Category Archives: Current News

July Fourth 2018

While you enjoy your bar-b-ques and fireworks – take a moment to remember the troops that made it all possible for that to happen today.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY USA !!!

 Ralph Waldo Emerson‘s “Concord Hymn.” It was sung at the completion of the Concord Battle Monument on April 19, 1837.

 

By the rude bridge that arched the flood,
Their flag to April’s breeze unfurled,
Here once the embattled farmers stood,
And fired the shot heard round the world,

The foe long since in silence slept,
Alike the Conqueror silent sleeps,
And Time the ruined bridge has swept
Down the dark stream which seaward creeps.

On this green bank, by this soft stream,
We set to-day a votive stone,
That memory may their deed redeem,
When like our sires our sons are gone.

Spirit! who made those freemen dare
To die, or leave their children free,
Bid time and nature gently spare
The shaft we raise to them and Thee.

If you are setting off fireworks this evening, please be courteous to your neighboring veterans .  Haven’t they heard enough?

 

Take good care of your pets

Click on images to enlarge.

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Fourth of July Humor – or is it?

courtesy of ‘America on Coffee’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

courtesy of: Henry Kotula

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Farewell Salutes –

Hobert Bingham – Alcorn County, MS; USMC, WWII, PTO

James Conway – Sun City, AZ; US Army, WWII, 2nd Lt.

Irving Green –  Mountaindale, NY; US Army Air Corps, WWII, bombardier

Charles Highley Jr. – Glen Ridge, NJ; USMC, WWII, PTO

Lois Jolly –  Hempstead, NY; US Army WAC, WWII, ETO, nurse

Thomas Miller – Norfolk, VA; US Army Air Corps, 152nd AAA/11th Airborne Division

Joseph Rizzi – Bronx, NY; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, CO A/457 Artillery/11th Airborne Divsion

Ray Sarvis – Bessemer City, NC; US Navy, WWII, PTO

Harold Tor – Beach, CA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, Co F/187th/11th Airborne Division

Robert Watz – Westerly, RI; US Army, Korea, Co A/187th RCT

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U.S. Army Birthday & Flag Day 2018

243RD Army Birthday

Headquarters Department of the Army is celebrating the Army’s 243rd birthday during the week of 10-16 June 2018 with numerous ceremonies and events. Highlighted celebrations are Army Day with the Nationals on 10 June; Twilight Tattoo hosted by the Sergeant Major of the Army on 13 June; a wreath laying ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery on 14 June; the Pentagon Army Birthday Celebration also on 14 June; and culminating with the Army Birthday Ball on 16 June 2018.

 

 

Today is also Flag Day, an annual observance of the Second Continental Congress’ official adoption of the stars and stripes in 1777. At the time, they “resolved that the flag of the 13 United States” be represented by 13 alternating red and white stripes and the union by 13 white stars in a blue field, “representing a new constellation.” Now, more than 200 years later and with an updated design, the flag is an American icon.  Unfortunately, Pennsylvania is the only state to recognize it as a legal holiday.

As national treasures go, it was a bargain: $405.90 was paid to Mary Pickersgill of Baltimore, who fashioned it from red, blue and undyed wool, plus cotton for the 15 stars to fly at the fortress guarding the city’s harbor. An enormous flag, 30 by 42 feet, it was intended as a bold statement to the British warships that were certain to come.  And, when in September 1814, the young United States turned back the invaders in a spectacular battle witnessed by Francis Scott Key, he put his joy into a verse published first as “Defense of Fort M’Henry,” and then, set to the tune of a British drinking song – immortalized as “The Star Spangled Banner.”

 

STOP IN AND HEAR THE NATIONAL ANTHEM !!

 

 

If you live outside the U.S., and you also live free – display your flag as proudly as I do mine and enjoy your day!!

 

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Military Humor –

 

‘And this one’s for humor in the line of duty.’

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Farewell Salutes –

Alexander Conrad – Chandler, AZ ; US Army, Somalia, SSgt. 1/3rd Special Ops Forces Group, KIA

James Furcinito – Syracuse, NY; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 11th Airborne Division

Paul Gilman – Belen, NM; USMC, WWII, M/3/8th Marines, KIA (Tarawa)

Leonard Grossman – NYC, NY; US Army, WWII

Delbert Hawkins – Augusta, KS; US Army Air Corps, WWII, ETO

Jack Kill – Yorktown, VA; US Army, WWII

Emil Lake – Great Falls, MT; US Army, Vietnam

Herbert ‘Mac’ McDaniel – Malvern, AR; US Army Air Corps, WWII, ETO, Capt., / Korea, Lt. Col.

Gordon Schofield – Montreal, CAN/FL; US Air Force

Edward Thomas – Minneapolis, MN; US Army, “Bird Dog” pilot

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ARMED FORCES DAY

19 MAY, 2018, BEING ANOTHER PART OF MILITARY APPRECIATION MONTH, IS CALLED ARMED FORCES DAY.

THE FIRST ARMED FORCES DAY WAS CELEBRATED 29 MAY 1950 (one month before the start of the Korean War).  ARMED FORCES WEEK BEGINS ON THE 2ND SATURDAY OF MAY AND ENDS THRU THE 3RD SATURDAY.  Due to their unique schedules, the NATIONAL GUARD & THE RESERVE units may celebrate this at any time during the month.

 

PRESIDENT DWIGHT DAVID EISENHOWER, 1953 –  “Today let us, as Americans, honor the American fighting man.  For it is he or she – the soldier, the sailor, the Airman, the Marine – who has fought to preserve freedom.”

 

If you do NOT normally fly your flag everyday, make this day one that you do!  Even a small one sitting in your window shows your heartfelt feelings toward our troops.

If you are not from the U.S., tell us about the days you honor your military in the fight for freedom – help us to learn by sharing.

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Farewell Salutes – 

Lloyd Backart – Albuquerque, NM; US Army, WWII, PTO, Bronze Star

Donald Carr – San Antonio, TX; US Army, Vietnam, Major, Team 3 Special Forces, KIA

Mildred Eaton – New Orleans, LA; US Navy WAVE, WWII

John Gobbi – Bodega, CA; USMC, WWII, Purple Heart

Michael Healy – Chicago, IL; US Army, Korea, Major (Ret.), 187th RCT

Joseph Mills – Lebanon, KY; US Army, Vietnam (Ret. 22 y.)

Joseph Ranke – Apple Valley, MN; US Army, WWII

Richard Surbaugh – Meadow Creek, WV; US Navy, WWII

Thomas Tight – Ft. Lauderdale, FL; US Army, LT.

Jim Wilke – Griffin, GA; US Army, WWII, 3rd Infantry Division

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Current News – Iwo Jima Remembrance

Hershel “Woody” Williams, Medal of Honor, Iwo Jima

HONOLULU — Seventy-three years ago on the island of Iwo Jima, Hershel “Woody” Williams randomly chose several fellow Marines to give him rifle cover as he made a one-man charge with his flamethrower against a network of Japanese pillboxes.

He spent four hours unleashing flames into the pillboxes that had stymied advance for days, racing back to the Marine Corps lines to refuel the flamethrower, and then running again into battle — all while covered by only four riflemen.

Hershel Williams

Williams was ultimately awarded the Medal of Honor on Feb. 23, 1945, for “conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty,” as the official citation describes it. He “daringly went forward alone to attempt the reduction of devastating machine-gun fire” coming out of reinforced concrete pillboxes, on which bazooka and mortar rounds had no effect.

At one point, Williams mounted a pillbox, stuck the flamethrower’s nozzle through an air vent and killed the enemy within it.  Two of the Marines covering Williams died that day, but he never knew their names, and never knew where their remains rested until just a few months ago.

On Saturday, Williams, with the Medal of Honor hanging around his neck, stood over the Hawaii grave of Charles Fischer, one of those “guardian angels” who helped him survive that day and is buried in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, nicknamed the Punchbowl.  He saluted the Marine, who died a private first class that day, and then slowly bent down and placed a purple lei upon his headstone.

Hershel ‘Woody’ Williams, then and now

“I have always said I’m just the caretaker of it,” Williams said later of the Medal of Honor. “It belongs to them. They sacrificed for it. I didn’t.”
Twenty-seven Medals of Honor were awarded to men who fought on Iwo Jima; Williams is the last still alive.
Williams was in Hawaii to dedicate a Gold Star Families Memorial Monument at the Hawaii State Veterans Cemetery in Kaneohe. The monument was initiated by Williams through the organization he founded, the Hershel Woody Williams Medal of Honor Foundation. This is the foundation’s 33rd monument to be dedicated; they recognize the sacrifices made by families who have lost loved ones in the service of their country.

Punchbowl Cemetery, Honolulu, HI

After the Saturday morning dedication, the 94-year-old Williams visited the Punchbowl Cemetery in Honolulu, where the remains of hundreds of servicemembers who died during World War II are interred.  Patrick O’Leary, a foundation board member whom Williams has dubbed his “research guru,” sleuthed the identity of Fischer by poring through hundreds of military documents concerning the Iwo Jima campaign waged in February and March 1945.

Using five witness statements that had been given in the course of recommending Williams for the Medal of Honor, O’Leary was able to reliably pinpoint the company the riflemen were in and found that only a corporal and private first class had been killed that day.  “It just has to be them,” O’Leary said. “Nothing else fits.”

Hershel Williams

Last fall he tracked down Fischer’s gravesite in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific. The other Marine is buried in Long Island, N.Y.
Williams also visited for the first time the grave of Vernon Waters, a fellow Marine and close friend who died on Iwo Jima.
They had become very close in the lead up to the Iwo Jima campaign, fostering a feeling of devotion in Williams so strong that he ultimately risked court-martial.
While on the island of Guam, Waters and Williams had made a pact that should either of them be killed, the other would return their rings to family members.
William’s girlfriend had given him a ring with a “wee, tiny, little ruby” in it before he left for the Marine Corps.

Click on images to enlarge.

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Personal Request –

Please visit Katrina’s site for honoring our veterans.  My father has been honored there and now a dear old friend.  Thank you.

Sgt Walter “Wally” Morgan Bryant

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Military Humor – 

 

 

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Eark Albert – McAlester, OK; US Army Air Corps, WWII, HQ/457th Arty/11th Airborne Division

Edward Cox – Tampa, FL; US Army Air Corps, WWII & Korea

A soldier from the Army’s 3rd Infantry Regiment, the guardians of Arlington National Cemetery, waits amid the gravestones during funeral services for Army Spc. Sean R. Cutsforth, of Radford, Va., a member of the 101st Airborne who was killed in Afghanistan in December, Thursday, Feb. 24, 2011, at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Frank Fazekas Sr. – Trenton, NJ; US Army Air Corps, WWII, ETO, Lt., P-47 pilot, KIA

Betty Flowers – Bristol, ENG; British Woman’s Air Force WAAF, WWII

William Morris – Broad Channel, NY; US Navy, WWII, Corpsman

Jack Mullins – Sydney, AUS; RA Air Force, WWII

Stanley Serafin – Surprise, AZ; US Army Air Corps, WWII, B-29 technician

Jesse Traywick – Ft. Benning, GA; US Army WWII, PTO, Gen. Wainwright’s aide, POW

Donald Wesley Troy – Midland, TX; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO & CBI, P-40 & P-47 pilot / Korea, P-51, Distinguished Flying Cross

John Zucco – Boston, MA; USMC, WWII, PTO, USS Alaska

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COME ON BROTHER, I’M TAKING YOU HOME

Angel Flight

Angel Flights are the U.S. Air Force planes (C-130’s) used to fly home our Fallen Soldiers.  Angel Flight is also their call sign.  Angel Flights have top priority in the U.S. airspace – Towers will be heard to say, “Number One for landing/take off.”

The Air Force Angel Wing flare pattern is amazing to watch as the flares come out in the shape of an angel wing.  A fitting tribute to bring home our fallen with the respect they have earned.

Please watch and listen to Radney Foster sing the powerful message of “Angel Flight”

During January 2018, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA), accounted for the following U.S. service members:

WWII

Willard H. Aldridge, Seaman 1st Class, USS Oklahoma

Warren H. Crim, Fireman 3rd Class, USS Oklahoma

Eugene P. Ford, 1st Lt., 765th Bombardment Squadron/461st Bombardment Group/15th Air Force

Leonard R. Geller, Fireman 1st Class, USS Oklahoma

Donald G. Keller, Seaman 1st Class, USS Oklahoma

Jack H. Krieger, Pfc, USS Oklahoma

Chester E. Seaton, Fireman 1st Class, USS Oklahoma

Lowell E. Valley, Fireman 2nd Class, USS Oklahoma

Korean War

William C. McDowell, Cpl., Co. D/1st Battalion/32nd Infantry Regiment/7th Infantry Div.

Lamar E. Newman, Pfc, Co. B/1st Battalion/9th Infantry Regiment/ 2nd Infantry Division

Pete W. Simon, Sgt. 1st Class, Co. G/8th Cavalry Regiment

And the search goes on…

A Navy diver guides a salvage basket during an underwater recovery operation searching for World War II remains off the coast of Koror, Palau, Jan. 30, 2018.
TYLER THOMPSON/U.S. NAVY PHOTO

Divers in Palau recover remains linked to missing WWII air crews!

A joint underwater recovery team of soldiers, sailors, airmen and civilians recently completed an intense two-month excavation of sunken World War II airplanes in Palau, retrieving remains that could belong to long-lost American air crews, the Navy said.

Headed by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, the team worked from aboard the USNS Salvor near Ngerekebesang Island, completing work on Feb. 25.

Above information from: “Stars and Stripes” magazine.

Angel Flight information from: 11th Airborne Division Assoc. newspaper, “The Voice of the Angels”

Identifying our missing information from: DPAA/ American Battle Monuments Commission; the DPAA identified 183 service members during the fiscal year of 2017.


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Brig. General Henry Muller – 101 years and still going strong

Henry Muller

This article is derived from “The Voice of the Angels”, the 11th Airborne Division Association newspaper.

It’s not every day that a US Army veteran gets to celebrate surviving an entire century while also being informed of an induction into the exclusive hall of fame for his combat achievements. That is the case with US Army brig. General Henry J. Muller will belong to the Military Intelligence Hall of Fame.

On his 100th birthday, about 40  gathered for the occasion.  They sat under the oaks n the front yard and thumbed through a photo album featuring pictures from past celebrations.  The celebration included a birthday cake bordered with 100 American flags.

Henry Muller with author, Bruce Henderson

“There’s nothing that could warn the heart of an old soldier more than on his 100th birthday than to be surrounded with family, friends and good neighbors… I feel especially blessed.”

Among those there that day was US Army Capt. Antoinette Deleon, to interview him for his induction into the Hall of Fame at Fort Huacheua, Arizona.  “It’s an honor for me to come here…”

Gen. Muller w/ the Capt. from Military Intelligence

Bruce Henderson, author of the best seller, “Rescue at Los Baños: The Most Daring Prison Camp Raid of World War II”, said, “Just think about it, I mean even today if there was a raid like that saving that many lives, it would be big news.  He (Muller) went beyond his duties as an intelligence officer – it was the real human being in him.”

Brigadier General Henry J. Muller was inducted on 22-23 June 2017 for his service as a Lt. Colonel, G-2 of the 11th Airborne Division during WWII.

Los Banos commemoration stamp

Click on images to enlarge.

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Military Humor – 

 

 

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Robert Boas – brn: FRA; US Army, WWII, ETO, interpreter

Robert Cassidy Sr. – New Haven, CT; US Navy, WWII, ETO, LCVP Commander

Don Frazier – NV; US Army, WWII, gunnery instructor

Richard ‘Corky’ Holden – New Port Richie, FL; USMC, WWII, ETO, 2nd Division

Leroy Jones – Miami, AZ; US Navy, WWII, Seaman 1st Class

Judson Landers – Baton Rouge, LA; US Navy, WWII, PTO, corpsman

Richard Logan – Harrodsburg, KY; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 11th Airborne Division

Sheldon Silverman – Chicago, IL; US Army Air Corps, WWII, Pvt.

Joseph Talbot – AUS; RA Air Force # 122912, WWII

Orville Thomas – Eldon, IA; US Army (Ret. 23 y.)

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Current News from: “Stars and Stripes”

FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. (Tribune News Service) — The flag is in surprisingly good shape for its age.

Made at least 100 years ago, the red, white and blue have only slightly faded. The 48 stars remain neatly in place. The edges are slightly frayed, and a few small moth holes dot the banner.  But there is no more important family treasure for Patty Kelly Stevens and her relatives.  This American flag has been a reward, a sign of hope and a reminder of love and loss.

Now, for the first time in a century, the flag has left the family. On Friday, Stevens – now 93 years old – and dozens of family members made the trek from Oklahoma to North Carolina to donate the flag to the Airborne & Special Operations Museum in downtown Fayetteville.

The flag – once presented to the family by Maj. Gen. Leonard Wood – has survived fire, war and time itself. And now, it will be forever preserved.  “It’s not just a U.S. flag…,” said Jim Bartlinski, director of the museum. “The story behind it is incredible.  We have an obligation to care for that flag until the end of time.”

During World War II, Stevens’ mother, Selma Croft, hid the flag under threat of death as the family was held prisoner for three years in the Philippines.

Airborne & Special Forces Museum

The flag – which briefly flew over the Los Baños Internment Camp – became a symbol of hope for the prisoners there in the weeks before a daring raid to rescue them.  And in the decades since, it has honored the caskets of several family members – including veterans and survivors of Los Baños.

“The flag means so much to me,” Stevens said. “To all of us… to my family.”

The flag’s story begins long before the war.

Alfred J. Croft, Stevens’ father, was a self-taught pilot who served in World War I and had come to the Philippines in 1918 to help train Filipino flyers. There, he met Selma, who came to the islands as a nurse in 1919.  The two married and lived in China and then Hawaii – where Stevens was born – before returning to Manila.

At a carnival in the early 1920s, Alfred Croft rescued the flag from a fire that had engulfed the event. Wood, then governor-general of the Philippines, was so impressed that he awarded the flag to Croft.

They lived an easy life in the Philippines, Stevens said.  But that changed on Dec. 8, 1941, a day after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.  Selma Croft was awakened at 5:30 a.m. that day with news of the attack. Her husband was working in Hawaii at the time.

Stevens and her younger brother, William, were sent home from school early. And on that same day, the Japanese began bombing the island.   “We were not prepared for war,” Stevens recalled. The troops in the Philippines had World War I-era equipment. And they took heavy casualties as Japanese forces overran the islands.

On Jan. 6, 1942, the war reached the family’s doorstep. Stevens was 17, months from graduating high school and moving to California.

But Japanese soldiers ordered her to put her life on hold. They demanded that the family pack enough food and clothing for three days.

“The three days lasted three years and two months,” Stevens said.

Unbeknownst to Stevens, her mother packed the family’s American flag with her things. For three years, Selma Croft would keep the flag hidden – probably by hiding it in a mattress, Stevens reckons.

Stevens, speaking to a group of family and veterans at the Airborne & Special Operations Museum, related how her family was held first at the University of Santo Tomas in Manila. There were 6,000 prisoners on the campus.

As Santo Tomas grew more crowded, the Japanese sent prisoners to build another camp on the island of Luzon – a camp that would become known as the Los Baños Internment Camp.

Stevens’ story

Stevens said her brother – then 14 years old – was sent to help build the camp. He would never be the same, she said.

Meanwhile, Stevens and her mother stayed at Santo Tomas. As the war waged on, conditions became worse.  “They had a saying,” Stevens said. “‘When victorious, we can be generous.'”

As food rations shrank and abuse rose, Stevens said prisoners realized that American troops must be getting close.  After nearly three years in prison, Stevens said she and her mother were taken to Los Baños.

“We thought it was going to be better,” she said. “It wasn’t.”  At Los Baños, the prisoners were surrounded by jungle.  “We could look across the fence and see bananas on the trees,” Stevens said. “But we couldn’t get there.”

On Jan. 7, 1945, the prisoners received an unexpected surprise. As the inhabitants of the camp awoke, they realized that their captors had unexpectedly left them unattended.  The soldiers had been called away to a battle in Manila, Stevens said. Prisoners ran about the camp shouting “We’re free! We’re free!”

Amid the celebration, Selma Croft took her flag out of hiding and offered it to be raised over the prison camp.

“I had no idea she had it,” Stevens said. “We sang the ‘Star Spangled Banner’ and ‘God Save the Queen.’ ”
Some of the stronger men left the camp to get food from a nearby village. Others broke into the Japanese food stores.

But even with no guards, most of the 2,000 prisoners – both civilians and troops – were unable to leave.  “We were afraid. We had no place to go,” Stevens said. “We couldn’t get away.”

When Japanese guards returned a week later, they repeatedly asked about the flag.  For three days, the guards searched prisoners’ barracks trying to find it.

Stevens recalled eating pigweed and brush. “Anything just to stay alive,” she said.  Prisoners could see Allied planes overhead, but they worried that any rescue would come too late.

“They had already dug the ditches for the bodies,” Stevens said.

On the early morning of Feb. 23, 1945, help fell from the sky – angels in parachutes.

As Filipino guerillas attacked from the ground, U.S. troops with the 11th Airborne Division came from the sky.

“It was the happiest day of my life,” Stevens said. “To see those paratroopers come.”

With bullets flying, the family hid under their beds. But the Allied forces quickly overran the Japanese guards.

Stevens said her freedom came with the sound of footsteps as one of the soldiers entered the barracks.

“Are you a Marine?,” she asked.

“Hell no. I’m not a Marine. I’m a paratrooper,” the man responded.

Iron Mike

Stevens said she can never repay the paratroopers who rescued her and others. That’s why it’s perfect to pass the flag to the Airborne & Special Operations Museum.

“I wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for the airborne,” she said.

The donation – officially made on the 73rd anniversary of the Los Baños Raid – will be displayed through the weekend in the museum lobby, Bartlinski said.

Then officials will begin the needed steps to conserve the flag before putting it back on display in time for Flag Day in June. It will remain on display through July 4 and will eventually have a permanent home in the museum’s main exhibit hall.

Paul Kelly, Stevens’ son, said his family was willing to risk their lives to keep the flag. And he’s now encouraged that the museum will ensure it lasts forever.

“It’s not perfect,” he said of the 100-year-old flag. “But hell, what is?”

Click on images to enlarge.

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Military Humor – 

 

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Richard Adams – Connersville, IN; US Army, Vietnam, 101st Airborne Division

Derald Bickford – Lincoln, NE; US Army, 82nd Airborne Division (Ret.)

Herbert Chancey Jr. – Chattanooga, TN; US Army, Vietnam, A Co/22 Regimen, Ranger

Leslie Colgrove – Fort Sumner, NM; US Army, 173rd Airborne Division, Lt. Col. (Ret. 22 y.)

Lewis Gilbert – Hackney, London, ENG; Royal Air Force, WWII, film unit

“Duke” Hipp – Nyssa, OR; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 11th Airborne Division, Purple Heart

Lawrence Lodewick – Alexandria, VA; US Army, West Point grad, 82nd Airborne Division, Bronze Star, Col. (Ret. 22 y.)

Leroy Murray – Springfield, MA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, CMSgt. (Ret.)

Eugene Roy – Dorens, KY; US Army, 11th Airborne Division

Howard Weger – Strawberry Point, IA; US Army Air Corps, WWII

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Current News – Bataan Mile Markers

Bataan mile marker, before and after.

CLARK AIR BASE, Philippines – Jungle moss and roadwork are threatening historical markers along the Bataan Death March trail in the Philippines, says an American who’s waging a lonely battle to preserve them.

Bob Hudson’s father, Tech. Sgt. Richard Hudson, was among tens of thousands of troops forced to march nearly 70 miles from the Bataan Peninsula to Japanese prisoner-of-war camps after the surrender of U.S. and Filipino forces on April 9, 1942. Thousands perished during the trek, which included intense heat and harsh treatment from the guards.

Bataan Death March

The government of former Philippines president Ferdinand Marcos installed the first markers — made of metal — along the path in the 1960s, Hudson told a group of veterans last month in Angeles City, Philippines. In 2000, the Filipino-American Memorial Endowment, or FAME — an organization seeking to preserve the nation’s war memorials — replaced them with 139 white concrete markers.

Bob & Rosalie Hudson

Those markers are sturdier than the old ones, some of which were stolen as souvenirs or sold for scrap metal. But the inexorable growth of the surrounding jungle and the tropical heat and humidity are taking a toll on them.

“These markers require a lot of maintenance,” Hudson said.  Since 2012, he and his wife, Rosalie, have spent many weekends along the Death March trail pulling weeds and cleaning and repainting the markers, which quickly get covered in mold and moss.

Rosalie Hudson working.

Hudson said he started the work to honor his late father, who on his death bed asked his son to track down a daughter he left behind in the Philippines during the war.

The elder Hudson — who survived the death march, a voyage to Japan in a “hell ship,” forced labor in a mine and the atomic bombing of Nagasaki — returned to the Philippines to look for his fiancé after the war. He found out that she had been raped and murdered by Japanese troops, and that their daughter had been adopted.

The younger Hudson moved to the Philippines in 2012 and tracked down the children of his half-sister, Leonida Hudson Cortes. Though he learned that she died in 1999, his work on the Death March markers continues.

A local power company is helping maintain 11 markers at the start of the trail, and the Veterans of Foreign Wars post in Angeles City is looking after the final seven. Hudson said that leaves 1

“I’m almost 70 years old,” he said. “It is getting to be a difficult project for me.”

Recent damage to some of the markers by road workers hasn’t made it easier, he said.

FAME provides the couple with paint and the VFW recently donated some money to help fund the project. Those who want to help can find more information at: http://filipino-americanmemorials.org/donate/

Article is from Stars and Stripes magazine.

Click on images to enlarge.

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More Current News – you up for the challenge?

A Special Request (2018 Navy SEAL Swim/Ruck Challenge)
This summer, 6 June 2018 to be specific and during part of the annual D-Day remembrance festivities a very unique and special event will take place:  The 2018 Navy SEAL Swim/Ruck Challenge.  A friend of the Sons of Liberty Museum and the Army Air Corps Library and Museum and an active duty SEAL, will take part in this event and along with 24 other participants will swim in the English Channel, climb cliffs on Omaha Beach and Ruck to St. Lo. this event supports our friends of the Navy SEAL Museum and Trident House in Fort Pierce, FL.  Read More & Support This Event

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Military Humor –

 

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Bryce Blakely Jr. – Orleans, MA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, ETO, gunner, 828/485/15th AF

John Cunningham – San Francisco, CA; US Navy, WWII & Korea

Thomas Evans – Buffalo, NY; US Navy, WWII, APO, radioman

Gunnar Frey Jr. – Des Moines, IA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, 12th Air Force

Cop Howard – Whangamata, NZ; NZ Army # 230124, WWII

Marion Jenkins – Portland, ME; US Coast Guard, WWII

Alex Littlefield – Daytona Beach, FL; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, pilot

James ‘Bill’ Majors – Fort Payne, AL; US Navy, WWII, ETO

Guillermo Green-Sanchez – Coamo, PR; US Army, WWII, Korea, Sgt.FC

Stanley Stegnerski – Gastomia, NC; US Army Air Corps, WWII. ETO, 2nd Lt., P-51 pilot, KIA

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Christmas Wishes for ALL

TO ALL THOSE WHO BELIEVE IN PEACE  HAVE A VERY MERRY CHRISTMAS !!!

REMEMBER THOSE WHO HELPED TO GIVE YOU FREEDOM!!!

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AND THOSE WHO CONTINUE TO KEEP US SAFE!!!

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Military Humor – 

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Albert Atkins – Belvidere, NJ; US Army, Korea, Co. E/2nd/187th RCT, KIA

Mary (Sweet) Brown (103) – Tauranga, NZ; WA Air Force # 2031332, WWII

Ronald Burditt – NV; US Army, Korea, communications

Jack Downhill – Rochester, NY; US Army Air Corps, WWII, Korea, Vietnam, Lt.Col. (Ret. 28 y.)

Joseph Elliot – Los Angeles, CA; US Navy, WWII, Korea, Lt.Commander (Ret. 23 y.)

Richard Grimm – Athens, GA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 187/11th Airborne Division

Andrew McGarry (100) – Milton, OK; US Navy, WWII

Robert Newcomb (100) – Honolulu, HI; US Navy, WWII, PTO / Korea, Cmdr. (Ret. 20 y.)

Kenneth Reth – Racine, WI; US Army, WWII, ETO, tank battalion

Maurice Ritter – Cockeysville, MD; US Navy, WWII, USS Naukesa

Lones Wigger Jr. – Carter, MT; Vietnam, Lt.Colonel (Ret. 27 y.), Olympic Gold winner

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Thanksgiving – Then and Now

I wish to express my thanks to each and every one of you !!

thanksgiving-army-navy-forever-560x420

For those of you living where there is no official Thanksgiving Day – look around – family, friends, Freedom and life itself – all enough to give thanks for each day !

Thanksgiving during WWII…

They’re celebrating Thanksgiving on this very day,
My thoughts are at home, though I’m far away;
I can see everyone, eating dinner deluxe,
Whether it be chicken, turkey or even duck;
The fellows over here won’t whimper or moan,
They’ll look to the next one and hope to be home.
 
Truly and honestly, from way down deep,
They want you to be happy and enjoy your feast.
These holidays are remembered by one and all,
Those happy days we can always recall.
The ones in the future, will be happier, I know
When we all come back from defeating the foe.

_______Poem by an Anonymous WWII Veteran

Please remember the troops that gave you freedom and those that protect it each day !!

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… and please be considerate to those who may not be celebrating…

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Military Thanksgiving Humor – 

 

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Shirley Baltz – Hammonton, NJ; US Navy WAVES, WWII

Sam Cartner – Asheville, NC; US Army Air Corps, WWII, B-24 tail gunner

Edward Ferguson – Petersburg, IL; US Army, WWII, Korea

courtesy of Cora Metz poster designs.wordpress.cm/, US Army

William Gray – Kent, WA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, ETO, LT., 391/366th Fighter Group. KIA

Charles ‘Hap’ Holladay – Cookeville, TN; US Army Air Corps, WWII, meterologist

Henry Karwas – MI; USMC, WWII, PTO

William Richardson – Ivey, GA; US Army, WWII, 95th Division

Melvin Stone – Portland, ME; US Army, WWII, ETO, 187th Combat Engineers

Mel Tillis – Pahokee, FL; US Air Force

Harold Tor – Huntington Beach, CA, US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 11th Airborne Division, Purple Heart

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