February 1942 (1)

(top) Navy plane over Wotjie Atoll, smoke is from fuel & ammo dump eruption.  (bottom) 2 US vessels during battle

(top) Navy plane over Wotjie Atoll, smoke is from fuel & ammo dump eruption. (bottom) 2 US vessels during battle

 

1 February – Adm. Halsey sent aircraft from the Enterprise and Yorktown to strafe and bomb Kwajalein and 5 other sites during the Marshall-Gilbert raids.  A fleet that also included the Salt Lake City and Northhampton.  Enemy transports were sunk or damaged and the Japanese commanding admiral was killed, at the cost of 13 planes.  The enemy retaliated and hit the Enterprise.  The US exaggerated the success of this battles by using headlines that read, “Pearl Harbor Avenged.”

Further information on this___Link Here.

In the Java/Sumatra area, allied naval forces were small compared tho the enemy fleet.  After a confrontation occurred between the two sides, the USS Marblehead found it necessary to go to Ceylon for repairs and the Houston‘s rear turret was out of commission.  Australian and Dutch troops on Sumatra were driven south.  The following day, the Dutch naval base at Surabya, on Java, was heavily damaged by an enemy air attack.

Port facilities at Oosthaven, Sumatra destroyed.

Port facilities at Oosthaven, Sumatra destroyed.

4 February – in the Madura Strait, Netherlands RAdm. Doorman suffered a massive air attack as his allied naval forces attempted to intercept a Japanese invasion fleet off Borneo.  One Dutch cruiser and 2 US cruisers were damaged.  10-20 February – the Japanese made paratrooper drops on Sumatra as Borneo and Celebes went under the enemy’s control.  The Japanese then followed up with jumps on Kupang, Timor.  Dutch and US ships engaged the enemy’s navy in the Badeong Strait (east of Bali).  One Japanese destroyer was damaged and the Dutch lost 2 vessels.

Japanese at Singapore

Japanese at Singapore

Gen. Percival had made the error of concentrating his force of the 18th British Division on the coastline of Singapore and the 22nd Australian Brigade in the dense mangrove swamps.  On 7 February – Gen. Yamashita sent the Konoye Division across the strait, headed directly to those swamps.  By dawn of the following day, 30,000 enemy troops were ashore attacking in bayonet charges during the pouring rain and pushed the Allies into retreat.  The 27th Brigade, in the central area were left defending their front.  13 February – almost all of the ships carrying evacuees fell prey to the enemy bombers and vessels; the Japanese picked up some of the survivors.

The ABDACOM area of responsibility

The ABDACOM area of responsibility

Despite Churchill’s insistence that Singapore could hold out for 6 months, the ‘City of Lions’ fell.  15 February – at 1800 hours, Percival and his officers emerged from his headquarters in front of Japanese reporters and newsreel cameramen to record a stage-managed surrender to Yamashita.  The battles had cost both sides about 10,000 men.  European women and children were then incarcerated in Changi camp and thousands of Chinese civilians were executed.  On the Japanese home front, the government decreed 2 bottles of beer or sake per family and a bag of candy for the children in celebration.

The staged Singapore surrender.

The staged Singapore surrender.

Sir Max Hastings, British journalist, historian and author, has said, “At Singapore the Japanese had a brilliant general and a terrific army up against one of the most incompetent range of commanders that the British army has ever put in the field.”  Hastings believes that the “British forces in Singapore was not unique in the context of the Second War War…the British convinced themselves that if the other side had air superiority, then the British were entitled to expect to lose the ground battle….The British Army was just not very good.”

The Japanese continued to advance to Burma and the Allied ABDA Air Command was down to 55 fighters.  Gen. Wavell sent a cable out: “Loss of Java, though a severe blow…would not be fatal.  Efforts should NOT therefore be made to reinforce Java which might compromise Burma and Australia.”  Prime Minister Curtin recalled his 1st Australian Division from sailing across the Indian Ocean.  But, Churchill interceded and redirected the division to Rangoon, telling Curtin, “…your greatest support in this our of peril must be drawn from the U.S.” (Once again, Australia had lost a method of self-defense).

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Humor –  Aussie and British style today….

Tank crew poster at Aberdeen training grounds.

Tank crew poster at Aberdeen training grounds.

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Owen Boyd – Lynnwood, WA; US Army, Korea

Tom Chappell – Born in England, Belle Glade, FL; RAF & RCAF, WWII, instructor at Clewiston, FL pilot & Bombardier school

Keith Dawson – Manurewa, NZ; RNZ Army # 815463 / RNZ Air Force # 44883, WWIIlib-bell

William Howell – South Jordan, UT; US Army, Korea, 4th Signal Battalion

Obrad Marinkovich – San Antonio, TX; US Air Force, fighter pilot (Ret. 30 years)

Bernard Murphy, FL; US Army, MSgt (Ret. 22 years), Korea & Vietnam

John O’Kane – Waltham, MA; US Army, WWII, ETOGeorge Scherr – Washington, IL; US Army, Korea, Engineers

Henry Turner – Canton, GA; US Army, WWII mortar crew, Korea & Vietnam

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A bucket of shrimp

gpcox:

A WELL-WRITTEN, HEARTWARMING STORY OF A HERO’S GRATITUDE____

Originally posted on Fix Bayonets:

They say old folks do strange things. At least, I think that is what young people say about us when they talk about us at all —which isn’t all that often. I think this is because we old folks are a bother. I think this must explain why younger people want to place us in nursing homes.

In any case, this story unfolded every Friday evening, almost without fail, when the sun resembled a giant orange and was starting to dip into the wide blue ocean.

Seagull Feeding 001Old Ed came strolling along the beach to his favorite pier. Clutched in his bony hand was a bucket of shrimp. Ed walks out to the end of the pier, where it seems he almost has the world to himself. The glow of the sun is a golden bronze now. Everybody has gone, except for a few joggers on the beach. Standing out on…

View original 764 more words

Cuban Missile Crisis

Missile launch sites in Cuba

Missile launch sites in Cuba

 

16 October is the 52nd anniversary of the start of the Cuban Missile Crisis.  For 13 days –  I felt I was holding my breath.  My uncle, MSgt. James O’Leary, already stationed on Cuba was flown back to the island from his leave; my cousin, Arthur Mulroy set sail from Norfolk, VA; and my aunt, Mabel O’Leary, a civilian employee of the Marines, were at stake here.

missiles involved

missiles involved

EVENTS -

- A U-2 spy-plane took pictures of missile bases in Cuba – Pres. Kennedy is notified that within 10 days, they will be operational.
- Kennedy set up a Committee of the National Security Council to advise him.  Their options: (1) Nuclear Strike? would probably cause a nuclear war; (2) Conventional Attack? Would probably cause war with Russia; (3) Use the UN? Too slow; (4) The bases were too close to ignore; (5) Blockade? might halt the missiles and was not a direct act of war.
- Blockade was announced.
- Khrushchev said missiles were solely for defense. (20 Russian ships were en-route to Cuba), accuses the US of piracy.
- Kennedy started planning a military attack on Cuba.
- Khrushchev’s telegram offers to dismantle bases if US will lift the blockade and promise not to invade the island.  A letter follows demanding Kennedy dismantle US missile bases in Turkey.  The same day, a U-@ plane was shot down over Cuba.
- Publicly – Kennedy agreed to lift the blockade and not invade Cuba.  Privately – Kennedy, in a secret phone call, told Russia the Turkey bases would be dismantled.  The president ignored the plane incident.
- Khrushchev agreed to the conditions and everybody went home.
US Navy P-24 Neptune of VP-18 over Russian ship w/ II-28s crated on deck

US Navy P-24 Neptune of VP-18 over Russian ship w/ II-28s crated on deck

 
RESULTS – 
 
- Khrushchev lost prestige and China broke from Russia.
- Kennedy was seen as the man who faced down the Russians.
- Both sides were hereafter more careful in their actions and the “hotline” phone system was set up.
- In 1963, the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty was signed.

 

For a list of ships and units credited with participation in this incident – CLICK HERE!

I wasn't the only person holding their breath!

I wasn’t the only person holding their breath!

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Current WWII news – 

Capt. David McCampbell

Capt. David McCampbell

Capt. David McCampbell, WWII

Capt. David McCampbell, WWII

 
  WWII pilot, Captain David McCampbell downed 34 Japanese warplanes in 6½ months and received a Medal of Honor for his actions.    McCampbell flew with Fighting Squadron 4 off the USS Wasp until she was sunk and then led the VF-15 off the USS Essex.  Tuesday, in a ceremony at Palm Beach International Airport, a bust of the pilot donated by the Kiwanis Club was unveiled.  Locally, we were able to watch the emotional ceremony on the 12pm news live.  The sculpture will remain on display at the east end of the 3rd floor of the airport.  Capt. McCampbell passed away in Riviera Beach, Florida in 1996.
 
For his complete story – Click HERE!

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Military Humor – 

Military protocol

Military protocol

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Farewell Salutes – 

John Crispell – Williamsburg, VA; US Army, WWII, Vietnam, Bronze Star

Thomas Hammel – Natick, MA – US Army, Cpl., WWII, ETO, 87th Mortar Battalion

Marie Kwasigroch – Wisconsin Rapids, WI; USWMC, WWIIhonor (1)

Robert McNamara – Palm Coast, FL; US Army, Korea

James Murray – Born: Scotland, Andrewsville, CAN; British Army, Capt., No. Africa & ETO

Maurice Provaznik – Minden, LA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, 187th Reg/11th A/B Div.

Douglas Rayburn – Taupo, NZ; RNZ Navy  # 11326

John Rowe – Royal Palm Bch, FL; US Navy, Cmdr. (Ret.), Korea

Raymond Vance – Huntsville, AL; US Army Air Corps, WWII 503rd Regiment

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US Navy Birthday

USNAVYImage4

The US Navy traces its origins to the Continental Navy, which the Continental Congress established on 13 October 1775, by authorizing procurement, fitting out, manning and dispatch of two armed vessels to cruise in search of munitions ships supplying the British Army in America.  The legislation also established a Naval Committee to supervise the work.  All together, the Continental Navy numbered some 50 ships over the course of the war, with approximately 20 warships active at its maximum strength.

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cpohires

In 1972, Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral Elmo R. Zumwait, authorized recognition of 13 October as the Navy’s birthday.  Not to be confused with Navy Day (the founding of the Navy Department), the Navy Birthday is intended as an internal activity for members of the active forces and reserves, as well as retirees and dependents.  Since 1972, each CNO has encouraged a Navy-wide celebration of this occasion “to enhance a greater appreciation of our Navy heritage and to provide a positive influence toward pride and professionalism in the naval service.”

Although written by a Royal Navy Admiral in 1896, “The Laws of the Navy” began to appear in the US Naval Academy’s “Reef Points” Plebe Handbook and is still there today.  The sketches were added by Lt. Rowland Langmaid R.N. during WWI.

Beginning of "The Laws of the Navy"

Beginning of “The Laws of the Navy”

Part 2

Part 2

Part 3

Part 3

End of "The Laws of the Navy"

End of “The Laws of the Navy

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HUMOR – 

FC

HAVE A BALL - BUT DON'T ROCK THE BOAT!!

HAVE A BALL – BUT DON’T ROCK THE BOAT!!

Lady Popeye

Lady Popeye

for you submariners

for you submariners

for you surface-vessel types...

for you surface-vessel types.

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Naval mystery – 

mysterious-plaque-by-midway-museum-commemorates-navys-200-year-anniversary

Fellow blogger  Cool San Diego Sights has been trying to locate the story behind a naval plaque embedded in a boulder.  The badly-corroded-mystery-plaque-shows-tallship-ironclad-early-warship-aircraft-carrier-and-jetsmonument was originally located at Broadway Pier, but was later moved near the USS Midway.  To read what information he discovered and/or add to the story___Please Click Here!

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FAREWELL SALUTES – 

Gene Acton = Wichita, KS; US Navy & civilian service w/ Boeing Aircraft

Wade “Buddy” Fitzek – Dunns Corners, RI; US Navy, WWII, USS Idaho

John Kohler – Hot Springs, AK; US Navy (Ret.), pilot systems, Vietnam, USS Kitty Hawk120507-M-0000C-005

Louis Marks – Arnaudville, LA; US Navy, Korea

Frank O’Malley – Ipswich, MA & Sarasota, FL; US Navy, WWII, Korea, pilot, USS Wasp & Midway

Edward Ouellet – Wellesley, MA; US Nay, WWII, PTO

John Overlease – Loveland, CO; US Navy, WWII, PTO

Marvin Sorensen – Race, WI; US Navy, Korea, USS Hawkins & Markab

Leo Speirs – Glines, UT; US Navy, WWII

Willis Wolfe – Oxnard, CA; US Navy, WWII, PTO, USS Waldron, recalled for Korea

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Ink for Ammunition

gpcox:

HERE IS A POSITION OF THE ARMY NOT OFTEN THOUGHT ABOUT.
ENJOY!

Originally posted on echoesofawar:

Mr. Hook

Mr. Hook

In 1942, Henry K. Ketcham was sworn into the Naval Reserve. Henry was from Washington State, where he had dropped out of college in his freshman year.  He had hitchhiked to Los Angeles, California in 1938 where he lived until he joined The Navy.

Navy poster with artwork by Henry Ketcham

Navy poster with artwork by Henry Ketcham

Mr. Hook eyes his target after coming home rich on war bonds

Mr. Hook eyes his target after coming home rich from investing in war bonds

The War brought thousands of men like Henry together; Americans who were ready to serve their country in its time of need. Henry was going to fight the Japanese and his weapon would be his pen.
Henry was an animator. He had worked on Woody Woodpecker films until he made it to the big show at Disney, working on films like Bambi, Pinocchio and Fantasia. Studios such as Disney and Warner Brothers threw themselves into supporting the war effort by designing insignias and creating…

View original 389 more words

January 1942 (2)

Top - blazing hangers at the airfield at Salamaua Bottom - Balikpapan oil wells set aflame by Dutch forces.

Top – blazing hangers at the airfield at Salamaua
Bottom – Balikpapan oil wells set aflame by Dutch forces.

6 January, the USS Yorktown, under RAdmiral Frank Fletcher, left San Diego, CA.  This was the flagship of the new Task Force 17 (TF-17) traveling with the supported protection of the Enterprise, flagship of TF-8.  Her mission was to unload a force of US Marines at Pago Pago to defend Samoa.  The two naval forces would then part company: TF-17 to the Marshalls and TF-8 to the Gilbert Islands.

USS Yorktown CV-5, North Island, San Diego, CA, WWII

USS Yorktown CV-5, North Island, San Diego, CA, WWII

7 January, Gen. Wavell made inspections of Singapore and reported back to Churchill that the “Fortress” defenses were far from adequate.  The entire north side was open to attack and all of the great guns faced the sea and could not be turned around.  Churchill responded that he was stunned, but his cable read: “NO SURRENDER MUST BE CONTEMPLATED.”

Retreat to Singapore by date.

Retreat to Singapore by date.

10-31 January, major Japanese landings occured throughout the Dutch East Indies.  Off the coast, on the 24th, US destroyers and Dutch bombers attacked an enemy convoy carrying additional troops.  Four ships were sunk, but the enemy managed to achieve a complete naval encirclement.

15-20 January, the Japanese 15th Army advanced into Burma and destroyed the 17th Indian Division and one Burmese division; both were being commanded by LtGeneral T.J. Hutton.

Japanese, some w/ cycles cross a temporary bridge in Burma.  Main structure destroyed by British.

Japanese, some w/ cycles cross a temporary bridge in Burma. Main structure destroyed by British.

16 January, British aircraft that remained on Singapore were flown to Sumatra.  From 20-31 January, British and Commonwealth troops transport to Singapore to aid in the defense of the island.  With all the planes absent, an appeal goes out to the RAF.

20 January, aircraft from 4 Japanese carriers began their bombing of New Britain at the port of Rabaul.  On the 23rd, 5000 enemy troops landed on New Britain,  New Ireland and Bougainville in the Solomon Islands.  New Britain’s northern tip went under enemy control.  These attacks and the heavy raids on Lae,  New Guinea brought the war dangerously close to Australia.

22 January, for this date I have included a link from WW2today.com that contains an Australian War Diary – CLICK HERE!

Battle of Balikpapan

Battle of Balikpapan

The Battle of Balikpapan on 24 January was the first time the US Navy fought a surface action since Dewey in 1898.  Japanese Admiral Nishimura’s destroyers went on a futile search for a Dutch submarines and left 12 transports unprotected in the anchorage.  The destroyers, USS John D. Ford, Pop, Parrot and Paul Jones arrived at 0300 hours and fired their guns and torpedoes – no hits.  Commander Talbot regrouped and went back a second time and attacked until they were out of ammunition.  Four transports were sunk, the Kuretake Maru, Nana Maru, Sumanoura Maru and Taksuami Maru; but the enemy campaign on Borneo continued.

25 January, Thailand officially declared war on the US and Britain.  They believed that Japan would ultimately win the war.

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HUMOR – 

unknown source

unknown source

from Chris @ Muscleheaded.wordpress.com/

from Chris @ Muscleheaded.wordpress.com/

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Farewell Salutes – 

Kenneth Ashley Sr. – Killeen, TX; US Army Sgt. (Ret. 20 yrs), Vietnam 2 tours, Purple Heart, 2 Bronze Stars

Frank Cardwell – Christchurch, NZ; RNZ Air Force # 422096, 617th Sqd. ‘Dam Busters’ 44 Sqd, WWIIBN91311

Hugh Dingsdale – (Born in Scotland), Burlington, CAN; RAF Military Transport, WWII, CBI, POW

Frank Eates Sr. – Portsmouth, VA; US Army, Korea, 11th Airborne Division

Theodore ‘Pete’ Enz – Appleton, WI; US Army, Sgt., WWII, ETO

Edmond Harjo – Seminole, OK; US Army, Pvt. Codetalker, 195th Field Artillery Batt., WWII

Myrtle Hoftiezer – Aurora, CO; WAC, WWII, nurse, ETO

Kenneth Isaak – Dickey County, ND; US Army, WWII, 70th Div., WWII

Marjorie McCall – Boca Raton, FL; civilian employee Vero Beach Naval Base, WWII

Glenn Plimpton – Orleans, MA; US Navy & civilian in advanced radar defenses

Howard Wagner – Weymouth, CAN; RC Army Medical Corps, WWII

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January 1942 (1)

Japanese light tanks and armored vehicles attack British Positions, Jan. '42

Japanese light tanks and armored vehicles attack British Positions, Jan. ’42

The “Oriental Blitzkrieg” did not end with the New Year’s arrival.  As the Allies attempted to reorganize, the Japanese tactics would continue for six more months.

2 January, some units of the Japanese 14th Army occupied Manila while the 48th Division pushed against the Porac Line of US defenders that were spread across the entrance of the Bataan Peninsula.  Much to Gen. Homma’s dismay, his well-trained men were being sent to Java and would replaced by the 65th “Summer Brigade” from Formosa.  Cavite naval base was taken and Brunei Bay at Borneo was occupied.

enemy tank knocked out by British antitank gunners. Jan. '42

enemy tank knocked out by British antitank gunners. Jan. ’42

3 January, Allied forces in southeast Asia were put under a joint command named ABDACOM (American-British-Dutch-Australian Command).  British General Sir Archibald Wavell acted as Supreme Commander with the headquarters on Java.  This attempt at a joint structure proved to be difficult due to international rivalries, code differences and teams trying to work together with no prior experience.  In China, Chiang Kai-shek was made the Commander-in-Chief of the Allied Forces of that nation.

the "Malahang Wreck" with Australian troops approaching.

the “Malahang Wreck” with Australian troops approaching.

4-19 January, the Indian 11th Division, British and Commonwealth forces were continually pushed back on Malaya.  The capital, Kuala Lumpur, was occupied on the 12th by the Japanese 25th Army.  On the 17th, 15 tanks burst through the lines as the enemy dropped paratroopers along the coast.   The 5th and 8th divisions’ positions pushed to within 100 miles (160 km) from Singapore on the 19th.

original crew of the USS Pollack

original crew of the USS Pollack

5-9 January, the submarine, the USS Pollack, commanded by Stanley Moseley, damaged the cargo ship, Heijo Maru; 2 days later, she sank the cargo ship, Unkai Maru No. 1 and on the 9th, she sank the freighter Telan Maru in Japanese waters.  /  Off Papua, New Guinea, the 49th Fighter Group damaged a Japanese 4,103 ton cargo ship that was then steered to the beach near Malahang.  On the 8th, she was destroyed.

9 January, Japanese Gen. Nara caused high casualties to is own troops when he ordered his over-aged Summer Brigade against the Abucay Line on Luzon.  MacArthur called on D.C. again for a “sea thrust” to be sent from Australia.  The US Chief of Naval Operations told FDR that they did not have enough ships for such an operation.  The president sent a New Year’s message to the Filipinos: “I can assure you that every possible vessel is bearing down…the strength that will eventually crush the enemy…”  Approximately 80,000 US and Filipino troops gallantly defended their positions until 23 January when I & II Corps were pushed 30 miles (48 km) south.

BATAAN

BATAAN

The moral of the American troops was waning quickly due to round-the-clock fighting, taunts from the enemy loud speakers, hunger, low supplies of medicine and lack of sleep.  Resentment was expressed for the refusal of Allied support, the Filipinos and MacArthur, who remained on Corregidor Island, in the endless verses of one of the most corrosive military dirges of WWII:

We’re the Battling Bastards of Bataan
No mama, no papa, no Uncle Sam,
No aunts, no uncles, no nephews, no nieces
No rifles, no plans or artillery pieces,
and nobody gives a damn!

But – despite disease and lack of support, the American and Filipino troops continued to fight on.

Click on images to enlarge.

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Military Humor – 

Bill Mauldin

Bill Mauldin

SLANG2

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Farewell Salutes – 

"Wounded Warrior" painting by U.S. Marine Michael Fay

“Wounded Warrior” painting by U.S. Marine Michael Fay

John Aziz – Toronto, CAN; RC Army; WWII

Wes Banks – St. Petersburg, FL; US Air Force, Vietnam

James Hurt – Pittsburg, KS; US Army, Capt. (Ret.), Vietnam, 189th Helicopter Comp., Bronze Star

Frank Knowlton – Kerhonkson, NY; US Army Air Corps, WWII

Henry Irwin – Wichland, WA; US Army, Korea, Purple Heart

John Moss – Whangarei, NZ; RNZ Air Force # Y78337, Warrant Officer

Jordon Spears (21) – Memphis, IN; USMC. Corporal, ISIS Campaign

Robert Walton Jr. – Lake Worth, FL; US Navy, WWII, 1st Beach Battalion, ETO

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New Year’s Day 1942

Carl Mydans, "Life" mag. photographer

Carl Mydans, “Life” mag. photographer

While the people of Japan celebrated New Year’s Day in their usual fashion, debts were paid, people thronged to the Meiji Shrine to throw coins at midnight and for good luck, red daruma dolls were purchased, all this was topped off with the news of military success against the Allies.  But all this gaiety did not please the military.  They were aware of just how arduous the war was going to be and strict discipline must be maintained.  General Muto said:  “The first step is to replace Shigenori Togo as Foreign Minister.” [similar to the US Secretary of State] –  (Togo had been opposed to the military aggression.  He had to go.)

Japanese visiting Yasukuni Jinja during the New Year's period.

Japanese visiting Yasukuni Jinja during the New Year’s period.

The Japanese in the Philippine Islands celebrated differently.  They closed in on Manila from two directions.  The southern troops were slowed about 40 miles out due to the amount of bridges that had been dynamited, but they were receiving very little opposition.  General Homma, only 17 miles away, halted his troops to prepare themselves in tight and clean formations to parade into the city.  MGeneral Koichi Abe, in the north, led his 48th Division into Manila in front of sullen Filipinos.

Luzon trenches; taken by: Carl Mydans

Luzon trenches; taken by: Carl Mydans

Carl Mydans, a photographer for Life magazine, and his wife Shelley, watched the influx of Japanese from their Bayview Hotel window as the invaders looted warehouses and homes.  They saw 3 companies of soldiers and sailors form ragged lines on the lawn of High Commissioner Francis Sayre’s residence.  Three cannons boomed as the American flag lowered and a sailor stepped on it.  He then put the Rising Sun in its place on the pole.  A band played the Japanese national anthem, Kimigayo.

Route to Manila

Route to Manila

The Emperor’s reign will last
For a thousand and then 8 thousand generations
Until pebbles become mighty rocks
Covered in moss.

A cable arrived from Carl’s employer: “ANOTHER FIRST-PERSON EYEWITNESS STORY BUT THIS WEEK WE PREFER AMERICANS ON THE OFFENSIVE.”  Mrs. Mydans sent the reply: “BITTERLY REGRET YOUR REQUEST UNAVAILABLE HERE.”

Click on images to enlarge.

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Political Humor – seuss-4

Dr_Seuss_World_War_II_Political_Cartoon_5

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Farewell Salutes – 

William Anderson – Warwick, RI; US Navy, Korea

Ingeborg Buonomo – Lecanto, FL; WAC, WWWIIroseglitterdivider_thumb

Norman Helfrich – Rabbit Lake, CAN; RC Army, WWII, ETO

Jery Kaas – Anthem, AZ; US Navy, WWII, USS Carolina

Lee Patrick – Niles, IN; US Navy, WWII, USS Cacapon

Brian Henry Senn – Auckland, NZ; RNZ Air Force # G83335, Flight Lt.

Tommy Shaw – Huntsville, AL; US Air Force, Korea, control tower operator

John Swett – Chicago, IL; US Army, WWII, ETO, POW

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HOME FRONT – Pictorial

"You're In the Army Now!"

“You’re In the Army Now!”

NOW THAT THE PAPERS ARE SIGNED – IT’S TIME TO WHIP THE MEN INTO SHAPE – BOOT CAMP!

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THEN – THE FINE TUNING OF YOUR SPECIALTY – MORE TRAINING!

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Humor – 

Courtesy of Chris

Courtesy of Chris

courtesy of Chris

courtesy of Chris

courtesy of Chris, found Here!

$T2eC16d,!zEE9s3!Y8ggBRV8SFcDlg~~60_35

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HUMOR –  What the civilians were reading on Sunday mornings…….

The famous Toonerville Trolley!

The famous Toonerville Trolley!

001 (800x232)

002 (800x164)

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Personal Request – 

Many of these pictures were taken from a newly acquired book, “The Victory Era in Color,” by Jeff Ethell.  This book was previously owned and inside the front cover was written — Harold L. Gregg 33294371 4 Oct 42 – 23 Dec 45 – 3 yrs – 3mos – 5 days

My request — Does ANY ONE have information on this person?

AND – a SHOUT OUT!!  to you vets in Arkansas – does this post today bring back any memories????

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Farewell Salutes – 

Pearl Agopsowicz – Calgary, CAN; CWAC, WWIIbig-hawk-thumbnail1

Thomas Birdsall – San Antonio, TX; US Navy, WWII & US Army MSgt. (Ret. 22yrs.)

Eugene Goldberg – NYC & Wellington, FL; Merchant Marine WWII, ETO

Paul Hicks – Boynton Beach, FL; US Navy, Cuban Missile Crisis

Owen “Osca” Hughes – Kingston, AUS; RA Navy, Rear Admiral (Ret.)

John Norton – Port Angeles, WA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, pilot/ US Air Force, Korea

James Perone – Westerly, RI; US Army, WWII, ETO

Cedric Sutherland – Tauranga, NZ; RNZ Air Force  # 441837, WWII

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Marine Dog – Lucca

Two Heroes!

Two Heroes!

Marine dog, Lucca, was given a wonderful tribute in the Parade Sunday magazine.  After more than 400 missions in Afghanistan, no one had been hurt by an IED when they were with her.  She was the only one that the Green Berets felt comfortable hugging after a tough day.

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Mamma Lucca, as she is nicknamed, was injured herself.  Handler Col. Juan “Rod” Rodriguez quickly applied a tourniquet and she was air-lifted to one veterinary team after another in all-out attempts to save her life.  They succeeded, but Lucca lost her left-front leg in the action.  You can see her honorary Purple Heart on her harness.  Today she lives with her original trainer, Gunnery Sgt. Chris Willingham and his family.  She continues to serve at VA hospitals and in schools.

Could someone please explain to me WHY this Hero’s Purple Heart is considered HONORARY??

If anyone is interested in adopting one of these dogs, check into – US War Dogs.org.

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Farewell Salutes – 

Heroes R.I.P.

Heroes R.I.P.

Stanley “Stosh” Bargy – Mattydale, NY; US Navy, Korea

G. Hayden Green – Anchorage, AK; US Army, Korea

Robert Harris – Plymouth, IN; USMC, Korea

Eugene Humphries – Shelley, ID; US Army, WWII, Aleutians & PTO

James Novak, Sr – Olathe, KS; US Army, WWII

Winfield Ruder – Wappingers Falls, NY; Merchant Marines, WWII

George Tillman – Perry, FL; US Army, WWII & Korea, SSgt.

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