away easier It also meant that while it looked as if I were swinging the pick like the Emperor’s favorite son, the effort was minimal.

Nevertheless under the scorching Thai sun and without a shirt or hat for protection, or shade from the nearby jungle canopy, the work soon became exhausting. Minute after minute, hour after hour, I wondered when the sun would drop and we could go back to camp.

Around midday the Japanese called for yasume. We downed tools and sat and ate rice, which we had taken with us from camp in the morning. When I opened my rice tin I found the contents had begun to ferment. It was almost rice wine and tasted horrible. But I ate it anyway.

Lunch usually lasted for around thirty minutes at the railway, depending on the officer in charge. If he were sleepy or tired, it might be longer. We used to love it when he fell asleep!

artist: John Mennie

artist: John Mennie

By mid-afternoon we had finally completed the first section. Despite enormous toil and effort over the previous ten hours, our progress had been incredibly slow. We had managed to clear the required thirty-foot width for only about twenty feet.

It was the beginning for us of what would become the most notorious railway construction that the world had ever seen. The Japanese engineer came over to inspect our work. He studied the clearing from several angles, using various surveying instruments, before declaring, ‘No gooda! Do again! Deeper!’

Utterly demoralized we had to go back to the beginning and manually dredge another foot of soil. We were all in various stages of beriberi, pellagra, malaria, dengue fever and dysentery. A new illness had also started to ravage some unfortunate prisoners. Called tinea, it was nick- named ‘rice balls’ because the hideous swelling had the tormenting tendency to attack, crack and inflame the scrotum.

Resource: WW2today.com

Click on images to enlarge
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Current News – WWII & Korean War – 

The wreckage of the USNS Mission San Miguel, a WWII & Korean War tanker is finally located…

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Military Humor – Aussie/New Zealand style

OOPS !

OOPS !

military1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"Get that button done up!"

“Get that button done up!”

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Farewell Salutes – 

Gordon Boyle – Beechwood, AUS; RA Air Force # 80337

Charles Christiansen – Cambridge, NZ; RNZ Air Force # 4311287, WWII, Fiji Leading Aircraftsman

Joy Dowler – Albany, NZ; WRNZ Air Force # W5652, W6055, WWIIAUS_NZ_USA_Flags

Milton Frederick – W.AUS; RA Army, WWII

Ben Kuroki – Hersey, NE & Camarillo, CA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, ETO, POW & PTO

Eliot Lang – New Plymouth, NZ; RNZ Air Force # 432743, WWII

Vernon McIntyre – Kelmscott, AUS; RA Air Force, WWII

Robert Phillips – Auckland, NZ; RNZ Army # 436394, WWII

William Sievers – AUS; RA Air Force # 425977

Kathleen Wishart – Christchurch, NZ; WRNZ Army Nursing Corps # W242634, WWII

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