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Intermission (10) – Buddies in war

GI Jenny, the burro mascot of the Army in North Africa, with Cpl. William Wende & Pito, 1943

GI Jenny, the burro mascot of the Army in North Africa, with Cpl. William Wende & Pito, 1943

We couldn’t allow the Intermission period to pass without a post about the animals.  Many have already seen my post about Marine Dog Lucca and the 9/11 work dogs, so here is another……

When waging war against each other, human armies often enlist the aid of the animal kingdom. In past conflicts, horses, elephants, and camels hauled men and supplies; pigeons carried messages; dogs tracked enemies and protected troops. Their efforts helped to turn battles—and the fortunes of many a combat soldier.

Tim - was the mascot of the Australian Army 2/2nd Battalion

Tim – was the mascot of the Australian Army 2/2nd Battalion

Carrying on this tradition, U.S. forces employed thousands of animals during World War II. They could be found in every theater of the war: They were workers and warriors; they were soldiers’ comrades-in-arms and companions in battle. Their widespread presence on the battlefields was documented by government photographers covering the war.

Horses, mules, and dogs were regularly employed by American forces to work on the battlefields of World War II. Horses carried soldiers on patrol missions in Europe and into battle in the Philippines. Mules, trained in the United States and shipped by the thousands into war zones, contributed their strength and sweat to the fight. Their backs bore the food, weapons, and sometimes the men of entire infantry units.

Pvt. Hunt the parakeet was a mascot in the Solomon Islands, here w/ Pvt. Currie

Pvt. Hunt the parakeet was a mascot in the Solomon Islands, here w/ Pvt. Currie

Some twenty thousand dogs served the U.S. Army, Coast Guard, and Marine Corps. They guarded posts and supplies, carried messages, and rescued downed pilots. Scout dogs led troops through enemy territory, exposing ambushes and saving the lives of platoons of men. In the throes of combat, war dogs proved their intelligence, courage, and steadfast loyalty time and time again. Many photographs in National Archives holdings document the exploits—and the sacrifice—of America’s animal warriors.

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Information was condensed from the U.S. National Archives, also most of the photos, others from Waronline and AOL Images.

Click on images to enlarge.   Some are not available larger.

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Military Dog Humor –

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Farewell Salutes – 

Merlin Bishop – Delta, UT; US Navy, WWII, pilot

Robert Casey – Terre Haute, IN; US Army, WWII, ETO, 3rd Army

Charles Dixon – Augusta, GA; US Army, WWII, CBI + Africa, Majorhalfstaffflag

Cliff Hall – WY & CO; US Navy, WWII

James Lindly – Lubbock, TX; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 188/11th Airborne

Alan Mason – Feilding, NZ; RNZ Navy # 6075, WWII

Herbert Nesbitt Sr. – Ontario, CAN; RC Air Force, WWII, ETO, Sgt., pilot

Edward Richards – Victoria, AUS; RA Army # 3156502, Vietnam, 4th Battalion

Biagio Tedesco – brn: St. Agata, ITA/Milwaukee, WI; US Army, WWII, PTO

John Wagner – Broad Channel, NY; US Navy, WWII

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National Dog Day(s)

OUR MILITARY WORKING DOGS

'Scoop' - Stars & Stripes mascot in Korea Sept. 1950

‘Scoop’ – Stars & Stripes mascot in Korea Sept. 1950

Whether battle-trained or just loyal, man’s best friend has been photographed following troops into battle since the Civil War. And just like the changes in tactics through the years, the relationship between servicemembers and canine companions has evolved through training, on the battlefield, and how they’re used back home.

With wagging tales and slobbering kisses, dogs now help assimilate servicemembers to life away after returning home — something Stars and Stripes has documented several times in the twilight of the United States’ most recent conflicts.

Smedley Butler - USMC, San Diego facing his Drill Sgt.

Smedley Butler – USMC, San Diego facing his Drill Sgt.

In celebration of National Dog Day, here’s a look back at the dogs that have greeted, helped and stayed by their best friends during the most trying times.

 tibbetts.meredith@stripes.com
For a video about working dog, trained by veterans – for veterans______
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Military Dog Humor – eb41315790d1b4cd9f364661285535e5

dog-humor

 

 

DvilDog1

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Farewell Salutes – 

Albert Boverio – San Jose, CA; US Army, WWII, ETO, 95th Field Artillery Battalion

Chester Carter – NY & NC; US Army, WWII, ETOBaby on tombstone.jpg Those left behind.

Milton Frederick – W> AUS; RA Army, WWII

Desmond Knauf – Rotorua, NZ; RNZ Navy #NZ3354, WWII

Henry Lee – Wichita, KS; US Army Air Corps, WWII

Frank Peterson Jr. – Stevensville, MD; USMC, Korea & Vietnam [1st Black Marine pilot]

Matthew Roland – Lexington, KY; US Air Force, Afghanistan, 21/23 Special Tactics Squadron, Captain

Forest Sibley – Pensacola, FL; US Air Force, Afghanistan, Special Operations, SSgt.

William Owen Young – Burma & CAN; Royal Bombay Sappers & Miners, WWII, 411 Parachute Squadron

Frank Zimmerman Jr. – Gresham, OR; US Army, WWII, PTO, Bronze Star, Purple Heart

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Meet Naoto Matsumura, The Guardian of Fukushima’s Animals

With all the renewed discussions about the A-bomb and radiation, I chose to spotlight this man _____

Kindness Blog

Naoto Matsumura is the only human who now lives in Fukushima’s 12.5-mile radiation exclusion zone in Japan.

Naoto Matsumura, Guardian of Fukushima’s Animals

At first he fled the radation-riddle area, but he returned soon after to feed his animals.

Naoto Matsumura, Guardian of Fukushima’s AnimalsNaoto Matsumura, Guardian of Fukushima’s Animals

Matsumura then realized that there were thousands of other creatures that needed to be fed, as well. The 55-year-old says he knows the radiation levels are dangerous but refuses to worry about it.

Naoto Matsumura, Guardian of Fukushima’s AnimalsNaoto Matsumura, Guardian of Fukushima’s AnimalsNaoto Matsumura, Guardian of Fukushima’s AnimalsNaoto Matsumura, Guardian of Fukushima’s Animals

“They told me that I wouldn’t get sick for 30 years. I’ll most likely be dead by then anyway, so I couldn’t care less,” he said.

When he first returned, he saw that thousands of cows had died after being locked up in barns. He freed the creatures that had been left tied up by their owners and takes care of all of them.

Naoto Matsumura, Guardian of Fukushima’s AnimalsNaoto Matsumura, Guardian of Fukushima’s AnimalsNaoto Matsumura, Guardian of Fukushima’s AnimalsNaoto Matsumura, Guardian of Fukushima’s Animals

Today, most of the creatures rely on him for food, and he works entirely on the support of donations and…

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