Monthly Archives: April 2014

Going Home

Before we head into WWII once again, I wanted to show some of the more recent readers one of the many reasons why I write this web site…

Pacific Paratrooper

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Gradually, the men of the 11th Airborne Division would earn their points to be shipped back home and they would allow the fresh, green G.I.’s to take their place in the occupation of Japan.

Click on any photo to enlarge.

Everett (Smitty) Smith would return to Broad Channel, New York to restart his civilian life in February 1946. He gradually got to know Lillian Barrow during his morning rides on the bus, going to his job and he would chuckle whenever he related that story. Despite my mother’s protests, he would relate that he knew why Lillian was always on the same bus with him, but she was being coy. “I was just going to work myself,” my mother argued. Smitty would reply, “Then how do you explain that your job was in the opposite direction than the bus was going? You didn’t know that I was aware of that…

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Intermission Stories (15)

Earl Hufford in Korea

Earl Hufford in Korea

Private First Class, Earl R. Hufford

11th Evacuation Hospital, Medical Corps, Korea

Earl R. Hufford hailed from Perrysburg, Ohio.  He went to Bowling Green State University and received his preacher’s license for the Methodist church after high school and then found himself drafted into the U.S. Army destined for Korea.  The following article is condensed from an interview he gave the Library of Congress’ Veterans History Project.

At one point, he was sent to a MASH unit:  “If you ever watch M*A*S*H* on television, that’s the way it is.”  Earl’s aptitude for things medical landed him in a series of courses and even learned how to do autopsies.  We even had a Klinger.”   Earl R. Hufford was a medic.

Earl Hufford w/ the 11th Evac hospital

Earl Hufford w/ the 11th Evac hospital

It took several days to get to Korea aboard ship.  He had a tendency to become so seasick, he buddies would bring him fruit to eat.  He would then have to be tied in to stand his guard  or he’d fall overboard.  At first, he was sent to Inchon, but the army still wasn’t quite certain what to do with him; they made him a chaplain’s assistant and he started a newspaper for the 11th Evac. hospital.

After Inchon, he was sent to Wonju along with the rest of the 11th and even ran the first dialysis machine invented (the other one was in Germany).  “I felt bad for the — real bad for the wounded and I felt bad for their families.   But I just did my job and I thought I did it pretty good.  You have to move on to the next person…there’s no time for sentiment…I always said a prayer for them.”

Hufford (on right) w/ friend at the the 11th

Hufford (on right) w/ friend at the the 11th

The 11th Evacuation hospital also went North and took care of the North Korean wounded because they had no facilities, the wounded were left to die.  They even built them a hospital, but they didn’t return the favor.  Hufford spoke of having to remove their Red Cross sign because it made them too much of a target for the enemy.

 There were a lot of hemorrhagic fever patients to take care of too. (the fever, caused by rats, makes a person bleed internally).  “I felt very fortunate on saving those boy’s lives.  We had a lot of rats.

a later photo of Earl Hufford

a later photo of Earl Hufford

After 15 months, Earl Hufford returned home.  “And it was wonderful to see the Golden Gate Bridge.  But, I’m not sorry that I was there, because I’d do it all over again.

The final line of his interview stated, “I dedicate this tape to all the veterans and servicemen and women in service today and may God bless them all.

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Farewell Salutes – 

A Farewell Salute

A Farewell Salute

Clarence Anderson – Ogden, Iowa; US Army Air Corps, WWII, Lt. Col. (Ret.)

Maurice Archer – Greenbay, VA; US Army, WWII

John Debalek, Jr. – Chicago, IL; US Army, WWII, ETO, 745th Tank Battalion/1st Infantry Division

Larry DeCelles – Kansas City & Phoenix, AZ; US Army Air Corps, WWII

Dennis Gavin – Wanganui, NZ; RNZ Navy # C/SSX16068, WWII, ETO

John Hogel – Sultan, WA; USMC, WWII, PTO

Fred Moss – Holiday Island, AR; USMC, WWII

Dante Romano – Sun City W., AZ; US Army Air Corps, WWII

John Spinella – W.Palm Beach, FL; US Army, Vietnam

John Towers – Oak Brook, IL; US Air Force, Korea

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ANZAC Day

AnzacSmokoItineraryMainWithTurkeyHighlightsAnzacDay-50911243424180_800_600

 

In honor of the Australian and New Zealand soldiers who have fought in numerous wars for their freedoms and the rights of others; 25 April is the designated date for memorial ceremonies and tributes.  My apologies for being a day late in this post.

 

ANZACs hard at work

ANZAC’s hard at work

There are ceremonies for the ANZAC’s and there are poems, but I believe this says it all…

Ode of Remembrance

ShowImage - CopyThey shall grow not old, as we are left grow old;ShowImage - Copy (2)
Age will not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning,
We will remember them.
 
 
Gone but not forgotten

Gone but not forgotten

The Spirit of ANZAC

The Spirit of ANZAC

 

Remembrance

Remembrance

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click on images to enlarge.

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Farewell Salutes – 

Douglas Belsham – Whakatane, NZ; RNZ Air Force # 78699

The Missing Man formation

The Missing Man formation

Glen Constantine – Lake Worth, FL; 101st Air Calvary Division, Vietnam

Stephen Fookes – Auckland, NZ; RNZ Air Force # S92108, F/S ACFT Technician

Tresham Gregg – Cape Town, So. Afr.; 3 Royal Tank Reg., Colonel, WWII, ETO

Willie Johnson – Green Forest, AR; US Navy, WWII, ETO, USS Kassan Bay

George Kortas – Antioch, IL; US Army, WWII, 60th Regiment/9th Infantry Div., Bronze Star & 3 Purple Hearts

Les Langdon – Tasmania, AU; RAAF, WWII, PTO & ETO

Donald Martyn – Toronto, Can; WWII, ETO, HMCS Kootenay, navigator’s yeoman

Jerald Nine, Sr. – Dale City, VA; US Army, Korea, medic

George Richardson – Palmerston,  North, NZ; RNZ Air Force # 71261, WWII, LAC No. 14 (F) Squadron

Damian Roche – Sydney, AU; RAR, Brigadier (Ret. 35 years)

Vincent Schindler – Iona, MN; US Navy, Korea, USS Eversole

Alfred Watt – Darwin, AU; RA Artillery, Colonel, WWII; Korea w/ the 163rd NZ Field Battery

Frank Watts – Renton, WA; US Navy, WWII

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Comrades – Ken Moore

 

New Zealand troops fire a 25-pounder at Kapyong, Korea

New Zealand troops fire a 25-pounder at Kapyong, Korea

My own ANZAC Day post is scheduled for tomorrow, but once I read this…..

75(nz)squadron

On ANZAC day, I thought it was fitting to re-post this poem. It felt a little strange, almost uncommfortable to be removing the airmen from the Roll of Honour to present a purely RNZAF and RAAF list for my previous ANZAC day post, so perhaps to make amends and remind us that the boys flew and died together, irrespective of their nationalities I represent ‘Comrades‘, by Ken Moore.

New Zealand gave a Squadron of Planes
When Britain’s need was dire
Both countries sons made up the crews
And they flew through hell and fire.

To the Pommy lads the Kiwi’s made
A gesture that was grand
They gave them honorary citizenship
Of their own beloved land.

Under New Zealand’s flag, they proudly flew
Comrades of the air
They lived and died, as side by side
Fate’s lot they chose to share.

In Wellingtons, Stirlings, then Lancasters
To the…

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Intermission Stories (14)

(Top): Lt. Lewis Wood on right in Korea (Bottom): A Korean valet assigned to Baker Co.

(Top): Lt. Lewis Wood on right in Korea
(Bottom): A Korean valet assigned to Baker Co.

W. Lewis Wood, Jr.

Baker Company/179th Infantry Regiment/45th Division

This story is from the “I Was There” series in the History Channel magazine, January/February 2012 issue.  It is not condensed or edited in any way.  

Pullin’ a Hank Snow: ‘I’m Moving On’

During the winter of 1951-1952, I served as platoon leader with Baker Company of the 179th Infantry Regiment, 45th Division on the front in Korea.  One of the most popular ballads of the day was entitled, “I’m Moving On” by country music star Hank Snow.  Since many of the men of Baker Company, including myself, called Tennessee home, we had adopted the theme “Hank Snow” to use in radio communications.

In order to maintain radio silence we could use phrases such as “I’m pulling a Hank Snow” or “The enemy is using a Hank Snow to the rear” or “You better get your Hank Snow going.”  These phrases were used to indicate movement of one kind or another, and although the Chinese could hear our radio messages, “Hank Snow” was a code word they could never decipher.

(Left): Soldiers take a break at company HQ in Korea (Right): A pair of disabled M-17 tanks in a valley below the platoon's defenses.

(Left): Soldiers take a break at company HQ in Korea
(Right): A pair of disabled M-17 tanks in a valley below the platoon’s defenses.

Another code word was “Hank Williams,” who was famous for many country music songs, but was especially noted for his ballad “On Top of Old Smokey.”  So, any time one of our units wished to indicate their position, they could signal the code word “Hank Williams” which meant they had occupied the crest of a hill.  We also used other country music stars that were famous for lyrics such as “Down in the Valley” or “St. James Infirmary.”

One of our wiremen from the communications section, Pvt. Eddie Kohl, was an excellent guitarist and country singer.  He would help us come up with appropriate lyrics and the name of the singer most related to the song, whose name we could use as our code word for particular messages.  Kohl was an excellent soldier.  He so loved the military that he later volunteered for the U.S. Marines and served with distinction in Vietnam.

W. Lewis Wood, Jr. is from Germantown, Tenn.

Click on any image to view full size.

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Dan Blocker as Hos Cartwright

Dan Blocker as Hos Cartwright

Dan Blocker's High School Yearbook photo

Dan Blocker’s High School Yearbook photo

 

In continuing to research the 179th Infantry Regiment/45th Division, I discovered a well-known and beloved actor who also served with them in Korea.   As part of F Company/2nd Battalion/179th Infantry Reg, Dan Blocker, better known as Hoss Cartwright on “Bonanza”, was a Sergeant who gallantly received a Purple Heart for his wounds incurred during combat.

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Farewell Salutes – 

Maria “Angie” Arreola – Mesa, AZ; USMCwar-on-terror01

John E. Benz – Palm Beach, FL; US Navy, WWII

James Cox – Chicago, IL; US Navy, WWII

John C. Fisher – Waihi, NZ; RNZ Air Force # 81913 & Royal British AF # 3528335

Walter Glanc – Toronto, Can. (born in Russia); RAF Polish Air Squadron, WWII

Ervin Dayton Hand – Fayetteville, AR; US Navy, WWII, aviator, USS Randolph

William Kaufman, Jr. – Seattle, WA; US Air Force, Colonel (Ret.)

Richard Mathieu – Annapolis, MD; US Navy, WWII, aviation ordnance

Murl Orr – W.Palm Beach, FL; US Navy, WWII, captain’s talker aboard a minesweeper, PTO

Manuel Rojas – Long Beach, CA; US Army Air Corps, 187th RCT, WWII, PTO

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Intermission Stories (13)

Conrad "Connie" Grimshaw in Korea

Conrad “Connie” Grimshaw in Korea

Conrad “Connie” Grimshaw

213th Armored Field Artillery Battalion

Conrad Grimshaw joined the National Guard in 1947 at Beaver, Utah.  When he was ordered to Korea, it was with the 213th Armored Field Artillery Battalion from Cedar City, Utah in July 1950.

In his memoirs he remembered,  “Kapyong [Korea] was quite a pretty place with streams of water coming out of the hills in two directions and flowing to the Han River on the south side of the valley.  Our firing batteries were placed up in the canyons to the north and east.  These canyons were very steep and seemed to me to be a cross between Bakers Canyon and the Big Twist in Utah, with only one road in.  This made it difficult and very easy to get trapped.  Next to our artillery batteries were units from the 6th ROK and the Australian infantry.  We spent a lot of time in this area.

The Kapyong Valley

The Kapyong Valley

“On one of the ammo runs up the main road of Chunchon, we spotted a big truck down by the water’s edge.  We told the motor section about it because we were always looking for truck parts to keep everything running.  She looked pretty bad because it had been an old 2-boom wrecker that had been rebuilt at the Tooele Army Dept.  It got the name “Old Never Run”, but before long the boys had it started and running.

“On 21 April, the CCF started the spring offensive and began to push south of the 38th parallel.  We were in the middle of the push.  Not long after we had set up Service Battery, our firing batteries were pulled out of Kapyong canyon and moved to an area by the Hwachon Reservoir above Chunchon.  The first artillery rounds were fired by B Battery the next day.  Later, they were moved back to stop the Chinese push against the Australians and ROKs.

“Around 9pm that night, W.O. Puffer came to me and said that Capt. James had ordered him to go up to HQ and find out if we were to pull back.  He wanted me to drive him up there.  I drove a ¾ ton weapons carrier with Roy Puffer as the only passenger.  I would say that going up the canyon with all the South Korean soldiers pouring out of the hills was like driving through a herd of sheep.  W.O. Puffer was given instructions to have Service Battery move back as needed to safer ground.

213th Armored Field Artillery

213th Armored Field Artillery

“We got as much as we could, but we were forced to leave behind a 105 howitzer and a half track, as well as a stack of C rations and some ammo trailers filled with ammunition.  I heard later that the Australians got the C rations and the retreating firing batteries used up the ammo.  They then hooked up the trailers and brought them down to us.  We lost the howitzer when it slipped off the road’s edge and onto a rocky ledge…we had to leave it behind.”

Connie Grimshaw’s story shows how each job compliments the other and each one is important.  He returned home in July 1951.  This story was found in the Korean War Educator Memoirs and condensed.

Click on images to enlarge.

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Farewell Salutes – 

John Bartley, Jr. – Amesbury, MA; US Navy, WWII, airplane engine mechanic

Med-Evac

Med-Evac

Leonard Cousins – Chicago, IL; US Army, WWII

Everette Frye, Sr. – Richmond, VA; US Army, Korea, MD

Katherine Jamison (92) – Washington D.C.; Intelligence Research Specialist

James Manning – Washington D.C.; US Army, Colonel (Ret.), WWII

Fritz McClory – W.Palm Beach, FL; US Air Force (20 years), Korea & Vietnam

John W. Murray – Waikato, NZ; British Merchant Seaman, WWII

Guy Robertson – Brisbane, Australia; RA Infantry, Major (Ret.) & Queens Own Rifles of Canada; Vietnam

John Trussell – Cleburne, TX; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 127th Engineers

Francis Vogelman – Philadelphia, PA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 511th Regiment

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Easter 1950’s Style

A child's Easter card from the '50s

A child’s Easter card from the ’50s

 

I wish ALL who pass by here to have a wonderful weekend, no matter what your religious belief – we are ALL one.  I hope this site enhances your memories or knowledge of the eras I speak of and you will try to Remember.  I sincerely Thank each and everyone of you for your past and hopefully future cooperation.  HAPPY EASTER, FOLKS!!!

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Typical ads in the '50s

Typical ads in the ’50s

Ready to take that Easter picture '50s style?

Ready to take that Easter picture ’50s style?

 

 

 

 

Fancy baking in the '50s!!

Fancy baking in the ’50s!!

Have a 1950's Doris Day kind of Easter?

Have a 1950’s Doris Day kind of Easter

 

Observe a Passover seder.

Observe a Passover seder.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BUT, NEVER FORGET WHAT THOUSANDS OF OTHERS WENT THROUGH SO THAT YOU COULD HAVE ONE TODAY!!

 

Captain Emil Kapaun, Chaplain, POW, Hero; Korean War

Captain Emil Kapaun, Chaplain, POW, Hero; Korean War

Men from many countries fought for you.

Men from many countries fought for you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Further information on Father Kapaun can be located at my site which will lead you to Wiki.

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Farewell Salutes – 

Bernie Alwill – Bullard, TX; US Army Air Corps, WWII, E Co/187th Reg/11th A/B, PTO

George “Bill” Bullock – Little Compton, RI & Juno, FL; US Navy, WWII, signalman16292

Walter “Jim” Hillyer – Christchurch, NZ; Serv.# 275956, 23rd Battalion, WWII

Lathrop Hoffman – South Bend, IN; US Army, WWII, 1stLt., Burma-China Theater

Frank Nowobilski – Tinley Park, IL; US Army, Korea

Gerry Presley – Palm Beach Gardens, FL; US Army, Vietnam

Mark Schindler – Addison, PA; US Army; Korea, Cpl.

Kenneth Toy – Montreal, Can.; Royal Canadian Army, WWII

Katherine Vorel – Downers Grove, IL; WAVES, WWII

Sir Owen (Arthur) Woodhouse – Auckland, NZ; RNZNVR

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Intermission Stories (12)

 

Veterans_Day-thanks

Today’s post will in no way be rewritten or condensed by me.  These are short tributes found in various locations to honor the men of three different wars.  Please click on each story to read, they took the time for you.  Thank you.

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WWII update story_____

WWII pilot

WWII pilot

Story from the AARP bulletin.

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Korean War update ______

Distinguished Service Cross recipient

Distinguished Service Cross recipient

From Home of the Heroes.com ( complete citation lists are available at this site).

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A famous Vietnam story ______

Cmdr. Jeremiah Denton, Jr.

Cmdr. Jeremiah Denton, Jr.

This story was taken from the The Week magazine obituaries.

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Farewell Salutes – 

Stanley Brundage – Newark, NJ & W.Palm Bch., FL; US Army, WWII< cryptologist

Thomas Coules – Hartland, WI; US Air Force, Lt., Korea

National Army (AK) Medallion, "Ryngraf"

National Army (AK) Medallion, “Ryngraf”

Charles Hazen (98) – Annadale, VA; US Army, Colonel (Ret.)

Leonard Jagla – Glenview, IL; US Army, WWII

Christina Kloss – Krakow, Poland & D.C.; WWII, National Army (AK) Underground Resistance, National Army Medallion

Tony Merritt – Calgary, Canada; Canadian Forces 27 years

Jack Raleigh – Papatoetoe, NZ; RNZ Air Force, WWII, # NZ413613

Wilton Remelius – Oklahoma City, OK; US Navy, WWII, USS Hector

Alexander Schmidt – Sunnyside, FL; US Army, WWII, artillery

Patrick Tully, Jr. – Chicago, IL & Bradenton, FL; US Army, Vietnam

Louis Vella – Palos, Heights, IL; US Army, WWII

Click on images to enlarge.

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Intermission Stories (11)

Sgt. Brian Cooper & Cpl. Ron Walker  on Hill 111 just after the armistice

Sgt. Brian Cooper & Cpl. Ron Walker on Hill 111 just after the armistice

 

Corporal Ron Walker enlisted in the Royal Australian Regiment at the age of 17, July 1951 in Perth, WA.  Both of his brothers were veterans of the Korean War.  Having fought on Hill 159, in the “Bowling Alley” and Hill 111, Walker’s vivid memories in his memoirs  are the songs of the times: “Jumbalaya” -Teresa Brewer, “Moving On” – Hank Snow, “Vaia Con Dios” – Doris Day… and also the American band at Pusan playing “Waltzing Matilda.”  But here we will remember the poems he wrote that express more emotion than long stories are capable of ______

Hook area, Korean War

Hook area, Korean War

KOREAN LAMENT

Just over the Manchurian border, Korea is the spot,
We are doomed to our lifetime, in this land that God forgot.
Down with the snakes and lizards, down where the men are few,
Right in the middle of nowhere and a helluva way from home too.
 
We swear, we sweat, we grumble; it’s more than we can stand,
We’re not a bunch of convicts, but defenders of our land.
We are soldiers of an active force drawing our monthly pay,
Defending our people and country for thirty three bob a day.
 
Living on our memories or our lovin’ waiting gals,
hoping that while we’re away, they haven’t married pals.
The time we spent in the Army, the good times that we missed,
Boys, we hope the draft don’t get you, for God’s sake don’t enlist.
 
Now when we get to heaven, St. Peter will surely yell:
They’re REOS from Korea Lord and they’ve see enough of hell!
2RAR trench collapses after bombardment

2RAR trench collapses after bombardment

 
 
A KOREAN HILLSIDE
 
There is blood on the hills of Korea,
’tis the blood of the brave and the true.
Where the nations they battle together,
Beneath the banners of red, white and blue.
As we marched o’er the hills of Korea,
To the hills where the enemy lay.
 
We remember our general’s orders,
Those hills must be taken today.
So forward we went into battle,
Our faces unsmiling and stern.
For we know as we charge that hillside,
There are many who shall never return.
 
Some thought of their wives and sweethearts,
Some thought of their mothers so fair.
Yet others who plodded and stumbled,
Were softly saying a prayer.
There is blood on the hills of Korea,
’tis the cost of the freedom we love.
May their names live in glory forever,
While their souls rest in heaven above.
 

Ron Walker continued to serve in the military after the armistice, including the Bomb Search and Disposal Squad in Brisbane.  He was discharged on 1 July 1957.  This story was taken from Korean War Online.com.

Click on images to enlarge.

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Farewell Salutes – 

Robert Braid – Wilmington, MA; US Army WWII

Edward L. Callahan – Sherman, TX & Los Angeles, CA; US Army, WWII

Signal Corps Regimental Colors

Signal Corps Regimental Colors

Anne Heller – Brooklyn, NY & Santa Fe, NM; US Army Signal Corps, WWII (WAC)

Lloyd Hammel, Jr. – Oregon; US Army, WWII, PTO, Forward observer, Philippines & Korea

Raymond C. Hersey – Guelph, Can.; PPCLT Regiment, Canadian Special Force, Korea

John Krembs – Chicago, IL; US Army, Vietnam

Colin J. Meale – Whangarei, NZ; Service # 42/114919, WWII

James T. Robinson – Jupiter, FL; US Army WWII

Bernard G. Sykes – Norwood, MA, US Navy, Korea

John Wiltshier – Aukland, NZ – RNZAF, Squadron leader & RAF (Ret.)

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We Call Him Chesty

Chesty Puller

Chesty Puller

 

A strong name and a “man’s man” known by some and should be honored by all, is talked about by Mustang on his Fixed Bayonets site. Come join the rest of us in reading about Chesty Puller, USMC.

Fix Bayonets!

In my younger years, conventional parents and teachers encouraged boys and girls to read stories written about famous Americans.  I recall reading about William Penn, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Daniel Boone, Davy Crockett, Kit Carson, George Custer, Ulysses Grant, and Robert E. Lee.  They weren’t academically vetted manuscripts, of course —they were intended for elementary aged children, after all.  It is also true that some of these stories contained as much myth as fact, but it was the reading of these stories that gave children heroes —people who were, according to pre-communist educators, worthy of emulation.

VMI 1917I am not alone, apparently.  Another young man was exposed to these kinds of stories.  His name was Lewis Burwell Puller.  He was born in West Point, Virginia on 26 June 1898 —making him a little more than 8 years younger than my grandfather.  He grew up reading the same kinds of…

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