East and West (5)

Men of Burma who signed up.

Men of Burma who signed up.

Up until 1937, the 20 Burma Rifles were a regiment within the Indian Army.  It was then later made part of a separate Burma Army.  Being as the country was considered by most to be “backwater” and unlikely to be included in any war, this army was still in its infancy as 1941 evolved.

Royal Netherland East Indies forces

Royal Netherland East Indies forces

On the Netherland East Indies (NEI), known today as Indonesia, had the Royal Netherland East Indies forces for defense, but they were literally cut off from their government due to the actions of Hitler in Europe.  This military was no match for the highly trained Japanese invaders and after being under the thumb of the Dutch for so long, the civilians welcomed a change.  Their minds were quickly snapped into reality as the Japanese proceeded to drain their resources and dissolve any personal freedoms they had.  The oil and metal ores of Marai, Sumatra, Java, Borneo and the Celebes were the ultimate goals for Japan.

The Automedon

The Automedon

December 1940, the Japanese obtained top secret British documents, by way of Germany, when the Axis raider, the Atlantis captured the British Blue Funnel cargo liner, the Automedon on 11 November as it sailed for Singapore.  These papers were minutes from the British War Cabinet meeting which showed a blueprint of their Far East strategy and that Britain would not declare war on Japan if Thailand and Hong Kong were invaded – they were considered indefensible.  For further information and/or clarification, please visit Martin’s site at War and Security to be found HERE!!

The US considered increasing Guam’s defenses during and after WWII, but no action was taken due to the 1922 Washington Naval Conference between the US and Japan.  In 1941, Guam had about 85 miles of roadways and Apra Harbor was considered the best in the Marianas, but there was no airfield.  Japanese plans for invasion were completed for Guam in September and their 144th Infantry Regiment and some other units (approx. 4,886 men) were kept in Korea until November.

Guam postcard, 1940's

Guam postcard, 1940′s

The Guam Insular Force Guard, a locally-manned militia were assigned for the naval base and on 17 October 1941, dependents of US military personnel and 100 construction workers began to evacuate. (IMO – it appeared someone was aware of something brewing.)

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Political cartoon of the times - 

Dr. Seuss' attack on prejudice.

Dr. Seuss’ attack on prejudice.

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Current tidbits of news - 

Courtesy of "The Week" magazine

Courtesy of “The Week” magazine

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Farewell Salutes - 

Howard Bock – Newark, DE; US Air Force, MSgt.(Ret. 30 years), Air Weather Service

Carol Chivala – Sedona, AZ; Flight Nurse for the Flying Tigers, Koreaflag04

William Eslin – Urbana, MD; US Air Force, Korea

Leonard Charles Griffiths – NZ; RNZ Army # 443224, WWII, 23rd Battalion, Pvt.

Donald James – Coventry, CT & Lake Park, FL; US Navy (22years), WWII, PTO

Mary Hutton – Ontario, Can; RC Army nurse, WWII

John MacDonald – Syracuse & Massapequa, NY; US Navy, Vietnam

Joseph Nachreiner – Cheekstowaga, NY; US Army Air Corps, 457th Artillery, 11th A/B, WWII, PTO

Ronald Wishart – NY &FL; American Field Service, WWII, drove an ambulance in Burma for the Indian Army

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East and West (4)

Germans amass on Norway coast, 9 April 1940

Germans amass on Norway coast, 9 April 1940

Although the April 1940 fiasco in Norway was Churchill’s responsibility as the First Lord of the Admiralty, Chamberlain paid the political price.  Winston Churchill became the Prime Minister of Great Britain and her Empire, yet he remained dismissive of Japan, her own power, and wanted nothing less than an all-out war with Germany.

Norwegian village burned during a battle, April 1940

Norwegian village burned during a battle, April 1940

The book, The Great Betrayal: Britain, Australia & the Onset of the Pacific War 1939-42, by David Day, explains the problems in detail that faced Australia, the ambitions of Menzies and the danger both New Zealand and Australia teetered on during this period far better than I can in my limited space.

Wirraway

Wirraway

As the date for Japan’s ‘Operation Z’ to commence crept ever closer, Australia’s obligation of compliance with British imperatives, left the country with no aircraft capable of meeting Japanese fighters.  The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) had 170 aircraft (on paper), including 53 Hudsons (20 in the Netherland East Indies); 57 Wirraways and assorted training planes. The RAAF was commanded by British Air Chief, Marshall Burnett, whose main objective was to produce more trained men for Europe and the Middle East.  When New Zealand sent her 3rd Division overseas, Australia followed suit by deploying her 6th Division.  The RAN was basically taken over by the British Admiralty.

Lockheed-Hudson

Lockheed-Hudson

August 1941, after the Newfoundland meeting of Allied powers, General Pownall, Vice Chief of the Imperial General Staff was quoted as saying, “Roosevelt was all for coming into the war and as soon as possible…but he said he would never declare war, he wishes to provoke it.  He wants to create an incident that brings war about, being no doubt sure that he would be fully supported by his people.”

As Pan-American Airways inaugurated its flights to New Zealand, Australia continued to deny access to Sydney.  (This was on orders from Churchill.)  Churchill was still asserting his rash promise of support for New Zealand, Australia and Singapore – a vow he now stated with the stipulation    - “should they be invaded.”

In New Zealand, preparations were published for her people, in the event of such an invasion and this is covered by fellow blogger and avid historian, Lemuel @ History Geek and can be found HERE!!

Despite the constitutional fall-out of Britain’s declaration of war on behalf of India (and without representation), the British could indeed rely on India’s support in the war.  An expeditionary force of mule transport companies provided back up in France and 24 pilots were immediately sent to the RAF in 1940.

To be continued…

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Political cartoon of the times…

Scripps-Howard

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Farewell Salutes -

Floyd Brittain – Sacramento, CA; US Army, WWII, ETOMarine-Bugler

Mary Branum – Scammon, KS; Aux. Military Police, WWII

Carl Carrick – Warner Robbins, GA; US Air Force, MSgt. (Ret. 29 years)

Bruce Davis – Ottawa, Can.; Cameron Highlanders, WWII

James Garner – Brentwood, CA; US 5th Regimental Combat Team, Korea, 2 Purple Hearts, [beloved actor for 50 years]

Robert Hindle – N.Z.; RNZ Air Force # 433203 LAC RL

Robert Jacoby – Park Ridge, NJ; US Navy, WWII, PTO, “Nautilus” submarine

Joe Lanear – Phoenix, AZ; US Air Force, Korea

Leland Newell – Melbourne, FL; US Air Force, Flight Surgeon

Walter Reilly – W>Palm Bch, FL; US Navy, submarine service

Timothy Sloan – Lafayette, LA; US Army, Korea, A CO/188th RCT

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Warbirds Over Geneseo: Part I

gpcox:

Everyone seems to enjoy the aviation posts, so…..

Originally posted on BARREL DISTORTION:

The National Warplane Museum’s annual airshow in Geneseo, New York, is billed as “The Greatest Show On Turf,” owing to its grass field and the numerous vintage airplanes that fly during one weekend a year in July. Just south of Rochester and on the Western edge of the famed Finger Lakes region in upstate New York, the small airport sits in a valley below the quaint town of Geneseo; its short, solitary grass runway flanked by farm fields. The bucolic surrounds mirror the rural ease of the airshow itself. Unlike the loud, crowded air shows on military bases, Geneseo has a laid-back, pastoral feel that permits visitors to contemplate the history on display in front of them.

The 2014 edition of the show had at least three crown jewels on display: a P-38 Lightning from the Fagen Fighters WWII Museum in Granite Falls, Minnesota beautifully flown by Rob Ator; The

View original 597 more words

East and West (3)

FDR & Cordell Hull, 1940

FDR & Cordell Hull, 1940

If Manchuria was controlled, the Japanese felt they would have the advantage over Russia.  Since the Chiang Nationalist government did wish to spend the money or the energy to combat Japan – but – still have communism squelched in the country, Manchuria was given up.

When the US started economic sanctions in 1939, Japan required new territories to supply their resources.  They issued a request to the French  for permission to enter Indo-China.  In September 1940, the Vichy government agreed.  The southeast portion of Asia was occupied, without incident, by the Japanese on 27-29 July 1941.

Vichy government, 1939

Vichy government, 1939

The US was incensed and proceeded to convince other countries to freeze Japan’s assets; the ABCD, (American, British, Canada, Dutch), power’s economic blockade began.  By mid-1941, relations between Japan and the ABCD countries had basically reached a point of no return.  The New York Times newspaper called this action, “…the most drastic blow short of war.”

The Japanese newspaper's transport aircraft "Asagumo", a MC-20-I, 1940's

The Japanese newspaper’s transport aircraft “Asagumo”, a MC-20-I, 1940′s

FDR knew he had stretched the Lend Lease Program far beyond what was even known to Congress, and he was becoming nervous with the secrecy.  When the embargo was extended, the Tokyo newspaper, A Saki Shimbun (Morning Sun Newspaper), predicted: “It seems inevitable that a collision should occur between Japan, determined to establish a sphere of influence in East Asia including the southwest Pacific, and the US which is determined to meddle in the affairs on the other side of a vast ocean by every means short of war.”

Chiang Kai-shek, 1940

Chiang Kai-shek, 1940

Making the world situation much worse, FDR did not give the Australians the defense commitment it needed.  Yet, he did promise Chiang Kai-shek 50 pursuit planes and $100 million in financial assistance. (This was despite Madame Chiang’s insistence that the money was being siphoned by the government officials and military leaders.)  With all of Washington’s plans in play by the spring of 1941, Admiral Stark told Admiral Kimmel: “The question of our entry into the war now seems to be when, not whether.”  In Japan – Operation Z was a sure plan.

Prime Minister Konoye, 1939

Prime Minister Konoye, 1939

By this time, Cordell Hull was following the specific instructions of FDR.  Konoye in Tokyo agreed to abnegate the Tripartite Pact in his quest for peace, but Washington adamantly insisted there was “no meeting of the minds.”  Konoye, despite an attempt on his life, sent a last desperate plea to meet and talk with Roosevelt before his 15 October deadline — there was no response from D.C. and he was forced to resign as Prime Minister.

By Novemeber 1941, the US Joint Chiefs of Staff were investigating which Japanese cities were strategically most important to bomb.

 

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Current news - 

The Olympian who had his obituary written 70 years ago!

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Please click on image to read the amazing story recently in “The Week” magazine.

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Farewell Salutes - 

James Bogan – Ocala, FL; US Navy, Korea

Lawrence Brown – Morton, IL; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, C-47 engineer

Lloyd Doody – Windsor, MR; US Army (Ret. 33 years), Vietnamroseglitterdivider_thumb

Philippe Grignon – Keswick, CAN; RC Air Force, WWII, Flight Lt.

Thomas Kenny – Cradell, NJ; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 187th RCT, 11th A/B

Carl “Dal” Maas – Davenport, IA; US Marine Corps, WWII, PTO, 6th Marines

Alexander Morton – Detroit, MI & Palm Bch, FL; US Air Force, Vietnam

Kenneth Reynolds – Stuart, FL; US Navy, WWII, ETO, Naval Combat Demolition Team, 2 Bronze Stars

Christopher Scarrott – Christchurch, NZ; RNZ Army # 768057

Stanley Walega – Manchester, NH; US Army, Korea

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East and West (2)

 

The caption should read, "Tenno HEIKA banzai"

The caption should read, “Tenno HEIKA banzai”

Caption correction of the shout is courtesy of Mustang Koji who can be found HERE!!

Click photo to read caption.

On 18 February 1931, the League of Nations, with America in the lead, issued the “Nonrecognition Doctrine” which pushed Japan’s anger even further.  [ to read what is also known as the Stimson Doctrine - click HERE!!   US Ambassador Joseph Grew in Tokyo persisted in his warnings against this action.  But, even the in-coming president [FDR] and Secretary of State, Cornell Hull argued for the status quo.

Ambassador Joseph Grew, 1939

Ambassador Joseph Grew, 1939

Stimson w/ the Doctrine, 1939

Stimson w/ the Doctrine, 1939

In 1936, FDR and his drive for naval appropriations caused 50,000 veterans to stage a March for Peace in front of the White House.  Children were organized under a banner of “Money for schools, not battleships.”  Privately, FDR raged about isolationists and pacifists as early as 1937 when he held a rally in Chicago in the attempt to gain support to “quarantine” Japan.  The Japanese quest to become a major world power became their primary goal.

In 1939, FDR sent $25 million to the Chunking government to carry on their war with Japan; while Britain told Australia and New Zealand not to worry – the US would not remain indifferent to the Japanese threat in the Far East.  The Australian Prime Minister told the Canberra Parliament, “What Great Britain calls the Far East is to us the Near North.”  Richard Casey met with the British Foreign Office and was told, “the defense of the territories in the Pacific would be determined by the needs in Europe” – they were virtually being abandoned.

FDR campaigning in Warms Springs, GA, 4 April 1939

FDR campaigning in Warms Springs, GA, 4 April 1939

By January 1940, Churchill was cabling FDR daily for more aircraft and supplies to help Britain keep good its promise, “We shall never surrender;” under the Lend Lease Program, [which was being stretched beyond its legal limits more and more each day].  Japan’s growing power was being ignored.  What was commonly misunderstood by Western cultures was that the Japanese Army and Navy Ministries were part of the governmental structure and the military was gaining power each day.

The British interwar plans for a conflict with Japan as early as 1940 depended entirely on the US.  The American plans named “Orange” envisioned a trans-Pacific projection of US power, with Manila serving as a base of operations in the Far East.  But, by 1941, “Plan Dog” foresaw the Atlantic as the offensive and the Pacific in a defensive state.

Japan's Second Cabinet, early 1940

Japan’s Second Cabinet, early 1940

By 1941, the regular cabinet members of the Japanese gov’t were on a need-to-know basis and entire civilian cabinets were forced to resign as the war drew closer.  Japan’s signing of the Tripartite Pact on 27 September 1940 with Germany and Italy, [was to Japan], a trade agreement, plus a way to keep Russia busy and unable to hinder her while she invaded Indochina.  This was not the view of the West and caused further deterioration of Us/Japanese relations.

In his campaign for an unprecedented third term in office, FDR spouted in Boston, MA, “I give you one more assurance.  I have said it before, but I shall say it again and again and again:  Your boys are NOT going to be sent to any foreign war.”  (As we all know now – that was merely a hollow political promise.).

To be continued…..

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A View of the homefront – 1939 

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 Political Cartoon of the times - 

Neutrality%20Act

 

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Farewell Salutes - 

Robert “Eggs” Avington – St. Petersburg, FL; US Army (Ret.), Korea, Distinguished Service Cross, Purple Heart

Thomas Cushing – Hopkinton, NH; US Army, WWII, PTOimg_96953714425802

Marjorie Effinger – Atwater, CA; US Army, nurse, PTO

Thomas Groom – Christchurch, NZ; RNZ Army# 19274, WWII

Patrick Holland – Halifax, Can; RC Navy, RC Army, RC Air Force, Major (Ret. 42 years) 3rd Clasp to the Canadian Decoration

William McFatter – Vernon, FL; US Army, WWII, ETO, Purple Heart

Robert McCurley – Springfield, IL; US Army Air Corps, WWII, POW

Melvin Shubert – NY & Lake Worth, FL; US Navy, WWII, Medical Corps

Tedrowe Watkins – Big Fork, Montana; US Marine Corps, WWII

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Nakajima Ki-27 Ko: Celestial Elegance.

gpcox:

An added insight into the build up of events in the Pacific.

Originally posted on The Dreamy Dodo:

Nakajima Ki-27 Ko: Celestial Elegance.

If the Japanese fighters had a thing in spades that’s for sure was style and this Nakajima’s is not an exception.The Ki-27 was the first modern monoplane fighter to enter service in the Imperial Japanese Army AF in the late 30′s.
Blooded in combat by the very belligerent Japanese,this neat plane proved to be an efficient fighter,not very fast but with the well-loved Japanese taste for maneuverability.The Ki-27 remained in front line service long after the start of WW2.

Very pretty pic of one a 84th Dokuritsu Hiko-Chutai’s Ki-27 flying over Canton,1939.The image gives clear testimony of its pleasantly fluent lines.

Photo: Hiroshi Sekiguchi.

View original

East and West (1)

There are centuries of information on this subject, but I’ve done my best to shorten the data, and maintain  the gist of affairs as they occurred:

A lithograph of Cmdr. Perry's fleet in Japan

A lithograph of Cmdr. Perry’s fleet in Japan

Japan’s involvement with the West began early in the 16th century.  The Western missionaries and the contrasting firearms trading caused a disruption of the feudal lord system.  Later on, Dutch trading at Nagasaki became an avenue of scientific and political knowledge.  After which, the US naval mission and “Black Ships” of Commodore Matthew Perry in the mid-1800s basically forced Japan to open its doors.

Commodore Matthew Perry

Commodore Matthew Perry

By the end of the 19th century, the views of the Asian world by the Anglos were of “Manifest Destiny” (global supremacy).  The British Union Jack flew over nearly one-third of the planet and the US wanted in.  But, after teaching the island nation how to conquer territory, the West became annoyed that they had learned so well.  In 1922, the Naval Limitation Treaty forced the Imperial Navy to limit her battleship tonnage to a ration of 60% of the British Royal Navy and US Navy. (This was easy to control being as the Japanese ships were built in British shipyards.  But, in 1937, Japan resigned from this pact.)

Lt.Colonel Ishiwara Kanji

Lt.Colonel Ishiwara Kanji

In 1929, Lt.Col. Ishiwara Kanji drafted “A Plan for the Solution of the Manchurian and Mongolian Problems as a Basic Policy to Change Our Country’s Destiny.”  This work was a remarkably close scenario for the Pacific War and by the 1930′s, the Japanese had started the plan by taking control of what the citizens would and would not be told of their agenda.

The great game of “Empire” was on!  Not only did countries vie for a piece of China, but major corporations came into play – Standard Oil, House of Morgan, The Pennsylvania Railroad, Bethlehem Steel and the Roosevelt family fortune founded on the Opium Road. (20% of Great Britain’s income also came from the opium trade.)  While President Hoover was in office, he feared any actions against Japan would lead to war – such as Henry Stimson’s proposed oil and trade embargo.  To Hoover, this resembled “sticking pins in tigers.”  The president felt his Secretary of State was “proving to be more of a warrior than a diplomat.”

Japanese soldiers entering Shenyang, 1931

Japanese soldiers entering Shenyang, 1931

In the 1930′s, the Japanese government crushed freedom of expression, pacifism and anti-militarism.  Their intent was to keep the public ignorant, but even this was not enough.  In the schools, children were taught a willingness to die for the country in time of war, chukan aikoku, along with a contempt for the Chinese.

Japanese gym class, 1930

Japanese gym class, 1930

During the Russo-Japanese War, school subjects were planned with militarism in mind:  Math classes were occupied with calculations of military matters; Science was information on searchlights, wireless communications, land mines, torpedoes, submarines and explosives; Gym included war games and Music Classes rang out with war songs and pictures of Japanese victories inspired compositions.  A new order for East Asia needed to be instilled; what the Germans called - Lebensraum.

To be continued….

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Current news - 

Not all news is bad news_______

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Please click on to read.                                                                       Both items were taken from ‘The Week’ magazine

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Political Humor –  (Typical of the times)

From Dr. Seuss

From Dr. Seuss

Cartoon is courtesy of Chris @ Muscleheaded, which can be found HERE>

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Farewell Salutes - 

WWII Victory Medal

WWII Victory Medal

Louis Amundson – San Diego, CA; US Army, WWII (D-Day), ETO

Charles Corbitt -CA & FL; US Army Air Corps, WWII, navigator

Clarence Frye – Lake Worth, FL; US Army, WWII

John Hardwick – Hartford City, IL; US Army, Korea

Ralph Locher – Nashville, TN; US Army, Korea, 187th RCT, MP

Charles Pine – Taupo, NZ; RNZIR # U50940, WWII

Jack Stewart – Salem, OR; US Navy, WWII

Robert Wallace – Rosalia, WA; US Army, Korea, tank driver

Howard German Jr. – Easton, MD & N.Palm Bch, FL; US Army, 82nd Airborne

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OPEN LETTER TO: ALL

Courtesy of "The Voice of the Angels."

Courtesy of “The Voice of the Angels.”

 

As we venture back to the past for the Pacific War, there will continue to be eye-witness stories, the Farewell Salutes, occasionally a homeland episode and military humor.  I may not supply all the resources for my posts, since as many as 5 or 6 may be used to verify the information of any given post.  My bibliography has grown to 6 pages long and has not even been updated lately; also my own library has grown considerably since I first chronicled the war.

I will be re-blogging  some of my own posts from the Archives – updated since they were first published.  This entire site is dedicated to my father, Everett A. Smith, aka “Smitty”, who served in the Headquarters Company/187th Regiment/11th Airborne Division in the Pacific during WWII and the 11th A/B as a whole; therefore it is only right that I do so.  Smitty never said, “I did this” or “I did that,”  it was always – “The 11th did IT!”

Everett "Smitty" Smith at Camp MacKall, N.C.

Everett “Smitty” Smith at Camp MacKall, N.C.

As a member of the 11th Airborne Association (Member # 4511) myself, I am privy to their newsletter, “The Voice of the Angels,” edited by Matt & Kara Underwood, and I will be using quotes and stories from that publication.  Mr. Underwood and the officers of the Association have been of great assistance to me and I thank them very much for their help.

Please, DO continue to share what stories you know and/or a link to data you’ve uncovered and put them in the comments.  I am afraid no emails will be opened.  If you are not a blogger, you can Follow by clicking the Follow button in the top right-hand corner of each post.

I thank you all for your contributions in the past and hope you will continue to do so.  If you are new to this site – WELCOME!!  We have a wonderful group of people participating here – join them.  Reminder – we have the volunteers and veterans of the Little Rock, AR area watching us too – help show your support of our veterans .

Please remember that these countries, in the following posts, were in a horrendous war and NOTHING written or quoted here is with the intent to disparage any people or nations.  And, I have tried to limit the amount of gory details without shading the facts.  I hope I succeed.

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Military Humor - 

Some definitions you may want to keep in mind:

ARMY - a body of men assembled to rectify the mistakes of the diplomats
DRAFT BOARD - the world’s largest travel agency
MILITARY EXPERT - one who tells you what will happen next week – and then explains why it didn’t
NEW GUINEA SALUTE - waving the hand over the mess kit to ward off the flies
PACIFIST - a person who fights with everybody BUT the enemy
WAR - a time that starts off paying old scores and ends up by paying new debts
 
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Farewell Salutes - 

Brian Ashton – TePuke, NZ; NZ Reg. # 386718, Platoon B, Malayaus-flag-and-soldier-1

George Barton – Joliet, IL; US Air Force, WWII

Richard Crawford – Seattle, WA; US Navy (RET.), submarine service, Vietnam

Arthur Kitts – Singer Island, FL; US Army, WWII, antiaircraft battery

Hung O. Lee – College Point, NY; US Army Air Corps, WWII, 511th/11th A/B Div., PTO

Carmen Edward Mercandante -Amsterdam, NY; US Army, WWII, ETO

Reinhold “Hank” Nagel – Sun Lakes, AZ; US Army Air Corps, WWII, HQ Company/187th Reg./11th Airborne Div., PTO

Johnny Powell – Cartwright, OK; US Navy, WWII & US Air Force, Korea (Ret. 23 years)

Franklin Trapnell Jr. – Richmond, VA; US Army, Colonel (Ret. 34 years), 2 tours Vietnam

Thomas Weatherall – Toronto, Can; British Army, WWII

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07-04-14

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4th of July

fireworks4

 

SEEMS WE DON’T SAY IT ENOUGH – SO, I’M TRYING TO FIX THAT RIGHT HERE – GOD BLESS THE USA!!!

lib-bell

 

We can rant, we can complain and we can thank the troops for giving us the right to do so!  Today we celebrate our country’s birthday, traditional BBQ’s, fireworks, family and friends, we have a day off and have a ball!  - and to who do we owe it all?  You guessed it_____

 

God Bless Our Troops

God Bless Our Troops

 THE SOLDIER’S POEM

When this is over
And we come home again,
Forget the band
And cheers from the stand;
Just have the things
Well in hand -
The things we fought for.
UNDERSTAND?

_____Pfc C.G. Tiggas

Eagle_waving_Flag_and_Torch-150x161

ONLY A SAILOR4th-of-july-flag-fireworks-animated-gif-heart

He’s only a sailor on the boundless deep,
Under foreign skies and tropical heat.
Only a sailor on the rolling deep,
In summer rain and winter sleet.

____from Anna @ Maiden on the Midway

4th-of-July

The moving photographs are courtesy of Don Edrington and netanimations.net.

HappyBirthdayAmerica

SO - HAVE FUN, STAY SAFE and BE HAPPY !!

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Farewell Salutes - 

Alfred Bouchard – Manchester, NH; USMC, Master Gunnery SGT., Korea and Vietnam

Eugene Butkevich – Brooklyn, NY & W.PalmBch, FL; USMC, WWII and Korea

Arthur “Dick” Clark – Mount Vernon, IL; US Army, Korea

Albert John Edward – NZ; RNZ Army # 14148507, Lance Cpl, pilot

William Gentry – Washington DC; USMC (Ret.), Lt.ColonelEagle-Flag

Donald Haskell – Goffstown, NH; US Army, WWII, ETO, medic

Clifford Jones Jr. – Boynton Bch, FL; US Army, Korea

Carmen Edward Mercadante – Amsterdam, NY; US Army, WWII, ETO

Delton Pate – Antlers, OK; US Army Air Corps,127th Engineers, B Co., WWII, PTO

George Rankin – Wichita, KS & W.Palm Bch, FL; US Air Force, Captain, Vietnam

Clarence Wright – Clarksville, TN; US Air Force, MSgt., Korea

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Lest We Forget

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