Blog Archives

Christmas Wishes for ALL

TO ALL THOSE WHO BELIEVE IN PEACE  HAVE A VERY MERRY CHRISTMAS !!!

REMEMBER THOSE WHO HELPED TO GIVE YOU FREEDOM!!!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

AND THOSE WHO CONTINUE TO KEEP US SAFE!!!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

 

AND

####################################################################################

Military Humor – 

 

####################################################################################

Farewell Salutes – 

Albert Atkins – Belvidere, NJ; US Army, Korea, Co. E/2nd/187th RCT, KIA

Mary (Sweet) Brown (103) – Tauranga, NZ; WA Air Force # 2031332, WWII

Ronald Burditt – NV; US Army, Korea, communications

Jack Downhill – Rochester, NY; US Army Air Corps, WWII, Korea, Vietnam, Lt.Col. (Ret. 28 y.)

Joseph Elliot – Los Angeles, CA; US Navy, WWII, Korea, Lt.Commander (Ret. 23 y.)

Richard Grimm – Athens, GA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 187/11th Airborne Division

Andrew McGarry (100) – Milton, OK; US Navy, WWII

Robert Newcomb (100) – Honolulu, HI; US Navy, WWII, PTO / Korea, Cmdr. (Ret. 20 y.)

Kenneth Reth – Racine, WI; US Army, WWII, ETO, tank battalion

Maurice Ritter – Cockeysville, MD; US Navy, WWII, USS Naukesa

Lones Wigger Jr. – Carter, MT; Vietnam, Lt.Colonel (Ret. 27 y.), Olympic Gold winner

#####################################################################################

 

 

Advertisements

CHRISTMAS

2a27c474be0791440a6d6ceff6a90ca3

TO ALL THOSE THAT BELIEVE IN FREEDOM AND PEACEMERRY CHRISTMAS, from THE PACIFIC PARATROOPER !!

christmas-military1

PLEASE REMEMBER THOSE THAT FOUGHT FOR US THEN….

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

AND THOSE THAT PROTECT US TODAY….

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

fba4011c5e41c58160e63bf26e72e910

chdiv25chdiv25

TO ALL MY FRIENDS AND NEW READERS – I WISH YOU ALL THE VERY BEST OF HOLIDAY SEASONS!!!

bqrgbo7c_zpsssmsu0go

***************************************************************************

MILITARY CHRISTMAS HUMOR – 

Humor from deployed Marines

Humor from deployed Marines

military_xmas__cecigian

Click on images to enlarge.

OOPS !!

OOPS !!

##################################################################

FAREWELL SALUTES – 

Loren Abdulla – Fox Lake, IL; USMC, WWII, PTO, Purple Heart (Yankton Sioux)

Robert Boyd – Auckland, NZ; RNZ Army # 136394, WWII, driveroperation-enduring-freedom-afgahanistan-wilderness-holiday-greetings1

Alfred Chew – Giddings, TX; US Army, Korea, demolition / US Air Force, TSgt. (Ret. 24 yrs.)

Steven Erceg – W.AUS; 3rd & 4th RAR, Vietnam

William Fields – Birmingham, AL; US Army, WWII, PTO

Daniel Martin – Portland, OR; US Army, WWII

Bruce R. Linzy – Gay, FL; US Army, Korea, Co. C/1st Batt./187th RCT

Toby Ortiz – Nambe, NM; US Army, WWII, PTO, 25th Infantry

Fred Persinger – Dover, TN; US Army Air Corps, WWII, (Ret. 28 years)

Ralph Wetmore – Lodi, CA; US Army, WWII, PTO, Sgt., medic

#####################################################################################

Personal Note – Please be patient, it’s been very busy around here and it may take me a while to get back to you.  I appreciate each and every one of you!!

militarychristmas

#####################################################################################

Electrical Section, 127 Wing, Christmas, 1943

From Pierre Lagacé, the gentleman who works tirelessly to bring our ancestors home to us!

RCAF No. 403 Squadron

Was your father, grandfather, uncle, granduncle, or someone you know was with Electrical Section, 127 Wing around Christmas time in 1943?

Well chances are that he is on this picture.

Electrician section

Lorne’s father is.

Electrician section Leonard Weston

This picture is probably not precious unless your father, grandfather, uncle, granduncle, or someone you know was with Electrical Section, 127 Wing around Christmas time in 1943.

If you find someone you know, please write a comment and I will get in touch.

View original post

A Korean War Christmas Story

Christmas 1950, Korea

Christmas 1950, Korea

“Home for Christmas” was the rallying cry as United Nations forces, spearheaded by American troops, were well on their way to clearing the entire Korean peninsula of Communist North Korean forces who had invaded South Korea in June, 1950. Then, in late November, in the dead of one of the coldest Korean winters on record, more than 300,000 troops from the Communist People’s Republic of China poured across the Yalu River and entered the war bent on the annihilation of U.N. forces and the installation of a Communist dictatorship for all of Korea. Within a few short days all hopes for a joyous Christmas were dashed. General Douglas MacArthur, the commander of all U.N. forces in Korea, said, “We face an entirely new war …”

Approximately 120,000 Chinese troops battered and besieged U.N. forces around the port city of Hungnam, in northeast Korea. When the U.N. command decided that the Hungnam area could not be held, a mass sea evacuation of troops, equipment and about 98,000 refugees began in mid-December.

At Taegu, South Korea, Norman Deptula, left, stands with two soldiers from the 581st Signal Radio Relay Company after they had been evacuated out of North Korea. COURTESY OF NORMAN DEPTULA

At Taegu, South Korea, Norman Deptula, left, stands with two soldiers from the 581st Signal Radio Relay Company after they had been evacuated out of North Korea.
COURTESY OF NORMAN DEPTULA

 

It was a bone-chilling, dark, dingy day, and amid the clamor, the confusion, and the dockside noises accompanying a forced evacuation, my company boarded a freighter and we began a cold, forbidding, four hundred-mile journey to South Korea’s southernmost port city of Pusan. Upon arriving in Pusan, we clambered aboard an unheated train, plunked ourselves and our gear onto hard wooden benches and tried, unsuccessfully, to cover the broken windows, through which howled icy blasts of air. Our train would take us north, to the town of Kyong-ju, a seventy mile trip.

When we finally arrived at our destination, we were a cold, tired, unkempt, dispirited group. Even though we recovered from our strep throats, our colds, and other assorted ills, the awful memories of the suffering, the violent deaths, the brutal unremitting cold, and the destruction which we had witnessed and endured left scars that would never heal.

The days flowed on, one into another, and soon Christmas would be upon us. “Home for Christmas” was a forlorn hope, but we still hoped to be able to observe, in some small way, the birth of the Prince of Peace, here, in the midst of war. Then, the tiniest of miracles occurred! Someone, possible an archangel disguised as a comrade in arms, said that the Catholic church in Kyong-ju would be holding a midnight Mass and transportation would be made available for anyone who wished to go. Our prayers were answered, and we would be privileged to help celebrate Christmas in a very special way.

Before boarding the trucks that would take us to the church on that Christmas eve, we exchanged holiday greetings with our comrades who had been assigned to guard duty patrolling the company perimeter. It was a clear, cold, starry night; someone began to quietly sing, “I’ll Be Home for Christmas.”

The exterior walls of the small church were pockmarked and some of the windows were broken. We noted with surprise that there were separate entrances, one for men and the other for women and children. The men of the parish entered through the door on the left and we followed them to the left side of the church where we sat on tiny wooden chairs. As the women entered through their entrance on our right, they covered their heads with white shawls, took off their shoes, which they placed in neat rows at the rear of the church, and picked up straw kneeling mats from a large pile that was stacked near the door. Infants were carried on the backs of their mothers, supported there by wide bands of cloth which were tied above their mothers’ waists.

While waiting for the Mass to begin, I glanced around and saw that the ceiling had many shallow cavities, each one marking a spot where a chunk of plaster had come loose and fallen. The church was unheated, but no one really noticed. An inner warmth radiated from the few candles on the altar and also from small, colorful silk banners which were suspended from the craggy ceiling. The banners, on which were written Korean figures, carried, we assumed, Christmas greetings. However, in deference to the American guests in the congregation, one banner proclaimed, in bright letters, “Mahry Xmas!” The spelling may not have been perfect, but the sentiments of those wonderful people was obvious and I, for one, would not have wanted it any other way.

1950 Christmas, Korea

1950 Christmas, Korea

A complete Nativity scene filled the area to the left of the altar, which was draped in silk and decorated with flowers and candles; a “real” Christmas tree, completely trimmed with tinsel, ornaments, and garland, stood on the other side of the altar. The sight of that beautiful tree set off a whole train of memories of another Christmas tree occupying, at that very moment, a place of honor in a warn, loving, caring home 10,000 miles away which was “Untouched by the evil that is war …”

Schoolchildren from the parish, ably and lovingly shepherded by Korean nuns, occupied tiny chairs at the very front of the church. The large, heavily starched, snow-white headpieces of the sisters stood in sharp contrast to our wrinkled, stained, and torn trousers and parkas, but such was the love and gratitude that was showered upon us that we did not, even for a moment, feel ill at ease.

At the rear center of the church stood an old, rickety, out-of-tune organ which was played by one of the Korean nuns. She accompanied a choir of schoolgirls who sang Christmas carols. Even though the choir occasionally sang off key, we knew what carols were being sung because we could, with some difficulty, recognize the music that was played and, while the choir sang in Korean, we sang with them, but in English. It was a riot of sounds, but to our ears it was positively joyous and — almost — heavenly.

Father Kim, the celebrant, said the Mass in Korean, but when it ended, he turned to face the congregation and, in halting English, extended, to the Americans in particular, his personal holiday greetings and then, in a final emotional gesture, he gave us his blessing. “The Mass is ended; go in Peace.”

Many Christmases have come and gone, but when the approach of winter heralds the beginning of another Christmas season, my thoughts and memories traverse the many years and the thousands of miles and I recall a very special Christmas in a tiny jewel of a church in Kyong-ju, Korea, and for one brief shining moment, the war is forgotten. I’ll never know what happened to Father Kim and his devoted flock, but I sincerely hope and pray that they have a truly Blessed Christmas.

Published 24 December 2015, by Norman Deptula in Star and Stripes magazine

########################################################################

Military Humor – 

6a00d8341bfadb53ef0120a4d8ae67970b-500wi

Always yield to a vehicle packing a Slammer!

Funny Military With Quotes Pics (48)

NOT always a good idea.

 

 

############################################################################

Farewell Salutes – 

Michael Beazley – Kalkohe, NZ; RNZ Army, Vietnam

Louis Bonacasa – Manorville, NY; US Air Force, Afghanistan, KIA

"Remembering Our Fallen", courtesy of: Cora Metz @ A Fresh Start

“Remembering Our Fallen”, courtesy of: Cora Metz @ A Fresh Start

Michael Cinco – Mercedes, TX; US Air Force; Afghanistan, SSgt., KIA

Dennis Condom – AUS; RAIF, Korea, POW

Willard Holmes – Dubois, ID; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, Co. C/187/11th Airborne

Scott Jamar – Sweetwater, TX; US Army, Iraq, Chief Warrant Officer, KIA

Joseph Lemm – W>Harrison, NY; US Air National Guard, Afghanistan, KIA

Meadow Lemon III – Wilmington, NC; US Army, (Harlem Globetrotter)

Chester McBride – Savannah, GA; US Air Force, Afghanistan, KIA

Peter Taub – Philadelphia, PA; US Air Force, Afghanistan, SSgt., KIA

Adrianna Vorderbruggen – Washington, D.C.; US Air Force, Major, KIA

################################################################################

Military Christmas, then and now

17-disney-wwii-uss-bunker-hill-christmas-card-donald

FOR ALL THOSE WHO BELIEVE IN FREEDOM AND PEACE, MERRY CHRISTMAS!!  

2a27c474be0791440a6d6ceff6a90ca3

PLEASE REMEMBER THOSE WHO FOUGHT FOR THOSE FREEDOMS…..

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

AND ALL THOSE WHO CONTINUE EACH DAY TO PROTECT US….

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

 

chdiv25chdiv25

TO ALL MY FRIENDS AND NEW READERS – I WISH YOU ALL THE VERY BEST OF HOLIDAY SEASONS!!!

bqrgbo7c_zpsssmsu0go

chdiv25chdiv25

Military Christmas Humor – 

christmas-soldiers-army-military-airforce-marines-deployed-overseas-holidays-photos-pictures-11.jpg HUMOR

military_xmas__cecigian

 

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Farewell Salutes – 

Carlton Appleby – Ontario, CA; USMC, Korea, Lt., 7th Marines

Glenn Berlin – Wichita, KS; US Navy, WWII

Mildred Drake – DeKalb, IL; US Navy WAVEe9dd0162494da2d1aba873c634610321

William Hushing – Palm Bch Gardens, FL; US Navy, WWII, RAdmiral (Ret.)

Kenneth Just – Louisville, KY; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 674th Artillery/11th Airborne

Walter Klock – St. Johnsonville, NY; US Navy, WWII, PTO, LST signalman

Alfred McElroy – Greenville, KY; US Army, Korea, 187th RCT (Ret. 21 years)

Ronald “Mugs” McKeown – San Diego, CA; US Navy, Capt. (Ret.), 1st Top Gun Commander

Earl Robertson – Spokane, WA; US Army, WWII, ETO

Ennis Warren – Mobile, AL; US Army Air Corps, WWII, ETO, B-17 Top-turret gunner

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

10396226-large

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

An Alaskan Christmas

Aleutian Christmas

Aleutian Christmas

CHIPLEY, Fla. (Tribune News Service) — A 10-inch blanket of snow covered Fort Richardson, Alaska, when Oscar “Buck” Buchanan first arrived in October 1942.

“To some of us Florida boys, this was an experience,” Buchanan wrote in an account detailing his service during World War II that he mailed to The News Herald. “The train was late [to pick us up] and we were told it was due to moose, who would use the tracks for walking through a tunnel made of snow and couldn’t get off the tracks.”

106th Engineers

106th Engineers

This is where Buchanan, a private in the National Guard, spent most of World War II with the Company D, Second Battalion, 106th Engineers.

Two years earlier, Buchanan, then 22, left West Bay with his friend Alex Hinote to enlist.

“At that time, I either had to volunteer into the service or be drafted,” he said.

After a brief honeymoon with his new wife, Juanita Sasnett, he started moving around the country, first for his own training, then to train others.

When the bombs fell on Pearl Harbor, everything changed, he said. The unit was told to prepare to ship overseas for combat, their time extended for the length of the war, and they were promoted to general engineers.

Troops on Attu

Troops on Attu

“Our trucks, with a lot of equipment, were loaded onto a train and preceded us to Fort Dix, and sent directly to England. We followed later on Pullman cars — our first train ride — and were scheduled to follow our equipment to England on the Queen Mary,” Buchanan wrote. “While waiting for the boat, another decision was made for us to be sent to Alaska.”

The Japanese had occupied the Aleutian Islands, which fan out toward Asia from the southwestern tip of Alaska, and the U.S. government was worried about the possibility of a mainland invasion from the north.

So Buchanan was sent in the opposite direction of his things.

Along the way, he stopped with a few friends in Olympia, Wash., for 72 hours.

“We visited a ‘service center’ and were entertained by some of the staff. We asked the lady at the piano if she could play ‘Dixie.’ She could and we sang ‘Dixie Land, where I was born’ along with her,” Buchanan, now 95, wrote.

Later in the evening, they tried local oysters, confusing the waitress by asking for them raw instead of in stew.

“When the oysters came, they were the size of a quarter and in a bowl. They tasted like chalk. She said they came from China,” he recalled. “We took the stew.”

Muir Glacier, 1940's

Muir Glacier, 1940’s

The dining reportedly did not improve as Buchanan traveled by a freight boat through the Inside Passage to Alaska.

When they arrived north, the men were outfitted with winter clothes, a coal heater and an A-frame tent. It was an adjustment for those who were used to warmer climates.

“Sometimes the food froze on the plates before it could be eaten,” Buchanan said. “On Christmas Day 1942, the temperature was 43 degrees below freezing.”

At the start of the New Year, the men were moved farther north to an Alaskan base with Quonset huts, where the military had to build an airport capable of accommodating a B-24 bomber as well as a hospital, a railroad and roads. As part of the construction, they had to tunnel through a mountain to get to the harbor.

The men were aided by civilians, and Buchanan became a trained surveyor.

106engbat1 (428x320)

As it seemed less likely the Japanese would enter Alaska, the work slowed and the American men began to relax. They skied makeshift slopes, visited Mount McKinley, received furloughs back to the States, visited Anchorage, hunted and fished.

When the war ended, the men went home to “no fanfare,” Buchanan wrote. He returned to his wife in Chipley, continued to work as a surveyor, and raised two children. He still lives in Chipley.

To this day, he said on the phone, he feels the 106th Engineer Battalion should have received a little more credit.

“We were called to a defense duty in Alaska and did it well. Even though there were no fatalities in the unit, no credit was given to them for the casualties — civilians as well as soldiers — that were prevented by preparing the Alaskan front for the invasion of the Japanese forces,” he said. “When the Japanese got ‘cold feet’ and fled to a warmer climate, the Florida boys got cold feet but stood their ground.”

©2015 The News Herald (Panama City, Fla.)
Visit The News Herald (Panama City, Fla.) at http://www.newsherald.com
Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Click on images to enlarge.

#############################################################################

Military Humor – 

Sometimes you just have to keep you equipment on a leash.

Sometimes you just have to keep you equipment on a leash.

Engineer's priority....

Engineer’s priority….

 

###############################################################################

Farewell Salutes – 

James Beavers – Marion, IN; US Army, Vietnam

Vincent Capodanno – Staten Island, NY; USMC, Vietnam, Chaplain, Medal of Honor, KIA

Milton Crenshaw – Little Rock, AR; US Army Air Corps, WWII, Tuskegee instructor0083f165f66161f63454e92890403bcd

Henry ‘Red’ Erwin – Adamsville, AL; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, Sgt., B-29 radioman, POW, Medal of Honor

Kenneth Howarth – Chester, NY; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 127th Engineers/11th Airborne

Yvonne Mole – Victor Harbor, AUS; A Army Medical Womans Service # SFX 24647, WWII

Paul Oskolkoff – Ninilchik, AK; US Navy, Vietnam

Frederick Scott – Gainsville, FL; US Army Air Corps, WWII, B-17 mechanic

Harry Shipman – Hamilton, CAN; RC Army, WWII, ETO, 48th Highlanders

Dwayne ‘Doc’ Wise – Storm Lake, IA; USMC, WWII, Korea, Lt. (Ret. 22 years)

##################################################################################

Christmas ala 1942

pine_campH   PACIFIC PARATROOPER WISHES ALL FRIENDS AND VISITORS A VERY MERRY CHRISTMAS!!!

On The Home Front

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 Those That Gave Us A Home Front

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

A VERY SPECIAL CALL TO THE MILITARY – BOTH PAST AND PRESENT – THANK YOU – HAPPY HOLIDAYS and PEACE IN YOUR LIFETIME!!!

soldiersx-mas

TO THOSE WHO DO NOT CELEBRATE THIS HOLIDAY – I WISH YOU THE WARMTH AND CONTENTMENT THAT IS REPRESENTED BY THIS SEASON!!! winter-scene-72 AND – I CAN NOT PASS UP A SPECIAL SHOUT OUT TO THE VETERANS AND VOLUNTEERS of the LITTLE ROCK VA!!! fz6fzb Click on images to enlarge. ################################################################################# Military Christmas Humor –  a0e05cd072aa4845c54ae8a05d9a27f1

Need a lift?

Need a lift?

image019 ################################################################################# Farewell Salutes – border Allen Bainard – Qualicum Beah, CAN; Canadian Army, WWII, ETO, artillery signalman

Stanley Foster – Auckland, NZ; RNZ Air Force # 43612, WWII, 6th Flying Boat Sq.

John Goodwin – Shreveport, LA; USMC (Ret. 22yrs), Korea, Vietnam, cryptoanalyst

William Lemnitzer – Arlington, VA; US Army, BGeneral (Ret.), Korea, Vietnam, Bronze Star, West Point Class ’51

Norman Nary – Northwood, NH; US Navy, WWII

Loren Padgett – Boise, ID; US Army, WWII

Elwyn Sievers – Mayflower, AR; US Army, Korea, Vietnam, Warrant Officer

Alphonse Toczko – New Britain, CT; USMC, WWII

Michael Wardinski – Springfield, VA; US Army, Colonel (Ret. 33 yrs), Korea, Vietnam border ##################################################################################

1950’s Christmas

Rockwell's Christmas

Rockwell’s Christmas

 

TO ALL –

NO MATTER WHAT RELIGION YOU HOLD DEAR, THE VERY BEST WISHES OF THIS HOLIDAY SEASON GO OUT TO EACH AND EVERY ONE OF YOU.  AND, I RAISE A TOAST THAT WE ENJOY A CONTINUED FRIENDSHIP THROUGHOUT THE COMING YEAR.

il_570xN.311804514

 

 

finish that last-minute shopping; Chicago 1950

finish that last-minute shopping; Chicago 1950

Sing the carols

Sing the carols

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Smitty made this set-up full size and it sat on our front lawn my entire childhood

Smitty made this set-up life- size and it sat on our front lawn my entire childhood

 

 

 

memories of the ole' days

memories of the ole’ days

 

 

#########################################################################################

 TO THE MILITARY OF EVERY PEACEFUL NATION, THANK YOU!   MAY YOU RECEIVE A MAGICAL CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR!

 

SC386864

 

A Soldiers Night Before Christmas 

Twas the night before Christmas, he lived all alone,
In a one bedroom house made of plaster and stone.
I had come down the chimney with presents to give,
And to see just who in this house did live.
 
I looked all about, a strange sight I did see,
No tinsel, no presents, not even a tree.
No stockings by the fire, just boots filled with sand,
On the wall hung pictures of far distant lands.
 
With medals and badges, awards of all kind,
A sober thought came through my mind.
For this house was different, so dark, so dreary,
I knew I had found the home of a soldier, once I saw clearly.
 
I heard stories about them, I had to see more,
So I walked down the hall and pushed open the door.
And there he lay sleeping silent alone,
Curled up on the floor in his one bedroom home.
 
His face so gentle, his room in disorder,
Not how I pictured a United States soldier.
Was this the hero of whom I’d just read?
Curled up in his poncho, a floor for his bed?
 
His head was clean shaven, his weathered face tan,
I soon understood this was more than a man.
For I realized the families that I saw that night,
Owed their lives to these men who were willing to fight.
 
 
1950 Australian notice

1950 Australian notice

 

Soon ’round the world, the children would play,
And grownups would celebrate on a bright Christmas day.
They all enjoyed freedom each month of the year,
Because of soldiers like this one lying here.
 
I couldn’t help wonder how many lay alone,
On a cold Christmas Eve in a land far from home.
Just the very thought brought a tear to my eye,
I dropped to my knees and started to cry.
 
The soldier awakened and I heard a rough voice,
“Santa don’t cry, this life is my choice;
I fight for freedom, I don’t ask for more,
My life is my God, my country, my Corps.
 
With that he rolled over and drifted back into sleep,
I couldn’t control it, I continued to weep.
I watched him for hours, so silent and still,
I noticed he shivered from the cold night’s chill.
 
So I took off my jacket, the one made of red,
And I covered this Soldier from his toes to his head.
And I put on his T-shirt of gray and black,
With an eagle and an Army patch embroidered on back.
 
And although it barely fit me, I began to swell with pride,
And for a shining moment, I was U.S. Army deep inside.
I didn’t want to leave him on that cold, dark night,
This guardian of honor so willing to fight.
 
Then the soldier rolled over, whispered with a voice clean and pure,
“Carry on Santa, it’s Christmas Day, all is secure.”
One look at my watch and I knew he was right,
Merry Christmas, my friend, and to all a good night!
 
a soldier's Christmas tree

a soldier’s Christmas tree

making a cake in an ammo can

making a cake in an ammo can

######################################################################

Farewell Salutes –

William Archibald – Park Ridge, IL; US Navy, WWIIVeterans_Day-thanks

Robert Baker – Fairfax, VA; US Air Force, Colonel

Dominick Busceti – Uniondale, NY; US Army, Korea

Frederick King – Washington D.C.; US Air Force, Colonel (Retired)

Billy Laurie – Redding, CA; US Navy, SeeBees

Hector Pina – Chicago, IL; US Army, WWII, 42nd Rainbow Division

David Regner – Chicago, IL; US Army, Korea

Louis Unti – Burr Ridge, IL; US Navy, WWII PTO, USS LST 596

John Wilkin – Paris, Ontario, Canada; RCOC & RCEME,  WWII

##############################################################################

PERSONAL NOTE –

I usually post on the holiday’s actual date, but wanted to send this out around the world so that I might reach everyone in EVERY time zone.  My warmest wishes and heartiest thank you’s go along with it.

##############################################################################

Christmas in 1940’s style

Christmas wishes from the '40's and pacificparatrooper

Christmas wishes from the ’40’s and pacificparatrooper

"new movie - just out"

“new movie – just out”

 A wish from all us

A wish from all us

Chesterfield ad with Ronald Reagan

Chesterfield ad with Ronald Reagan

The ole home-cooked dinner

The ole home-cooked dinner

'40's Christmas card

’40’s Christmas card

They even had a pin-up girl

They even had a pin-up girl

Star and Stripes Forever

Star and Stripes Forever

thumbnail2
A patriotic 1940's wish

A patriotic 1940’s wish

A very Merry Christmas to all in WWII era style. My best wishes and thanks to those of you who happen to pass this way.

To the Military: My prayers and thanks go to you for your service and we all hope to see you soon.

To those who do not celebrate this holiday: I wish you the good blessing and heartfelt emotions that are symbolized in the season.

%d bloggers like this: