John Finn, Oldest Medal of Honor Winner, Dies

gpcox:

ANOTHER STORY WE CERTAINLY WOULD NOT WANT TO FORGET!!

Originally posted on USNA or Bust!:

We will remember…

Retired Navy Lt. John Finn, the oldest Medal of Honor recipient from World War II, has died at his Southern California home. He was 100.


Navy Lt. Aaron Kakiel says Finn died early Thursday on his ranch near Live Oak Springs, where he lived for more than 50 years.


Finn earned the nation’s highest military valor award for his heroism during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. He received the Medal of Honor on Sept. 15, 1942, from then-President Franklin D. Roosevelt.
Born July 23, 1909, in Los Angeles, Finn was the oldest of the 97 Medal of Honor recipients still living.

View original 264 more words

Eye-witness Account

US Seaman, Victor E. Stefl

US Seaman, Victor E. Stefl

Victor E. Stefl

Seaman, US Navy

In the fall of 1941, I was a 19 year-old seaman not long out of the “Great Lakes” school (the US Navy boot camp).  My first assignment was aboard the USS Case, a Mahan-class destroyer commissioned in Boston in 1936.  We had sailed south from Pearl Harbor in November, toward New Zealand, then north again, crossing back and forth over the international dateline.

A few weeks later, as we returned to port, we were informed we would not be dry-docking.  The USS Shaw, we were told, had collided with another ship and would be occupying our ships space.  So we moored in a destroyer nest next the USS Whitney, (a destroyer tender), breaking down our main guns and performing general maintenance – – this was the condition of our ship when the Japanese showed up.

USS Case, Destroyer-370

USS Case, Destroyer-370

On the morning of 7 December, most of the officers were ashore.  I was lying in my bunk reading and looking forward to a quiet Sunday breakfast.  I heard an explosion, then several others.  I remember wondering who the heck was taking target practice on a Sunday.  Then one of my crewmates ran in and yelled, “Stef, get out of bed, the Japs are here?”

I was getting ready to tell him he was crazy when general quarters sounded.  I ran to my station and realized the gun I was assigned had been broken down for maintenance.  We scrambled to ready the 50 cals and gather ammunition.  Our officer of the deck, an ensign named Beard, had to break into the ammo locker because no one could locate a key.

370.number

We returned fire as soon as we could, but were limited as to when we could shoot.  If we fired on the Japanese aircraft as they leveled out for their torpedo runs we would be shooting across the harbor at our own men; so we had to wait for them to dive down before their runs or until they climbed out afterward.  Usually the Japanese turned toward the destroyers and strafed the hell out of us.  As the Japanese pilots flew between the masts they smiled and waved at us.  Obviously, that angered us.

During the attack a number of the crew were busy putting our main guns back together and making preparations for getting underway.  Many of my crewmates were trying to catch rides back to the ship on small transports; others simply swam.  We managed to down a few of the Japanese planes but not before they had inflicted heavy damage on the battleships.  After the attack was over, we threw all non-essential items overboard and took on fuel, food, water and ammunition.  When we got underway we cleared the harbor and depth charged an enemy sub.

USS Case - offical Navy log entries

USS Case – offical Navy log entries

Later on, we heard that the Shaw, sitting in our docking space had taken a direct hit.  I couldn’t help but think that it could have been us.  When night fell we darkened the ship and patrolled around Ford Island waiting for the Japanese to return.  That night was one of the scariest in my life.  At times we heard screams of wounded men trapped in the wreckage.  The only lights in the harbor were fires, which sometimes revealed bodies floating in the water.

Remember...

Remember…

Then, there were moments of almost complete silence, when the only sound we heard was the low hum of our ships in the harbor.  At such times we looked at each other and wondered just what the hell had we gotten into.  After 9 p.m., once we had been ordered to stand down, we spotted planes coming in over the harbor.  We opened up on them until the skipper ordered us to cease.  The Marines didn’t get the message and shot them down.  It turns out that those planes were American bombers scheduled to be delivered to the Army Air Force.  The rest of the night we circled the island and kept our eyes on the sky.

Victor Stefl was from Farmington Hills, Michigan.  He passed away October 2012 at the age of 90.

This story was taken directly from the ‘History Channel Magazine’ Jan/Feb 2013.  Images from the Stefl Family collection and US Naval History

Click on images to enlarge .

For a realistic view of Pearl Harbor, Mustang Koji supplied this video of footage, Click Here.

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Beetle Bailey – he knows how to keep things Top Secret!!

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Farewell Salutes – 

Keith Bosley – Sydney, Aus.; RA Air Force, Vietnam

courtesy, Cora @ A Fresh Start

courtesy, Cora @ A Fresh Start

Rudolph Dansby Jr.; WPalm Beach, FL, US Navy (Ret. 21 years)

Frank Fee – Harlan, KY; US Army, Sgt., Korea

Cyril Goetten – Jerseyville, IL; US Army, WWII

Christine Hartigan – Mission, KS; US Air Force, nurse, Captain, Vietnam

Alistair McLaggan – Forest Hill, NZ; Argyle & South Highlanders, WWII

John Sadeir – Edmonton, Can; RC Air Force, pilot, WWII (Ret)

Richard Ward – Oro Valley, AZ; USMC, F-4 Black Knights

Larry Zoski – Bartiesville, OK; US Army, Sgt. Vietnam, 2nd Batt/9th Inf.Div/4th Field Artillery

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Orel Pierson and the SS President Harrison

SS "President Harrison"

SS “President Harrison”

TWO EYE-WITNESS ACCOUNTS

The SS President Harrison was a part of the American President Lines which was chartered by the US Navy on a day-to-day basis; when they could serve their country.  In the words that follow of Master Orel A. Pierson, they were under the orders of Admiral Hart and “on the drum” of the Cavite Naval Radio.  This meant, they were in constant contact, on a specified frequency and had a secret call letter.

Master Orel Pierson

Master Orel Pierson

“At the Torres Straits, here we were informed that we would proceed to Hong Kong as a transport and proceed to Shanghai together with the SS President Madison to evacuate the US 4th Marines.  On 3 December, we made a rendezvous off Formosa with 4 US submarines and with their guns mounted ready for instant action.  We proceeded to Olongapoo, Philippines.  At this time, it was apparent to all that war was imminent.  We noted and reported that Japanese Naval units and transports were steaming south in large numbers.

“We left Manila on the morning of 4 December 1941 with a crew of 154… On arrival at Chingwangtao, we were to pick up around 300 Marines of the Peking & Trintsin Legation Guard and some 1400 tons of equipment and return to Manila.

“Tension was mounting… The destination of the Harrison, [supposed to be secret], was the talk of every hotel and bar room in Manila… I was later informed by the captain of a Japanese destroyer that ‘they knew all about our movements.'”

Port of Shanghai bides the 4th Marines a fond farewell.

Port of Shanghai bids the 4th Marines a fond farewell.

The SS President Harrison was ultimately captured along with the largest group of merchant seamen.  The cargo supposedly included the fossils known as “Peking Man” whose whereabouts remains a mystery today is open to various speculations.  The ship was turned into the Kakka Maru and then the name was changed to Kachidoki Maru, which was torpedoes by the submarine, USS Pampanito.  It is now restored and a museum ship in San Francisco, California.

Orel Pierson was taken prisoner and spent most of his three years and 9 month confinement at Zentsuji War Prison Camp on Shikoko Island.  He was transferred 23 June 1945 to Nokoroshu Camp in western Honshu, Japan until liberated 2 September.

China coast

China coast

“The story of my years in prison camps closely parallels that of any American held by the Japanese, with all the heartaches, abuses, uncertainties and slow starvation accorded to them in the military prisons.  I lost 85 pounds, need I say more.”

This story was taken and condensed from the SS President Harrison Master’s Report, US Naval History.

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The "Harrison" as the "Kachidoki Maru."

The “Harrison” as the “Kachidoki Maru.”

Also aboard the SS President Harrison was Hank Behren, a college student who took a year off school for a little adventure and to earn money for his next term – he became a Merchant seaman.  Once back home, he finished school, bought a home and married. (Once freed, merchant seamen were not entitled to G.I. benefits).  In 1981, Hank returned to China and found the old prison camp.  His guide was an elderly Japanese man and Behren asked the man where he was during WWII.  It turned out, he was the captain of a gunboat that patrolled the Whanpoo River.  Hank couldn’t believe it!  From his POW camp  he had watched the boat patrol up and down the river while he enjoyed the old Japanese folk songs the guards played on their gramophone.

When Hank returned home, the old captain sent a cassette of the folk songs to him and the two men corresponded until Hank passed away.  Two years before he died, the U.S. presented Hank with a military discharge and a POW medal.

Hank Behren’s story was found in “The Greatest Generation Speaks” by Tom Brokaw and condensed.

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Dr. Seuss continued to dig with his political cartoons______

seuss_war1

Click images to enlarge.

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Farewell Salutes – 

Peter Bennish – Norvet, PA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, HQ Co/187th Regiment

Robert Carlson – Elgin, IL; US Navy, Korea

courtesy: Cora from 'A Fresh Start'

courtesy: Cora from ‘A Fresh Start’

Ralph Federson – Mesa, AZ; US Navy, WWII

Hector Hotte – Ottawa, Can; RC Army, WWII

Richard Lowe – Des Moines, IA; US Navy, WWII, gunner’s mate

Mary McGovern – Portland, ME; WWII, civilian employee , stenographer/Military Intelligence Service

Richard Siedel – Alamogordo, NM; USMC, WWII, 91st Chemical Mortar Co/6th Marine Division

Vernon Staum – Winder, GA; US Army, Lt. to Lt.Col., Korea and Vietnam

William Throp – Napier, NZ; Service # 288446, WWII

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Loss of a fellow blogger – I discovered yesterday from Tina Blackledge, that Ajay Mody, better know to us as, Ajaytoa, passed away 10 August.  May he rest in peace.

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National Airborne Day

 

11thabn

Click on image to read.

16 August 1940 was the first official U.S. Army parachute jump.

Everett "Smitty" Smith, 11th A/B, New Guinea

Everett “Smitty” Smith, 11th A/B, New Guinea – my dad.

 

On 14 August 2002, President George W. Bush issued a proclamation to honor the troopers with their own commemorative day – which can be found HERE>

 

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3 August 2009, the U.S. Senate recognized National Airborne Day with Senate Resolution 235.

 

HERE’S TO EACH AND EVERYONE OF YOU!!

THANK YOU !!

THANK YOU !!

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From Smitty’s scrapbook_______

From Everett Smith's real scrapbook/ glider and jump training

From Everett Smith’s real scrapbook/ glider and jump training

Click on photos to enlarge.

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Farewell Salutes – 

Bert Vincent Brickle – Christchurch, NZ; RNZ Army # 447652, WWII, ETO, ( Fellow blogger, Galivanta [Ann]‘s cousin)

Peter Gritis – Reston, VA; US Army, LtColonel, WWII, ETO, 7th Armored Division

Pedro Hernandez – Crystal, MN; US Army, WWII & Korea, 82nd Airbornejohncmaxwell383606

Nicholas Kremer – Cascade, IA; US Army Air Force, WWII paratrooper, ETO, Purple Heart

Maurice O’Toole – Toronto, CAN, RAF, pilot

Charles Skapik – Charlerol, PA; US Army Air Force, 457th Artillery/11th Airborne, WWII, PTO

Vince Tancredi – Windham, NY; US Army Air Corps, 503rd Reg., paratrooper

John Wheeler – Canton, CT; US Army Air Corps, WWII, 82nd Airborne

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V- J Day

Remembering V - J Day

Remembering V – J Day

THE STRIFE IS OVER, THE BATTLES DONE,

THE VICTORY OF WAR IS WON!!

When the news that Japan had surrendered spread, the rest of world gave thanks and celebrations erupted______

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Most believe that it was the ultimate might of the Atomic bomb that ended the war in the Pacific.  But this is not entirely the case; the Japanese military were still firm in their belief that an Allied invasion was the “golden opportunity” and “divine chance” they had been waiting for.  Create must be given to” the Jushin, a group of former premiers, the senior statesmen of Japan, who worked behind the scenes and through the Emperor for surrender – They ended the war.”

_______quoted from Pacific War, by Saburo Ienaga

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Farewell Salutes – 

Robert Adcock – Palmerston North, NZ; Service # 459672, WWII

Daniel Erdman Jr. – Mechanicburg, PA; US Army, 43rd Signal Corps, PTO

Sidney Gold – Philadelphia, PA; USMC, Lt., WWII, PTO, present at the signingveterans-day-4

Gilbert Hillier – Colliers, CAN; RC Army, Korea

Irving Johnson – Sanibel, FL; US Navy, WWII, PTO

Edward Loftus – Phoenix, AZ; USMC, WWII, 2nd Marine Division, PTO

Gabriel Perle – Greenwich, CT; US Navy, Lt., WWII, PTO

Robert Scharf – Detroit, MI & Wellington, FL; US Army, WWII, PTO

Thomas Vecchio – Palo Alto, CA; US Army, Medical Corps

Bobby Walters – Alpharetta, GA, US Navy, WWII

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Late Addition – 

An Australian dances for joy!!  From a Movitone film at U-tube.

An Australian dances for joy!! From a Movitone film at U-tube.

Australia celebrates!!!  The sweater remains at a museum.

Australia celebrates!!! The sweater remains at a museum.

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7 December 1941 (2)

 
Pearl Harbor view from a Japanese fighter

Pearl Harbor view from a Japanese fighter

0749 hours – “ToToToToTo” went out to all Japanese pilots (the first 2 letters of ‘Totsugeki!’  CHARGE!), and the torpedo bombers proceeded to sweep Battleship Row.  “Tora! Tora! Tora!” was sent out next.  The code, Tiger! Tiger! Tiger! was sent 5000 miles to the “Akagi” for Admiral Yamamoto to be aware that the Strike Force had indeed caught the US Navy by surprise; the Admiral read the message and then continued his game of Shogi with his staff gunnery officer, Watanabe.
Three civilian planes safely landed back on Oahu after being caught in the maelstrom of tracer bullets.
Shanghai Harbor under attack

Shanghai Harbor under attack

1000 hours – In Shanghai, China, Lt Comdr. Columbus Smith was woken up by a call from the HMS “Wake” to make a report on the attack of Pearl Harbor.  He immediately rushed to scuttle his command, but was promptly arrested by Japanese guards.
1130 hours – over Singapore, the 5am streetlights directed the Japanese planes to the city.  The Changi Naval Base, and British ships, “Prince of Wales” and “Repulse” returned antiaircraft fire.
 
USS Cassin & Downs

USS Cassin & Downs

 

On Formosa, the Japanese planes of the 11th Air Fleet were grounded by fog and were unable make their scheduled attack on Luzon.
1257 hours –  Guam was bombed by the Japanese navy bombers from Saipan.  The Marine barracks were destroyed and the USS “Penguin” was sunk.
 
USS Penquin

USS Penquin

 

 
1300 hours –  36 Japanese bombers left Roi in the Marshall Islands and strafed Wake Island.  Lacking radar, the fighter planes recently delivered by the “Enterprise” had only 15 seconds warning; 7 of them were destroyed on the ground.  Twelve Marines and 6 civilians of the Pan Am Hotel were killed.  A Marine survivor said, “The pilots in every one of those planes was grinning wildly.  Every one wiggled his wings to signify Banzai.”
The Pan Am flying boat, “Philippine Clipper”, escaped with 23 bullet holes in her as she carried 70 airline personnel and the             wounded from the island.  Pilot Capt. Hamilton radioed back that an enemy cruiser with destroyers was headed toward Wake.
 
Ford Island Air Station & USS Shaw

Ford Island Air Station & USS Shaw

1400 hours –  Hong Kong was attacked by 35 enemy bombers.  MGen. C.M. Maltby knew Britain would not defend the possession, but he was ordered to “hold out as long as possible.”
1500 hours –  With the fog lifted on Formosa, Luzon was attacked by 32 Japanese Army bombers and 192 of their Navy’s 11th Air Fleet took off to follow through.
Clark Field, Nov. 1941

Clark Field, Nov. 1941

1730 hours – a radar operator at Iba Field, Luzon spotted the Japanese squadron approaching and transmitted the data to Clark Field, but the teletype operator was literally out to lunch.  In a series of mistakes,  MacArthur had erred in underrating his enemy.
2200 hours –  Counterattacks at Kota Bharu failed.  This prompted the Australian commander to request permission to evacuate his remaining planes 150 miles south.  Ground personnel and civilians left the town as the surviving Indian troops stayed to make a final stand.
 
Cynthia Olson SS

Cynthia Olson SS

 
Also on this date, but the hour unknown, the US cargo ship “Cynthia Olson” loaded with lumber for Hawaii was torpedoed by the enemy submarine I-26 and sunk in the Pacific, 1200 miles west of Seattle, with the loss of 35 men.  
 

On that first night, as the world turned into another day, a darkness, never before known, fell over the Pacific culminating 24 hours of unmitigated disaster.  Only the British Prime Minister went to bed content, “So, we have won after all.  Being saturated and satiated with emotion and sensation, I went to bed and slept the sleep of the sound and thankful”_____Winston Churchill

Click on any image to enlarge.

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Political Cartoons of the times_________

 

 U_S_-declares-war-3Winds-of-War-8-Oct-41 (697x800)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Personal Note……  

It has been a while since I’ve given the veterans and volunteers of Little Rock, Arkansas a renewed Shout Out!!  I sincerely hope you are all enjoying this web site – this includes you too, Tom DeGrom!  I have spies out there and I want to hear that you are all doing well!  
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Farewell Salutes – 

Harry Alsman Sr. – LeClaire, IA; US Navy, Korea

Richard Bolt – Wellington, NZ; RNZ Air Force, Air Marshal, Chief of Defense Staff (Ret.)

James Chase – Chatman, MA; US Army, HQ Company, 11th A/B (Ret. 20 years)

Robert DePledge – Invermere, BC, Can; RC Armywwii-memorial-011me

Everett (Pat) Emmick – Loxahatchee, FL; US Army, Vietnam, Bronze Star

Eugene Knobbe – Boynton Beach, FL; US Army, Korea

Andrew Manchester Sr. – No. Branford, CT; US Army Air Corps. WWII, B-17 top turret gunner, 15th & 8th Army, ETO, No. Africa

Leonard Pilarski – Nesconset, NY; US Army Air Corps, WWII, F Co/511th Reg.

Charles Roberts, Jr. – Kansas City, MO; USMC, BrigGeneral, Korea & Vietnam, Purple Heart

Harry Stamos – Hendersonville, NC; US Army, WWII, Signal Corps, ETO

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THANK YOU FOR THE CORRECTION, ALLEN.

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Purple Heart Day

Purple Heart patch for those wounded in WWII

Purple Heart patch for those wounded in WWII

 

On this date in 1782, in Newburgh, New York, General George Washington created the “Badge for Military Merit,” a decoration consisting of a purple, heart-shaped piece of silk, edged in silver, with the word Merit etched.  It was to be presented for any one meritorious action and it permitted the wearer to pass guards and sentinels without challenge.   The honoree’s name and regiment were to be inscribed in “The Book of Merit.”

Purple Heart certificate given during the Korean War

Purple Heart certificate given during the Korean War

Only three soldiers are known to have been awarded this medal during the Revolutionary War: Elijah Churchill, William Brown and Daniel Bissell Jr.  The Book of Merit was lost and the medal was virtually forgotten.  In 1927, General Charles Summerall  sent an unsuccessful draft bill to Congress to revive the Badge.

Patch for Afghanistan

Patch for Afghanistan

General Douglas MacArthur took up the cause, hoping to get the medal reinstated for the bicentennial of George Washington’s birthday.  He succeeded – 22 February 1932 the US War Department announced the creation of the “Order of the Purple Heart.”

National Purple Heart Hall of Honor, New Windsor, NY

National Purple Heart Hall of Honor, New Windsor, NY

This medal is awarded to members of the US Armed Forces who have been killed or wounded in action against an enemy.  It is also given to soldiers who have suffered maltreatment as prisoners of war.

The 'impersonal chaos of war' display in the Hall of Honor

The ‘impersonal chaos of war’ display in the Hall of Honor

The most Purple Hearts awarded to any individual soldier is nine (9) to USMC Sergeant Albert Luke Ireland; five (5) for World War II and four (4) for his action in the Korean War.

"Wounded Warrior" painting by U.S. Marine Michael Fay

“Wounded Warrior” painting by U.S. Marine Michael Fay

The estimates for each war read as:

WWI – 320,518
 
WWII – 1,076,245
 
Korea – 118, 650
 
Vietnam – 351, 794
 
Persian Gulf – 607
 
Iraq – 34,000
 
Afghanistan – 2,700
 
 
 
Click on images to enlarge.

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Farewell Salutes – 

DeWayne Anderson – Arvada, CO; US Army, WWII & Korea, @ Bronze Stars, Purple Heart

Purple Heart

Purple Heart

Mo Breeding – Oklahoma City, OK; US Army, WWII & Korea, Silver Star, 2 Bronze Stars & Purple Heart

William Bush – Utica, NY & New Smyrna Bch, FL; US Naby, Vietnam, Purple Heart

Melvin Chubb – Joplin, MO; US Air Force, Lt. General, Vietnam, 500 combat missions, Purple Heart

Carl Donica Jr. – Springfield, MO; US Navy, corpsman, Vietnam, Purple Heart

Peter Duchscherer – Fairbanks, AK; US Army, Vietnam, Purple Heart

Harold Greene – New York, US Army, MGeneral, Afghanistan, Purple Heart

Herbert Harkey Jr. – Riverside County, CA; USMC, LtCol. (Ret. 27 yrs.), 2 tours Vietnam, Bronze Star, Purple Heart

William Kunz – Rockford, IL; US Army, 3rd InfantryDiv., WWII, ETO, Bronze Star, Purple Heart

Charles Roth – Des moines, IA; US Army, WWII, ETO, Bronze Star, Purple Heart

James Tucker – Las Vegas, NV; US Army, medic, Purple Heart

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Evacuation to The Pen

gpcox:

A PART OF 7 DECEMBER 1941 THAT VERY FEW THINK ABOUT_____

Originally posted on The Hong Kong Heritage Project [HKHP]:

The Peninsula Hotel, 1950s

On Monday morning, 7 December 1941, Luba (Skvorzov) Estes was getting ready to go to school, when she heard the sounds of bombing which were getting louder and louder. “I was terrified and could see from a balcony of our house on Kadoorie Avenue in Kowloon, carpet bombing by Japanese aircraft coming over us. That day, instead of going to school, my sister, Loula (Skvorzov) Ballerand, my mother, Lalia Skvorzov, and I stayed in a nearby air-raid shelter. At 9 PM my father, in the blackout and in his Hong Kong Volunteer Defence Corps (HKVDC) uniform, took us to The Peninsula Hotel where an evacuation center was being organized for families to leave the mainland. The danger was that the Japanese would occupy Kowloon first. So we were to spend the night in the beautiful Pen Lobby.”

A.V Skvorzov joined HKVDC, with daughter Luba Estes wearing school uniform c. 1939 A.V Skvorzov joined HKVDC, with daughter Luba Estes wearing…

View original 200 more words

7 December 1941 (1)

 
Japanese Type 00 fighters just proir to take-off. Courtesy Japanese Archives

Japanese Type 00 fighters just proir to take-off.
Courtesy Japanese Archives

1200 hours – the lights of Waikiki Beach, Oahu, Hawaii were visible from the 2-man units of Commander Nagi Iwasa’s Special Attack Force 4 midget submarines.  An hour later, they reached the booms that guarded the mile-wide mouth to the U.S. Pacific Fleet’s anchorage.
Orders for the men of the USS "Enterprise"

Orders for the men of the USS “Enterprise”

0300 hours – The crew of the Japanese aircraft, from 6 carriers, ate a celebratory breakfast, donned their “thousand-stitch” good luck belts, left family letters with clippings of hair and fingernails with their belongings and drank their sake toasts.  At their final briefing, Commander Mitsuo Fushida wrote, “the room was not large enough for all the men, some of whom had to stand in the passageway.  On the blackboard was written the positions of ships in Pearl Harbor as of 0600 hours 7 December. (Tokyo time).
0430 hours –  one midget submarine crept past Keanpapuaa Point and found the boom open to admit 2 minesweepers.  It circled Ford Island and logged in the warships through its periscope.
Japanese midget submarine

Japanese midget submarine

0530 hours –  with the Pearl Harbor Strike Force now 200 miles north of Oahu, seaplanes left the cruisers “Tone” and “Chikuma” to make predawn recon sweeps of Pearl Harbor and Lahaina while rows of attack aircraft were loaded up.  On the north Malayan coast, the enemy arrived at Kota Bharu, while the pillboxes and defenses manned by the 9th Indian Army Division were bombed.   Gen. Percival called the Governor to alert him, and Sir Shenton Thomas replied, “Well, I suppose you’ll shove the little men off.”
 
o600 hours –   the first planes to leave the Japanese Strike Force’s 6 carriers: 183 aircraft – 49 Val bombers with winged armor-piercing shells; 40 “Kates”, each with oxygen-powered Long Lance Torpedoes and an escort of 43 Zero fighters.  They joined up and went into formation for an estimated 90 minute flight.  The Imperial Navy battle ensign was broken out above Togo’s famous Z pendant signal at the “Akagi’s masthead as Fushida fastened the Hachimaki headband given to him from the crew.
0637 hours –  A midget submarine was spotted by the destroyer, USS “Ward,” as the booms opened again to allow the “Antares” into the harbor.  At 0645 hours, LtComdr. William Outerbridge ordered a gunfire and depth charge attack.  A report was transmitted, but given low priority.  See the after-action report below____
After-action report for the USS "Ward"

After-action report for the USS “Ward”

0700 hours – one of 3 US PBY flying boats, on submarine patrol, depth-charged a different attack and also signaled his report in code back to the base – the message took more than half an hour to be passed for circulation.  The 2-man crew of the Army radar post at Opana spotted unusual blips on the screen – they were told: “Don’t worry about it.”
Bachok Beach, Kota Bharu, Malaya.  Japanese landing point.

Bachok Beach, Kota Bharu, Malaya. Japanese landing point.

0730 hours (0130 hours in Singapore) – The first strike of 7 December was at Kota Bharu, northern Malaya, one hour and 20 minutes before Pearl Harbor.  In pouring rain and rough seas, the 5,000 troops of Gen. Yamashita’s 56th Infantry Regiment went ashore at Singora Beach without firing a shot.
0735 hours – Fushida’s command plane listened to a Hawaiian radio station as the aircraft flew over Kahuka Point, Oahu.
 
………..To be continued……..
 
Click on images to enlarge.
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Political cartoon of the times____

Dr. Seuss gives his opinion again….

jeez - how did that happen?

jeez – how did that happen? – check the War Warnings posts if you missed them

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Current news isn’t all bad____

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Farewell Salutes – 

Joseph Baker, Mesa, AZ; US Army, WWII, Bronze Star

Thomas Decker – Quincy, IL; US Navy, WWII, USS  Hull & Endicott

Doyle Engle – Grays Knob, KY; US Army, Vietnam304229_408732649208035featured_1689121699_ne

Thomas Heran – W.Palm Bch, FL; US Air Force, Korea

Elizabeth Knowles – Bangor, ME; WAVES, WWII, Phar.Mate First Class

James Lattanzio Sr. – Rockville, CT; US Army, WWII, 3rd Battery/390 Infantry Regiment

John Phillips – Des Moines, IA; USMC, Korea

Thomas Vecchio – Palo Alto, CA; US Army, Medical Corps

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A Paratrooper’s Faith and a Legacy of Love

gpcox:

A BREAK IN THE ROUTINE TO HONOR A PARATROOPER WHO FOUGHT ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE GLOBE AND HIS MOTHER WHO FOUGHT AT HOME. (NEAR THE BOTTOM – PLEASE FIND WHERE TO “CLICK HERE” TO VIEW THE CONTENTS OF THE BOOK)

Originally posted on TalesAlongTheWay:

 FIGHTER FAITH
 by Jason Ladd
 This is my family story about a brother who gave his life for freedom, long before my birth,  and my mama who used her unspeakable pain and sacrifice to inspire and encourage soldiers going forth, and even today.   Anne 
 

a paratroopers faith

Green Light

On June 5th, 1944, high above a war raging in Europe, a paratrooper’s faith helped calm a 20-year-old soldier from the 82nd Airborne Division. The vibration of the military transport plane might have put George to sleep if not for the peril he was about to face. He was about to jump under cover of darkness into occupied France with fellow paratroopers from 507th Parachute Infantry Regiment. He closed his eyes and recalled a quote he memorized long ago:

Hard things…

View original 822 more words

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