Mulqueen’s Donated WWII Knife Makes it to War in the Pacific

gpcox:

A home front story that shows the American spirit of the Greatest Generation!!

Originally posted on The Hanneman Archive:

When the United States was drawn into World War II by the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the war effort was put forth by everyone from soldiers at the front to school children at home. Young Edward J. Mulqueen of Cudahy, Wisconsin, wanted to do his part, so he donated his prized hunting knife to the U.S. military.

An 11-year-old student at St. Frederick’s Catholic School, Mulqueen read about the shortages of materials for the war effort. Newspapers carried pleas for donation of quality knives, since the hardened steel used in the blades was scarce. Eddie didn’t hesitate. In late 1942, he carefully packaged up his knife and mailed it to the address published in the newspaper. He was proud to do his part. After all, with two brothers headed for the Pacific theater (and later a third) he had a personal stake in the fight.

He might have forgotten about…

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March 1942 (1)

Japanese in N.E.I.

Japanese in N.E.I.

The arrival of Japanese units on Java gave the enemy the important naval base at Surabaya and access to the valuable assets of oil, rubber, bauxite and rice.  This positioning would aid the operations targeting assaults on Australia.

HMAS Yarra

HMAS Yarra

2-4 March – The HMAS Yarra arrived at Tjilatjap with the depot ship Anking, the tanker Francol and the minesweeper MMS-51, the sloop was ordered to escort the other 3 ships to Freemantle.  A day later, the ship rescued forty survivors of the Dutch ship Paragi from their life rafts.  By the 4th, the convoy encountered an enemy fleet with the cruisers Atago, Takao and Maya and 4 destroyers.  Despite the gallant efforts of the Yarra, all 4 ships were pursued and sunk.  There were originally 34 survivors, but rescue did not arrive until the 9th and there were only 13 remaining.

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JapBikes

9 March – two days after the last Allied troops surrendered on Java, Emperor Hirohito warned Marquis Kido, Lord Privy Seal, “The fruits of victory are tumbling into our mouths too quickly.”  It was his 42nd birthday.  As the Japanese Empire grew in size each day, they were faced with the problems of defending and administering to their newly acquired territories.

By this time, Churchill made even more demands of the US for tanks, aircraft and troops to be shipped to Britain.  But, with the added concern of protecting Australia and New Zealand, FDR warned him that the original build-up plan must be cut for the emergency status in the Pacific.  This gave Admiral King the opportunity to try to push his “Pacific-First” campaign.

a 1942 sample of war news. Click on to read.

a 1942 sample of war news.
Click on to read.

The Director of War Plans, BGen. Eisenhower, insisted on (A) maintenance of the United Kingdom; (B) retention of Russia in the war; (C) maintenance of the Indian-Middle East area to prevent a junction of the Axis enemies. [C- was actually a misconception here as Japan felt no attachment to Germany other than one old trade agreement.  It was the Allied powers that created the "link" between the 2 nations.].  King continued to argue that the US priority was the Pacific, while Ike called him “an arbitrary and stubborn type with too much brain…”  Marshall put forward a compromise, which went into effect, favoring the Atlantic.

Japanese soldiers teach New Guinea villagers songs as part of their indoctrination.

Japanese soldiers teach New Guinea villagers songs as part of their indoctrination.

8-17 March – on New Guinea, Japanese forces invaded with 2 battalions at Lae and Salamaua in the Huon Gulf.  Two days later, the enemy started their air raids on Port Moresby as the Allies sent aircraft to strike the Japanese positions.  Enemy forces secured the northern coastline with a landing at Finschafen.  The US cruisers Enterprise & Lexington launched major air raids against enemy shipping and landing parties.  The US Navy reported 2 enemy heavy cruisers, 5 transport vessels, 1 light cruiser and possibly 3 destroyers sunk; 1 destroyer and 1 cruiser damaged.  Those included the Armed Merchant Cruiser Kongo Maru, aux. minelayer Tenyo Maru [that broke in 2 pieces before sinking] and the transport Yokohama Maru.  The USS Yorktown was credited with the destruction of seaplane tender Kiyokama Maru.

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MILITARY  HUMOR – Pin-ups became VERY popular - 

Vivian Austin

Vivian Austin

 

Ann Miller, Yank Magazine

Ann Miller, Yank Magazine

 

 

 

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BENEFITS FOR TODAY’S VETERANS – submitted by Sheri DeGrom, we both hope these links will assist any veteran!

www.va.gov

military advantage

VA Registry 

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Farewell Salutes - 

James Biden – El Paso, TX; US Army, Korea & Vietnam

Michael Davison – Vernon, CAN; RC Army, WWII, ETOBN91311

John Eldridge Jr. – Fairbanks, AK; US Army (Ret. 20 years), Vietnam, Bronze Star

Gordon Jones – NH, MA & FL; US Navy, USS Cecil J. Doyle, navigator

Peter Kassig – Indianapolis, IN; US Army, Ranger, Iraq

Kenneth Leisy – Sun Lakes, AZ; US Army Major (Ret.), WWII

John McEwing – Dargaville, NZ; RNZ Army #443847, WWII, Lance Cpl.

Terry Sato – Denver, CO; WWII internee

Paul Tidwell Jr. – Delray Bch, FL; US Air Force, Korea

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February 1942 (3)

 

 

Melbourne's "Argus" headlines, 24 Feb. '42

Melbourne’s “Argus” headlines, 24 Feb. ’42

 

In early 1942, Darwin, Australia was used as a military base, a transit area for men and aircraft heading out to their newly assigned areas.  The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) therefore had no fighters to ward off any possible enemy attack.  On 19 February, Darwin suffered its first and most devastating air raid.

 

a wrecked Lockheed Hudson

a wrecked Lockheed Hudson

 

The Japanese had assessed Darwin as a major threat to their operations on Timor and Java (Ambon had already been captured).  The 47 Allied Naval Merchant ships sitting in the harbor presented a desirable target, along with the township of military facilities.  Japanese aircraft carriers in the Arafura Sea were sent in for the first wave of attacks which lasted 42 minutes; catching American pilots on patrol by surprise and downing most of them.

 

ABDACOM-Area (1)

 

The Area Combined Headquarters in Darwin disregarded the warnings of a Catholic missionary on Bathurst Island and that of a naval coastwatcher on Melville Island as the enemy took off from Ambon.  This second wave arrived an hour later and  the strike was concentrated on the military airfield as their main objective.

In and around the harbour, ships, wharves and parts of the town suffered severe damage.  Three Allied naval ships and 5 merchant ships were sunk and another 10 were damaged.  Most of the 235-280 (references differ) people killed were victims of the first wave.  The second wave killed 6 RAAF servicemen and destroyed 9 planes on the ground.  Several of the civilians were killed in the township, especially when the Post Office and bomb shelter received a direct hit.  All together, approximately 260 enemy aircraft were used for these air raids.

 

debris in a bomb crater

debris in a bomb crater

 

This was the first of about 97 attacks Australia would receive from the Japanese; 63 of which would hit Darwin.  The final air raid would not be until November 1943.  The first two military medals for bravery on Australian soil were awarded to 2 antiaircraft gunners for their actions.  Other servicemen and civilians were commended for rescuing crewmen from the waters and burning ships; as doctors and nurses treated the victims.

The reason why the air raid sirens did not go off until just prior to attack and why message alerts were disregarded?  Perhaps some of the readers here can answer that in the comment section?

Lt. Walker's P40E Kittyhawk

Lt. Walker’s P40E Kittyhawk

Shortly after this attack, on 3 March 1942, Broome, Australia in the northern part of the country, received a devastating air raid without warning.  The Japanese aircraft swept in low over the township, bombing and strafing the harbour, airfield and town; dozens were killed or wounded and 24 aircraft were destroyed.  Many of the casualties were Dutch refugees from the Netherlands East Indies (aka Indonesia), whose flying boats were sitting in the harbour defenseless.

Click on images to enlarge.

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Humour – Australian style - 

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Farewell Salutes - 

Harold Baird – Godfrey, IL; US Army (9years), US Navy SeaBees  (Ret. 15 years)

Roy Baker – Oakville, CAN; RC Navy, WWII, HMCS Uganda

William Cooper – Melbourne, AUS; RA Navy, WWII, surgeon-lieutenantanzac

Frances George (nee Roberts) – Manaia, NZ; RNZWAAF # 2061889, WWII, CBI

Leo Mallard – So.Boston, MA; US Army & Navy, WWII

Andrew Ross – Redland City, AUS; RA Army, # 37872

Shirley Spanheimer – WPalm Bch, FL; US WAC, WWII, Sgt.

Lloyd Trotter – West. Australia; RA Air Force, WWII, pilot, POW

Ronald Walsh – Scarness, AUS; RA Army, WWII # Q130219

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Lend-Lease Memorial – Fairbanks, Alaska

gpcox:

ANOTHER WONDERFUL POST FROM DEANO!

Originally posted on Aces Flying High:

Industrial might lead to victory in WW2

Industrial might lead to victory in WW2

During the early years of World War Two in Europe, both Great Britain and Russia needed a vast amount of military equipment to combat Germany and other Allied nations needed help against Japan. These countries lost a lot of equipment in the early Axis onslaught and their need for replacements far surpassed their own production capability. Luckily the industrial might of the United States of America had the solution to this problem.

The Lend-Lease program proposed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in early 1941 (following requests from British Prime Minister Winston Churchill “Give us the tools and we will finish the job“) was enacted by the United States Congress on March 11th, 1941 to provide financial and military equipment aid to her allies (formally known as An Act to Further Promote the Defense of the United States). This was

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February 1942 (2)

Lt. Edward "Butch" O'Hare, Feb. 1942

Lt. Edward “Butch” O’Hare, Feb. 1942

 

20 February – Lieutenant Edward H. “Butch” O’Hare, of the US Navy became America’s first flying ace while piloting his Grumman F4F “Wildcat” off the USS Lexington.  Fellow blogger Maryann Holloway has a terrific post for Butch___

Rangoon area map, showing Sittang River

Rangoon area map, showing Sittang River

21 February – Allied resistance in Burma evaporated at the Sittang River.  At one point, the British forces that were crossing the river on a single bridge, were forced to blow it up with a large number of men stranded on the other side.  Many of these soldiers drowned when they attempted to swim across.  The Japanese were then free to turn west toward Rangoon, but they would discover that the British had destroyed anything that might be of value to the enemy before they evacuated.

23 February – The Japanese submarine 1-17 made a rare attack on the west coast of the United States.  The oil refinery at Ellwood, California was fired on 17 times, but this only caused minor damage to a pier and an oil well derrick.

Japanese troops in Java

Japanese troops in Java

On the evening of 27 February, the Japanese Eastern Force of 4 cruisers, 14 destroyers and 41 transport vessels sailing for Java were intercepted by US, Dutch< Australian and British warships.  The Allied force consisted of 5 cruisers and 9 destroyers under Dutch Adm.Karel Doorman.  They suffered from inferior firepower, no reconnaissance aircraft, (Doorman felt they should remain ashore), no air cover and the admiral’s lack of experience.  Two Allied cruisers were sunk.  The HMS Exeter withdrew due to damage in her engine room and Ad. Doorman was killed.  Only one enemy destroyer was damaged.

USS Pope

USS Pope

The following night, the 2 remaining cruisers, USS Houston and the HMAS Perth, engaged the enemy west of Batavia, sinking 2 ships and damaging 4 other vessels.  The cruisers were later destroyed by 12 Japanese warships.  The HMS Exeter and 2 destroyers escorting her were sunk as they attempted to escape to Ceylon.  Three of the enemy warships involved in this battle were the Jintsu, Nachi and the Haguro.

Japanese aerial view of the Exeter

Japanese aerial view of the Exeter

The only Allied survivors of the Battle of the Java Sea were 4 US destroyers.  This action showed the perils of a makeshift multinational task force and demonstrated the superiority of certain Japanese weapon types; especially their “Long Lance” torpedoes.  (The wreckage of the Houston was finally confirmed as being located.  This was mentioned in my post “News Day.” which can be located HERE!

Japanese Long Lance torpedo being fired

Japanese Long Lance torpedo being fired

Churchill, upon hearing of the state of affairs of the ground troops on Java, sent a farewell message to the British that remained with the Dutch and Australian units: “I know you will do everything humanly possible to prolong the battle.”

Adm. Conrad Helfrich, Commander of the ABDA, was told the joint venture was dissolved.  Six days later, the last radio station in operation told the ground troops: “We are shutting down…Goodbye till better times.  Long live the Queen!”

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MILITARY HUMOR - 

Camp Polk

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FAREWELL SALUTES - 

Florence Anderegg – Anchorage, ALaska; US Army WAC, WWII, nurse

Charles Cornwell – Harlington, TX; US Army, Vietnam945925_391409037634955_1621483807_n

Arthur Cowan – Otorohanga, NZ; RNZ Army # 20161, WWII, Sgt.

Richard Fereshetian – Carlisle, MA; US Navy, WWII

Joseph Geoghan Jr. – No.Augusta, SC; US Army, Korea & Vietnam, Sgt. (Ret. 21 years)

Larry Michael – Vinton, IA; USMC, Vietnam, Major (Ret. 22 years)

Reginal Shikami – Chicago, IL; Manzanar Camp internee & US Army Intelligence Service

John Taylor – Vancouver, CAN; RC Air Force, WWII, Flying Beaufighters & the Buffalo 404 Sq.

Robert Whelpley – McPherson, KS; US Navy, WWII, PTO

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Veteran’s Day

Always a Soldier!!

Always a Soldier!!

 

“FOR TOO LONG, TOO MANY OF US HAVE PAID SCANT ATTENTION TO THE SACRIFICE OF A BRAVE FEW IN OUR MIDST.  IT IS UNHEALTHY FOR A NATION TO BECOME DETACHED FROM THOSE WHO SECURE IT.”_______Howard Schultz, author of For Love of Country

 

veterans-day-image

 

I first want to give my personal THANK YOU to each and every veteran that fights for peace and freedom!!!  I tear up and become speechless at the mere sight of any one of you!!  Boo-ya!!  Here in the United States of America we do our best to convey our gratitude to these men and women for giving so much of themselves for our safety on this day.  In such nations as: Canada, New Zealand, Australia, England, India, Mauritius, South Africa and many in Europe, a day set aside is called Remembrance Day and was recently observed.

countvet

Our fellow blogger @ Parent Rap led me to this –  100 Ways to Honor a Veteran – if you care to view it – CLICK HERE.

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FREEDOM IS NOT FREE

by: Cadet Major Kelly Strong, Air Force Junior ROTC, Homestead Senior High, Homestead, FL 1988

watched the flag pass by one day,
It fluttered in the breeze.
A young Marine saluted it, and then
He stood at ease.
 
looked at him in uniform
So young, so tall, so proud,
With hair cut square and eyes alert,
He’d stand out in any crowd.
 
thought how many men like him
Had fallen through the years.
How many died on foreign soil?
How many mother’s tears?
 
How many pilot’s planes shot down?
How many died at sea?
How many foxholes were soldier’s graves?
No, freedom is not free.
 
I heard the sound of Taps one night,
When everything was still.
I listened to the bugler play
And felt a certain chill.
 
I wondered how many times
that Taps meant “Amen,”
When a flag draped a coffin
Of a brother or a friend.
 
I thought of all the children,
Of the mothers and the wives,
Of fathers, sons and husbands
With interrupted lives.
 
I thought about a graveyard
At the bottom of the sea
O unmarked graves in Arlington
No, freedom is not free.
 
veterans_day

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MILITARY HUMOR  - 

Soldiers Never Change!

Soldiers Never Change!

Our budget-cut Air Force?

Our budget-cut Air Force?

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CURRENT NEWS -

The true story of WWII hero, POW, and Olympic athlete, Louis Zamperini who recently passed away 2 July 2014, has his life depicted in Laura Hillenbrand’s best seller, Unbroken, will be coming to the big screen, 25 December.

Did you know? – One of most inspiring anthems, God Bless America, sort of has a birthday – Irving Berlin wrote an earlier version in 1918, but the one we hear today was first performed on 11 November 1938, in a radio broadcast by Kate Smith.  The song eventually became her theme song.

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Farewell Salutes - 

Harold A. Blake Jr. – Fulton, NY; US Army, 11th Armored Div., WWII, ETO, Battle of the Bulge

Margaret Yang Kim – Oahu, HI, WAC, WWII

Gordon Lewis – Waterbury, CT; USMC, WWII, PTO, First Lt., pilot, MIA

Samuel Melish – Cincinnati, OH; USMC, WWII, PTO, Cpl, gunner, MIApatriotic1

Gilford Muncy – Hyden, KY; US Army, WWII, ETO

Marcus H. Muncy – Hyden, KY; USMC, WWII, Cpl, PTO

Harry Phillips – Sunderland, UK; Merchant Marine, WWII, SS Empire Webster, Lloyds War Bravery Medal

Everett A. Smith – Broad Channel, NY; US Army, 11th A/B Div., WWII, Cpl.

George Zimmerman – Tampa, FL; US Army, WWII, PTO

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NOTE _  All the Farewell Salutes today are friend or relatives of our fellow bloggers.

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239th U.S. Marine Corps Birthday

Marine motto

 

What does the celebration mean to Marines across the globe?  To General John Lejeune it meant a great deal.  On 1 November 1921, he issued Marine Corps Order No. 47, Series 1921, which provided a summary of the history, mission and traditions of the Corps and directed that the order be read to every command each subsequent year on 10 November.

To see 29 facts you may not know about Marines – check out the USO blog HERE!!!

U-S--Marine-Corps-Celebrates-234th-Birthday---22429167

At the Marine Corps Ball, one key piece of the ceremony is to present the first piece of cake to the oldest Marine in the room, who in turn gives the next to the junior Marine.  This symbolic gesture is the passing of experience and knowledge from the veteran to the recruit.  We should all emulate their example and take part in history.

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To all those who are able – Enjoy the fruits of your labor and revel in the spectacle and unabashed camaraderie that is the U.S. Marine Corps!!

 

Gen. Joseph F. Dunford, Jr. (R) w/ Capt. Greg Youngberg, of Boynton Bch, FL; Aviator of the Year for USMC

Gen. Joseph F. Dunford, Jr. (R) w/ Capt. Greg Youngberg, of Boynton Bch, FL; Aviator of the Year for USMC

2014 Message from the Commandant of the Marine Corps

2014 Message from the Commandant of the Marine Corps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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marine_woman

US Marine Corps [USMC] [Emblem][1_5]

 

 

 

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USMC  HUMOR -

3a2805da994e89dd72c074778d07289bDare

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Somebody catch that guy and give him a piece of cake!!

Somebody catch that guy and give him a piece of cake!!

 

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FAREWELL SALUTES - 

John Ault – Winthrop, ME; USMC, WWII, USS San Jacintowpid-f3eab693b4ebd9ede79db7547238b0ad

John Baird – Des Moines, IA; USMC, MSgt. (Ret. 22 years), Korea & 2 tours Vietnam

Theodore DiMaria – Kingston, MA; USMC, WWII, PTO

Edwin Hyjek – Manchester, CT; USMC, WWII

James J. O’Leary – Mission Viejo, CA; USMC, MGSgt, WWII,Korea & Vietnam

Maria Richard – Metairie, LA; USMC, Gunnery Sgt. (Ret. 24 years), Purple Heart

Edward Rogers – Long Island, NY & Palm Bch, FL; USMC, WWII, Purple Heart

Edward “Lipps” Ross, Sr. – Baltimore, MD; USMC, SSgt., Vietnam

Michael Sadlo – Pompano Beach, FL; USMC, Pfc

Edna Smith – Las Vegas, NV; Civilian employee, USMC Air Station, El Toro, Korea

Jared Spickelmier – Boise, ID; USMC, Sgt, Iraq, helicopter crew chief

Christopher Wren Jr. – Kennesaw, GA; USMC, First Lt., Korea

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Sands of Manzanar

gpcox:

PLEASE GIVE A WARM WELCOME TO A FRIEND OF MINE, KOJI. HIS FAMILY ENDURED THE INJUSTICE THAT EXISTED ON THE HOME FRONT during WWII.

 

Originally posted on Masako and Spam Musubi:

Image

It wasn’t the deadly black sand that greeted the US Marines on Iwo Jima.

But as we stood on out on the desert, white powdery dust would swirl up in the softly blowing arid wind…  and I then realized it was upon this gawd-awful sand that my Aunt Shiz and Uncle John built their future for their family.

It was their Iwo Jima…  It was called the “Manzanar War Relocation Center” by our government back during World War II.

They were forced onto these forsaken sands by FDR in April of 1942 but made the most of it.  Quietly.  仕方が無い…  我慢.  Shikataganai and gaman.

A

FDR called it relocation centers.

It’s just my opinion but political correctness be damned.

It was a prison.  Complete with eight guard towers and soldiers manning .30 caliber Browning machine guns.  Barbed wire fencing all around.  No freedoms.  Chow at specific times.  Public toilets and…

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19 February 1942 (2)

Camp Swift, Texas

Camp Swift, Texas

 

Regardless of what two resources I happened to look into saying that only the Japanese were relocated, German and Italian immigrants and visitors alike were interned during WWII.  Also, under the pressure of the American government, Latin-American countries arrested more than 4,000 German-Latin Americans.  Most of these people were sent north to the US camps and at least that number of internees were were later exchanged for Americans being held on German soil.

German-Italian Detention Centers

German-Italian Detention Centers

 

Both of these groups were not detained to the extent of the Japanese.  There were far too many, numbers that went into the millions.  Rather, they were arrested individually and sent to the camps seen in the map above.  The German total was approximately 11,000 and the Italian sources stated 1,521 to 3,000.

Secretary of War, Stimson said the Italians were “potentially less dangerous as a whole than those of other enemy nationalities…the siege of Italian population and the number of troops and facilities which would have to be employed to deal with them; their inclusion in the general plan would greatly overtax our strength.”  Later, in November 1942, it was announced that the Italians were “no longer considered aliens of enemy nationality.”

Forrest, TN

Forrest, TN

The House Select Committee investigating the evacuation came to similar conclusions.  At the bottom of a full text of lengthy hearings regarding the German and Italian situation, the passage reads___”From the reasons mentioned above…Indeed, this committee is prepared to say that any such proposal is out of the question if we intend to win this war.”

Crystal City, Volunteer Fire Dept. & sketch of cottage homes

Crystal City, Volunteer Fire Dept. & sketch of cottage homes

General Drum, leading the Eastern Defense Command, stated…”Mass evacuation is not contemplated.”  But, General DeWitt, of the Western Defense Command, called mass evacuation___”a military necessity” and “definite instructions to the contrary would exempt him from all responsibility for the consequences.”

Click on images to enlarge.

A fellow blogger, James Rada, Jr. has a very interesting article on German POWs who worked in Gettysburg, PA during the war, which can be located HERE!

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In Canada, the Minister of Justice could detain anyone acting “in any manner prejudicial to the pubic safety of the state.”  Therefore, both enemy and japannot.gifCanadianCanadian citizens were subject to internment.  Around 40 camps held an estimated 30,000 to 35,000 prisoners at various times.

Most of the German internees were members of German-sponsored organizations or leaders of the Nazi Party in Canada.  Hundreds of Germans on Canadian soil were accused of spying and subversion.  The camps also served to house captured enemy soldiers, such as over 700 German sailors captured in East Asia and sent to Canada.

After Italy entered the war, a number of prominent Italians and Canadian fascists, notably Adrien Arcand of Montréal, were interned.  About 600 Italian men suspected of sympathizing with fascism were placed into 3 camps: Kananaskis, Alberta, Petawawa, Ontario and Fredericton, New Brunswick.  This last camp also held 517 Jews sent from England by Winston Churchill, who suspected them of being disloyal.

Approximately 20,000 Japanese-Canadians were removed from the Pacific Coast in 1942.  Many were housed in isolated areas and had their activities severely restricted.  The Army and Secretary of State shared administrative responsibility for the camps.

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The information on Australia and New Zealand was supplied in the previous post, in the comment section, by Norma @ Thru My Eyes and Gallivanta @ Silk Ann Threades.   Please show them your support for their efforts.

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HUMOR of TODAY ______

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FAREWELL SALUTES - 

Allan Arnold – Wayland, MA; US Army, Vietnam

Marine Bugler

Marine Bugler

Gerald Boissonneault – Quebec, CAN; RC Navy, WWII

Patricia Boyd – Medical Lake, WA; US Air Force, Desert Storm (Ret. 21 years)

Frederic Edouard de Bray III – Atlanta, GA; US Army, Korea, 1st Lt.

Ron Forsyth – CAN; RC Air Force, WWII, 403rd Squadron, ETO, Flt. Lt.

Desmond Howitt – North Cote, NZ; NZ # 61034, 2NZEF, 14LTAA Gunner, WWII

Frank Manigault – Charleston, SC; US Army & US Navy

Hilary “Larry” Olmscheid – Providence, OR; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 11th A/B Div.

Red Ryder – Toronto, CAN; RC Air Force, WWII, ETO, 403rd Squadron, pilot

Donald Stonert – Ft. Wayne, IN; US Army, WWII

George Taylor – Lufkin, TX; US Army, WWII

Donald Wolsfelt – Montgomery, IL; US Army, Korea

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19 February 1942 (1)

 

suitcase now at the Smithsonian Museum

suitcase now at the Smithsonian Museum

As the greater Southeast Asia Co-Prosperity grew in dramatically record time and the typhoon of conquest spread outward into the Pacific, an air of defeat floated over Washington and London.  Out of fear, racism, political and commercial desires, President Franklin D. Roosevelt declared the infamous Executive Order 9066 on this date – 19 February 1942.  The U.S. Secretary of War was given the power to remove any persons of suspicion away from the west coast and herded into camps that were immediately put into construction.

 

Japanese-American Internment Camps

Japanese-American Internment Camps

 

There are many efforts being made to preserve survivors’ stories.  As the reader can see by the map, the amount of camps used to house the Japanese-Americans.  Seattle has the Densho Organization which holds over 600 histories can be located HERE!   The Japanese-American National Museum in the “Little Tokyo” area of Los Angeles, CA, now has over 300 memoirs and can be seen HERE.   The Remembrance Project does collect photos and stories on a web site, but this usually costs about $90 to download on.

Poston War Relocation Center - Arizona

Poston War Relocation Center – Arizona

The Nebraska Studies Organization contains information on what transpired in that state during this period.  They not only mention the camps, but they discuss the college situation at the time for the Nisei, their treatment in civilian life and the heroes who served.  They can be located HERE!.    [Once you enter the site, click on the box War Stories.]

Locally, I am privileged to live near the Morikami Museum.  Although there were no camps here in Florida, George Morikami, immigrants and Nisei were carefully monitored and required to receive written permission from the District Attorney before traveling outside the area.  The Yamato Colony here in So. Fla. will be featured more in depth in a post for a later date.  They have a WordPress site that can be found HERE.

Cody, Wyoming

Cody, Wyoming

The Japanese- American internment is one of the most embarrassing blots in US history.  It more or less followed in the footsteps of the Native American.  Congressman Robert Matsui has an interview online about the file the government has on him, although he was an infant at the camps.  He talks about his treatment after the war and how his parents refused to speak of it, even to him.

Rarely do you hear about Hawaii.  Shortly after the harbor was attacked, authorities arrested several hundred local Japanese on O’ahu, Maui, Hawai’i Island and Kaua’i.  Within hours, Buddhist priests, Japanese language school officials, newspaper editors, business and community leaders totaled over 2,000.  They, just as the mainland, were arrested, detained and interned – no charges ever being filed. To locate the Pacific parks click HERE.

Arkansas

Arkansas

George Takei, author and actor, has written his autobiography in “To The Stars” which includes his memories of the camp, and took part in the dedication ceremonies at the Japanese-American WWII Museum in McGenee, Arkansas.  Mr. Takei also participates with the Los Angeles museum.

Various sources I visited have listed the total number of Japanese and Japanese-American internees from 110,000 to 127,000 people.

 

 

 

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PLEASE NOTE THE VIDEO BELOW IN THE COMMENTS, KINDLY SENT FROM NORMA, ABOUT THE SIMILAR SITUATION IN AUSTRALIA.  ANN (GALLIVANTA) PUT IN A LINK FROM NEW ZEALAND FOR US.

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HuMoR - 

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flag04Let’s NOT forget that November is officially MILITARY FAMILY MONTH !!!!

 

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Farewell Salutes - 

Joseph Brodie – Taranaki, NZ; RNZ Army # 120580, WWII

Donald Cook – Boynton Bch., FL; US Navy, Vietnam (3 tours), Cuban Missile Crisismilitary

Thomas Hoke – Springfield, MO; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO

Richard Meraz (aka Four Winds) – San Gabriel, CA; USMC

Lloyd Oczkewicz – Everett, WA; US Army, WWII, ETO, Silver Star, Bronze Star

Lawrence Stankiewicz – Wichita, KS; US Air Force, MSgt., Vietnam

George Urban – Lake Worth, FL; US Army, WWII

John Vascovitch, Sr. – Brockton, MA; USMC, WWII, PTO

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