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242nd USMC Birthday Message – 2017

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10 November 2017 is the 242nd birthday of the United States Marine Corps, please listen to the message delivered from Guadalcanal by General Robert Neller, Commandant of the USMC and Sgt.Major Ronald Green as they address all Marines and Sailors around the world….

Click on images to enlarge.

 

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Marine Humor – 

 

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Thomas Barclay – Duxbury, MA; USMC, Korea, 1st Marine Division, Silver Star

Robert Palmer Coles Jr. – Bronx, NY; US Navy, WWII, PTO, Chief Petty Off. radioman (Ret. 30 y.)

James Conard – Lexington, SC; USMC, Vietnam, Major (Ret. 20 y.), Purple Heart

Ray Fenstemaker – Whitehall, OH; USMC, WWII & Korea

Orlis Kennicutt – Orange Park, FL, USMC, Captain (Ret.)

Nicholas Newell – Oceanside, CA; USMC, Sgt.

James Reynolds – Savannah, GA; USMC, SSgt. (Ret.)

Eric Thomas – Portland, ME; USMC & US Coast Guard

Carroll Vorgang – Jeffersonville, IN; USMC, Korea & Vietnam, Colonel (Ret. 29 y.)

Hank Williams – Princeton, WV; USMC, GySgt. (Ret.)

Kenneth Young – Tucker, AR; USMC, WWII, PTO, Purple Heart

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Current look back at the home front

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My Years of Eating Dangerously

by: William Jeanes, former editor-in-chief of ‘Car and Driver’

Marie Osmond told me on tv that she lost 50 lbs. eating prepackaged meals sent to her home, and not too long ago, the nation’s first lady ran off the White House pastry chef.  That reminded me of childhood mealtimes and my grandmother’s nutritional malfeasance.

Until well after WWII ended, I lived on 6th Street in Corinth, MS, with my grandparents.  Two aunts also lived with us.  All the men were in the Pacific, leaving my grandfather (Pop), to provide.  My grandmother (Mom), ran the house.

Pop was a superb provider.  He worked as a carpenter for the TVA and had a green B sticker on his car’s windshield, meaning that we had income and gasoline.  He also had a green thumb and grew green vegetables in a huge backyard garden.  Pop also fished, and he put fresh bream and crappie on our big dining room table at least twice a week.  He also oversaw a backyard chicken house that delivered eggs as well as raw material for the big, black frying pan that dominated Mom’s cooking.

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Mom was a canner and preserver.  We had – in what seemed to be endless quantity – green beans, pickled beets, peaches, strawberry preserves, and goodness knows what else.

Mom supplemented this bounty by going to the tiny Kroger store once a week for meat, which was rationed, and such staples as Luzianne coffee, Domino sugar, Clabber Girl baking powder and Crisco shortening.

Many things were served fried: chicken, green tomatoes, fish and pork chops.  Steak, scarce in wartime, was “chicken-fried.”  Meatloaf was baked of course, as was macaroni and cheese.

Mom always overcooked the steak and pork chops.  In those times, the idea of a rare steak or hamburger could disgust whole neighborhoods.  A typical summer meal included fried fish, tomatoes, green beans or butter beans and turnip greens or collards.  I hated greens more than I hated Tojo or Hitler.  If we had salad, it was a wedge of iceberg lettuces doused with French dressing, an orangey liquid unknown in France.

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Modern nutritionists would hyperventilate just thinking about what we ate in the 1940’s.  On the healthy side were the vegetables and greens that were available 6 months out of the year.  From there, things went nutritionally sideways.  Nowadays my grandparents would be guilty of child abuse.

Can you imagine a germ-laden hen house in a backyard of today?  How about wringing the neck of a chicken on the back steps?  Those activities would have brought the SWAT teams from PETA and the EPA pouring through our front door.

The Dept. of Agriculture never inspected Pop’s garden, let alone the hen house, and Mom adhered to no federal guidelines when it came to canning and cooking and cake making.  As fore fried food, the only questions were, “Is it crisp enough?” and “May I have some more?”

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Out house was heated by coal, we drank non-homogenized milk and we rarely locked doors.  It’s a wonder I wasn’t overcome by fumes, poisoned or stolen by gypsies.  Yet we survived.  Pop lived to be 88 and Mom 82.  Both aunts made it well past 80 and I was 77 on my last birthday. [This was originally published in Sept/Oct. 2015].

That’s what 400 year’s worth of fried chicken and beet pickles can do for you.

Condensed from the Saturday Evening Post.

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 Military Humor – on their food – 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Robert Arthur – Louisville, KY; USMC, WWII, PTO

Charlton ‘Chuck’ Cox – Seattle, WA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, B-17 navigator/Korea06062012_AP120606024194-600

Edward Fuge – Otaki, NZ; RNZ Navy, WWII

Delva Gess – Chewelah, ID; USO, WWII

Roy Hart – Saskatchewan, CAN; RC Air Force, WWII, CBI & ETO

Cecil Jarmer – Portland, OR; US Navy, WWII, CBI

George Macneilage – San Bernadino, CA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 11th Airborne Div., artillery

Nita Rinehart – Ashtabula, OH; US Navy, WWII WAVES, WWII

Ernest Sprouse Jr. – Knoxville, TN; US Navy, WWII, USS Frost

Gene Wilder, Milwaukee, WI; US Army, (beloved actor)

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For D-Day, Two survivors sing a WWII foxhole song …

Bill and Babe

Bill and Babe

Two of the real life Band of Brothers, best friends Wild Bill Guarnere and Babe Heffron, sing “Mares Eat Oats.”  {My own mother sang this so often, it was impossible NOT to learn the song!]

William J. Guarnere (April 28th 1923 – March 8th 2014) and Edward James “Babe” Heffron (May 16th 1923 – December 1st 2013) were United States Army soldiers who fought in World War II with Easy Company, 2nd Battalion, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, in the U.S. Army’s 101st Airborne Division.

Easy Company, D-Day

Easy Company, D-Day

Guarnere was portrayed in the 2001 HBO miniseries Band of Brothers by Frank John Hughes, and Heffron was portrayed by Robin Laing.

“Mairzy Doats” is a novelty song composed in 1943, by Milton Drake, Al Hoffman and Jerry Livingston. It was first played on radio station WOR, New York, by Al Trace and his Silly Symphonists. The song made the pop charts several times, with a version by the Merry Macs reaching No. 1 in March 1944. The song was also a number one sheet music seller, with sales of over 450,000 within the first three weeks of release.

Easy Company's route.

Easy Company’s route.

The song’s refrain, as written on the sheet music, seems meaningless:

“Mairzy doats and dozy doats and liddle lamzy divey
A kiddley divey too, wooden shoe!”

However, the lyrics of the bridge provide a clue:

“If the words sound queer and funny to your ear, a little bit jumbled and jivey,
Sing ‘Mares eat oats and does eat oats and little lambs eat ivy’”.

This hint allows the ear to translate the final line as “[a] kid’ll eat ivy, too, wouldn’t you?”

CLICK ON IMAGES TO ENLARGE.

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Other D-Day posts of Pacific Paratrooper:

https://pacificparatrooper.wordpress.com/2015/06/06/d-day/

https://pacificparatrooper.wordpress.com/2013/06/06/june-6-d-day-in-art-2/

First Hand Accounts of ‘The Longest Day’ 

https://pacificparatrooper.wordpress.com/2014/06/09/intermission-stories-20/

https://pacificparatrooper.wordpress.com/2014/06/11/intermission-stories-21/

https://pacificparatrooper.wordpress.com/2014/06/11/intermission-stories-21/

https://pacificparatrooper.wordpress.com/2014/06/18/intermission-stories-23/

https://pacificparatrooper.wordpress.com/2014/06/23/intermission-stories-24/

https://pacificparatrooper.wordpress.com/2014/06/25/intermission-stories-25/

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Military Humor –

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Farewell Salutes –

Christine Armstrong – Twentynine Palms, CA; US Army, 1st Cavalry Div., Spec., Texas flood

Brandon Banner – Milton, FL; US Army, 1st Cavalry, Pfc., Texas floodMemorial Day Image

Howard Brisbane – New Orleans, LA; USMC, WWII, PTO, Pharmacist’s mate, 8th Marines, KIA (Tarawa)

Joseph Stanley Cikan – Brookfield, IL; US Air Force, MSgt.

Miguel Colonvasquez – Brooklyn, NY; US Army, Iraq, Afghanistan, 1st Cavalry, SSgt. Texas flood

Isaac Deleon – San Angelo, TX; US Army, 1st Cavalry, Pvt., Texas flood

Zachery Fuller – Palmetto, FL; US Army, 1st Cavalry, Pfc., Texas flood

Eddy Gates – Dunn, NC; US Army, 1st Cavalry, Pvt., Texas flood

Tysheena James – Jersey City, NJ; US Army, 1st Cavalry, Pvt., Texas flood

Jeff Kuss – Durango, CO; USMC, Afghanistan, Blue Angels, Captain, pilot

Mary Elizabeth Palmer – Little Rock, AK; US Navy WAVE, WWII

Mitchel Winey – Valparaiso, IN; US Army West Point Cadet, 1st Regiment, Texas flood

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June 1943 (2)

The jungle of New Georgia

The jungle of New Georgia

On New Georgia there were no trails or roads.  When a passage was cut, a company-size unit of men would turn the footing into a sea of mud.  The only large, flat area was a former copra plantation around the Munda airfield.  Charts were another problem.  They were pre-WWII and some dated back to the German Admiralty of the 1890’s.

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21-30 June – Operation Toenails began with air and naval bombardments on Japanese land positions.  The waters were mined to prevent the enemy from bringing in reinforcements.  Col. Michael Currin’s Raiders of the 4th Marines landed first and then were relieved by 2 other infantry companies.  Sergi Point was taken and they began heading toward Viru Harbor, going through the thick Kunai grass filled with enemy snipers.  Sgt. Anthony Coulis, of P Company, remembered hacking at the grass for 12 exhausting hours to go 7 miles, “How I lived through that day, I’ll never know.”

Viru Harbor

Viru Harbor

More US troops landed at Viru and pushed the enemy back from their defensive positions.  As they headed into the jungle, they moved going in the exact direction of the Raiders.  By the 30th, the US 43rd Division took the island of Rendova, within artillery range of New Georgia, making it a valuable step on the drive to Bougainville.

Minorou (Noboru) Sasaki

Minorou (Noboru) Sasaki

The US Naval site said this campaign was needlessly complex and often led by Army officers who had little or no knowledge of the terrain and whose troops were woefully inexperienced and physically unprepared.  These Americans also had the misfortune of facing one of the most wily and resolute Japanese generals of the CBI and Pacific War, Minorou Sasaki.

23-30 June – the Troubriand Islands off the Papuan Peninsula of New Guinea were invaded by the 41st Division at Nassau Bay unopposed.  A battalion of the US 32nd Division landed 20 miles (32 km) south of the Japanese positions at Salamaua.  These troops were to meet up with the Australian 3rd Division, who were still holding the airfield at Wau.  General Imamura had fallen for MacArthur’s ploy and split his defenses at Lae by sending troops south to hold Salamaua.  This would lead to his ultimate defeat.

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30 June – was the D-Day for Operation Chronicle.  The Woodlark Force – units of the 112th Cavalry, the 134th Field Artillery Battalion and the 12th Marine Defense Battalion – 2,600 troops, landed at 2100 hours and began unloading the LST’s.  Nearly simultaneously, 2,250 of the Kiriwina Force were landing.  Unfortunately, the water was extremely shallow and the LCT’s became grounded about 200-300 yards from the beach.  This made unloading extremely difficult and slow.

Click on images to enlarge.

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Military Humor – nws450402wingert

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Alexander Barker – Rye, NY; US Army Air Corps, WWII, ETO, Major

Creighton Chestnut – NZ; NZ Army # 206368, Korea, Cpl.BFC at sunset (800x543)

Wayne Hubener – Ashland, MA; US Army, Korea, 187th RCT

Kenneth Jones – New Smyrna Beach, FL; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 152nd Artillery

Frank Magaro – Dillsburg, IL; USMC, Korea, Echo Company

Maurice Moore – Nova Scotia, CAN; RC Navy

Dwaine Nickeson – Hartford, CT; US Army Korea, Vietnam, Major

Jamie Pettigrew – AR; US Navy WAVE, WWII

Paul Taylor – Huntsville, AL; US Army Air Corps, WWII, ETO, B-17 navigator

John Woollems – Wichita, KS; US Army Air Corps, WWII

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First Hand Account

 

Robert Larson

Robert Larson

 

Ensign Robert Larson, PBY Co-pilot and Navigator, from Monticello, Iowa – on the Aleutian War.

Dutch Harbor, 1942

Dutch Harbor, 1942

“When the Japanese came ashore at Attu and Kiska on 6 June, the original intent was never to hold the islands.  The operation was to be a side show to divert the US Navy and draw them into a final destructive battle at Midway.  Admiral Yamamoto had hoped that with the bulk of their fleet destroyed, the Americans would accept some sort of peace settlement that would let Japan consolidate her gains.

Japanese troops on Kiska

Japanese troops on Kiska

“After the landings on Attu and Kiska the only aircraft capable of reaching the islands from the US bases were the Navy PBY’s and the B-17s and B-24s of the Army Air Corps.  Commander Leslie E. Gehres was a 4-stripe regular Navy captain in command of Patrol Wing 4.

US Army in Alaska, 1942

US Army in Alaska, 1942

“The Army attempted to bomb the Japanese forces but with little success with the small amount of aircraft at their disposal.  Capt. Gehres notified CINCPAC of the landings and informed them that he had a seaplane tender at Nazan Bay, Atka Island, halfway to Kiska with 20+ PBY’s.  The USS Gillis was the tender.

USS Gillis

USS Gillis

“The captain had his hands full servicing many more aircraft with bombs and fuel than his ship was designed or supplied to support.  The crews took over part of an Aleut fishing village and were fed by a school teacher from her small kitchen with the help of some of the willing Aleut natives.  Off the bay, one of the PBY’s bombed a Japanese submarine near Tanga Island that had been on life guard duty for the enemy pilots.

William Thies, pilot

William Thies, pilot

“The PBY’s opened the campaign on 11 June, following up a bombing run by B-24s of the 11th Air Force.  The PBY’s came down through the overcast dive bomber fashion and the Japanese soon got the range with their 20-mm antiaircraft cannon and 13.2-mm heavy machine-guns.

“The air combat went on for 3 days and at the end, the exhausted crews suffered multiple dead and wounded.  The entire supply of pencils and rags of the Aleut village were used for patching holes in the aircraft as the planes continued a non-stop shuttle back and forth to Kiska.  The PBY was a dependable but slow lumbering aircraft (175 mph), not suited to sudden stressful evasive maneuvers.  Often they came back to the Gillis so riddled by AA fire that they almost sank.

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Engineers in action.

 

“The Japanese, now wise to the American tactics, brought out more heavy antiaircraft guns, pointed their AA batteries at holes in the low overcast and waited for the PBY’s to emerge.  Finally, with ammunition and fuel almost exhausted and men pushed to the brink of their endurance, the Gillis withdrew from Nazan Bay, urged on by the arrival of Japanese float recon planes from Kiska.

Koga's gravesite

Koga’s gravesite

“Japanese Commander Mukai later stated that the PBY’s interfered considerably with their efforts to develop Kiska into a support base.  Their attacks forced them to withdraw their ships from Kiska Harbor.  The Japanese had brought in their Mavis 4-engine recon planes, but the attacks had kept their supplies out their reach.  Bill, [William Thies, pilot], flew one other support mission at this time.  He returned to Kanga to pick up a weather team of 5 men, who after burning the station, climbed aboard.  When the Mavis’s got operational, they flew over the Aleut village at Atka, and even though it was burned out, they dropped their bombs anyway.  Bill and his crew would soon return to Nazan Bay [within a few weeks] with both the Gillis and Casco and find the fighting worse.  They would fly every day for 33 days.”

Robert Larson would later make Commander while in the reserves and he spent 33 years as Chief of Technical Staff of Boeing.  Cmdr. Larson passed away 21 December 2007.

Click on images to enlarge.

Judy Hardy had 2 relatives in Alaska during the war – try her site for the home front view…HERE!

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The future of the Navy is now…

USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) expected to be commissioned later 2015

USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) expected to be commissioned later 2015

Captain James Kirk

Captain James Kirk

 

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Cold Humor – still….

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Farewell Salutes – 

Dean Allgood – Rigby, ID; USMC, WWII, PTO, Purple Heart

Brian Black – Henderson, NZ; RNZ Air Force # 429953, WWII

Raymond Delsart – Sturgeon Bay, WI; US Army, WWII

Aleutians, 1943

Aleutians, 1943

Alexander Dyce – Toronto, CAN; RC Air Force, WWII, 413th Squadron

Horace Finch – Griffin, GA; US Army, WWII, PTO

Kurt Landsburger – born: Prague, NJ & FL; US Army, WWII, ETO, translator

John Moingo – Marion, IL; US Navy, Korea, Vietnam, Captain (Ret. 30 years)

Ralph Nittolo – Jupiter, FL; US Navy (19 mos), US Air Force (Ret. 20 years), Korea & Vietnam, tech Sgt.

Joseph Pezzulo – Queensbury, NY; US Air Force, Korea

Anthony Tedeschi Sr. – Endicott, NY; US Army, WWII, ETO

John Wilders, JR. – Merrimack, NH; US Navy, Vietnam, radio operator

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April 1942 (3)

Equipment set ablaze before retreating from the Japanese, Tenangyaung, 16 April 1942

Equipment set ablaze before retreating from the Japanese, Tenangyaung, 16 April 1942

23 April – troops of the Chinese Expeditionary Force held off the Japanese advances around Twingon, Burma, which allowed thousands of Allied troops into the area of Tenangyaung to escape the enemy’s surrounding net.  But, six days later, when the Chinese 55th Division were defeated in the northern zone, the Japanese forces reunited and together the divisions successfully cut the Burma Road.  On the 30th, General Stilwell, who was appalled by the Chinese leader’s corruption, dubbed Chiang Kai-shek “Peanut” for his do-nothing attitude, received permission to withdraw his troops to India.

"Daily Mirror" headlines of 29 April '42, Lashio-Mandalay Railway in danger, enemy 110 miles away!

“Daily Mirror” headlines of 29 April ’42, Lashio-Mandalay Railway in danger, enemy 110 miles away!

New Caledonia 1942

New Caledonia 1942

25 April – US troops landed on the Free French colony of New Caledonia.  The island’s capital, Nouméa became a major US naval base. [The “Boomer” generation might recall this island as the naval base where “McHale’s Navy” was stationed.  For the younger readers, this was a very popular sit-com about a bunch of misfit sailors during the war, staring Ernest Borgnine and Tim Conway.)

McHale's_Navy

30 April – during the heavy bombing and artillery fire transpiring on Corregidor, P.I., incredibly, 2 Navy PBY flying boats managed to land and take off again.  They were able to evacuate 50 people from ‘The Rock’, mostly from the female nursing staff.

Some nurses of Corregidor

Some nurses of Corregidor

To sum up April 1942: Doolittle’s Raid caused the Japanese Navy to overreact and deploy nearly every warship in the Imperial Combined Fleet.  They dispersed into far too many different operations over too great a distance.  One of the major objectives was their vital plan to sever the American sea route to Australia and allow the capture of Port Moresby, New Guinea.  The US Naval fleet and Admiral Nimitz, despite being aware that they lacked the strength of the Japanese, felt they could use their military intelligence against the enemy.

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Japanese Admiral Inouye developed a series of complex operations for both sides of the Coral Sea. [the US sea route].  This plan was virtually dependent on the element of surprise, but this major factor was foiled by the Australian Coastal Watching Service, when the radio outposts reported spotting the enemy in the upper Solomons.

Another mistake was made on the part of the Combined Fleet’s eagerness to disperse.  Their wide distribution and speed resulted in the failure to change their signalling codes.  Hence, intelligence outposts from Alaska to Australia were able to pick-up and de-code Japan’s messages, (code-named JN 25).  This uncovered every move the enemy made during the Second Operational Phase.

Military communiques of the world

Military communiques of the world

Click on images to enlarge.

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Military Humor –  the Old and the New

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The 5 Most Dangerous Things

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Farewell Salutes – border

William Ackerman – Granite Ridge, CAN; RC Navy

Edward Brooke III – Washington DC; US Army, WWII

Stanley Butlin – Birmington, UK; RAF, radio telecommunications 4rz348

Erland Coombs – Scarborough, ME; USMC, WWII, PTO, Purple Heart

Noel Ford – Christchurch, NZ; LAC No. 5 SU Air Force # 439576, WWII

Henry Guardino – El Centro, CA; USMC, Korea, radio operator

David Joy – Connerville, IN; USMC, Vietnam / US Army (15 years)

Helen McKinley – Jupiter, FL; civilian, Secretary to the Red Cross Field Director, WWII

Kenneth Staples – Stroudesburg, PA; UA Army Air Corps, WWII, F/187th/11th A/B

Fernand Tremblay Sr. – Meriden, CT; US Army, WWII, Sgt., Silver Star

Woody Whigam – Folkston, GA; US Army, WWII

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US Navy Birthday

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The US Navy traces its origins to the Continental Navy, which the Continental Congress established on 13 October 1775, by authorizing procurement, fitting out, manning and dispatch of two armed vessels to cruise in search of munitions ships supplying the British Army in America.  The legislation also established a Naval Committee to supervise the work.  All together, the Continental Navy numbered some 50 ships over the course of the war, with approximately 20 warships active at its maximum strength.

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cpohires

In 1972, Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral Elmo R. Zumwait, authorized recognition of 13 October as the Navy’s birthday.  Not to be confused with Navy Day (the founding of the Navy Department), the Navy Birthday is intended as an internal activity for members of the active forces and reserves, as well as retirees and dependents.  Since 1972, each CNO has encouraged a Navy-wide celebration of this occasion “to enhance a greater appreciation of our Navy heritage and to provide a positive influence toward pride and professionalism in the naval service.”

Although written by a Royal Navy Admiral in 1896, “The Laws of the Navy” began to appear in the US Naval Academy’s “Reef Points” Plebe Handbook and is still there today.  The sketches were added by Lt. Rowland Langmaid R.N. during WWI.

Beginning of "The Laws of the Navy"

Beginning of “The Laws of the Navy”

Part 2

Part 2

Part 3

Part 3

End of "The Laws of the Navy"

End of “The Laws of the Navy

Click on images to enlarge!

 

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HUMOR – 

FC

HAVE A BALL - BUT DON'T ROCK THE BOAT!!

HAVE A BALL – BUT DON’T ROCK THE BOAT!!

Lady Popeye

Lady Popeye

for you submariners

for you submariners

for you surface-vessel types...

for you surface-vessel types.

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Naval mystery – 

mysterious-plaque-by-midway-museum-commemorates-navys-200-year-anniversary

Fellow blogger  Cool San Diego Sights has been trying to locate the story behind a naval plaque embedded in a boulder.  The badly-corroded-mystery-plaque-shows-tallship-ironclad-early-warship-aircraft-carrier-and-jetsmonument was originally located at Broadway Pier, but was later moved near the USS Midway.  To read what information he discovered and/or add to the story___Please Click Here!

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FAREWELL SALUTES – 

Gene Acton = Wichita, KS; US Navy & civilian service w/ Boeing Aircraft

Wade “Buddy” Fitzek – Dunns Corners, RI; US Navy, WWII, USS Idaho

John Kohler – Hot Springs, AK; US Navy (Ret.), pilot systems, Vietnam, USS Kitty Hawk120507-M-0000C-005

Louis Marks – Arnaudville, LA; US Navy, Korea

Frank O’Malley – Ipswich, MA & Sarasota, FL; US Navy, WWII, Korea, pilot, USS Wasp & Midway

Edward Ouellet – Wellesley, MA; US Nay, WWII, PTO

John Overlease – Loveland, CO; US Navy, WWII, PTO

Marvin Sorensen – Race, WI; US Navy, Korea, USS Hawkins & Markab

Leo Speirs – Glines, UT; US Navy, WWII

Willis Wolfe – Oxnard, CA; US Navy, WWII, PTO, USS Waldron, recalled for Korea

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