11th Airborne Division honored

11th A/B trooper Wiiliam Carlisle on the cover of “Yank”

On the cover of the 14 September 1945 issue of Yank magazine,(Vol. 4 No. 13) is S/Sgt. William Carlisle of Chalmers, Indiana

This poem was written by: Pvt. Bronnell York, Battery D, 457th Parachute Field Artillery Battalion, 11th A/B; even if you are not a poetry enthusiast, it is worth reading.

“Victory For the U.S.A.”

We’re the boys of the 457,
Earning our major pay,
Fighting Japs and jungle life,
For three sixty cents a day.

Back home we’re soon forgotten,
By girls and friends we knew,
Here in the South Seas Islands,
Ten thousand miles from you.

All night the rains keep falling,
It’s more than we can stand,
“NO” folks, we’re not convicts,
We’re defenders of our land.

We’re the boys of many,

Bronnell York’s original poem

Holding the upper hand,
Hitting the silk and hoping,
We’re living when we land.

We’re having it pretty tough now,
You can believe what I say,
Some day we hope to live again,
Back home in the USA.

Victory’s in the making,
Our future will be serene,
We’ve got the Navy backing us,
Along with the fighting Marines.

We’re in this all together,
Fellas like you and me,

We’ll be a united people,
And our Country will be free.

There’s no two ways about it,
We’ll either do or die,
For our Country with dictation,
Is not for you or I.

When the war is over,
And we have finished what they began,
We’ll raise Old Glory high above,
The Empire of Japan.

So, to all you 4F jokers,
Who thinks there’s something you missed,
Don’t let the draft board get you,
And for God’s sake don’t enlist.

It might be a long time yet,
Then it might be any day,
When smiling faces see the Golden Gate,
And sail in Frisco Bay.

When this conflict’s over,
The boys can proudly say,
We had to fight for what was ours,
Victory for the U.S.A.!

*****         *****          *****

11th Airborne Memorial

Some of my friends and readers who visit often might remember this cover of Yanks magazine with William Carlisle , of the 11th A/B on the cover.  Koji of http://p47koji.wordpress.com notified me that he found a William and Norma Carlisle in Chalmers, IN.

I sent a note to inquire about the photo.  I received this reply from his widow:

Hello! So nice of you to write, Bob would have been pleased. The picture on the cover of the Yank magazine is William Robert Carlisle, my husband. I’m sure he could have told you stories of the 11th Airborne.  I’m Mrs. Norma Carlisle, Bob’s wife. I’m sorry to tell you that Bob passed away on Dec. 12 – 1997. I miss him! Hope you and yours are enjoying the Golden Years! God Bless, Norma

I was so disappointed to discover that we had lost yet another trooper’s tales of the era and a little taken back to see that he passed on what would have been my father’s 83rd birthday.

With many thanks to Josh, we now have a link to the war memorial that honors the 11th Airborne using Mr. Carlisle’s photo as a model.

http://www.warmemorialhq.org/cpg/thumbnails.php?album=520

Click on images to enlarge.

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Military Humor – 

“I dropped out of parachute school.”

 

 

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Stanley Abraham – Greenwood, NY; US Army, WWII, 299th Combat Engineers

Bobby ‘Pete’ Beckett – Logan, WV; US Army, WWII, Medic

Martha Groton – Washington D.C.; US Navy WAVE, WWII

Gordon Huff – CAN; RC Navy, WWII

William Jones – Tucker, GA; US Navy, WWII

James Myers – Rouseville, PA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, Co. A/188/11th Airborne Division

Virgil Oyler – Barberton, OH; US Navy, WWII, aviation

Merle Smith – Clark County, WA; US Navy, Pearl Harbor, Electrician’s Mate 3rd Cl., USS Oklahoma, KIA

Randall Troop – Manchester, MA; US Navy, WWII, USS Colorado, radar

James Watson – Roanoke, VA; US Navy, WWII, ETO

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on June 20, 2019, in WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 115 Comments.

  1. I’m slowly catching up again, GP!

    Liked by 2 people

  2. GP: If you’d be interested in reviewing any of my WWII books, please let me know. None are strictly about the Pacific, but they each have stories of men who fought in the Pacific.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you. As you know, I don’t often do book reviews on this site and sometimes Amazon blocks my reviews because I don’t spend enough money with them, but I’ll see what I can do. Any hints?

      Liked by 1 person

  3. The thing that caught my attention was 360 cents a day. No wonder Yanks had money when on leave! Our blokes only got 5 bob (50 cents these days) a day! I remember Dad saying that when they sailed off to the Middle East the left press had headlines “5 Bob a Day Murderers!” Actually, Dad reckoned it was 4 bob a day initially. Great post as usual GP.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Thanks for letting me know. That newspaper was pretty heartless, wasn’t it? Do you happen to know the conversion rate of a Bob to U.S. cents back then?

      Like

  4. Do you think people would sign up and be as patriotic as this man in their masses now?
    Nationalism is being discouraged and Brexit blamed on it. My cousin is just leaving the RAF after 10 years because he wants to start a family and he’s done with long stints overseas.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. I also come on here for “parachutist”. He’s my parachute man. ♥️.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Victory for the USA! ♥️

    Liked by 2 people

  7. nice one mate.. great poem.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. I found the lyrics of that song heartbreaking, GP. So glad you chose to share it.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Really appreciated Private York’s sobering and moving poem, GP, giving the whole picture from someone who knows well the horrors of war. Also liked the exchange you had with the widow of William Carlisle. Wonderful post and much appreciated.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Another nice tribute. Understanding WWII keeps us in check. Cheers!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. This made me tear up. The letter from his widow was so kind and heartfelt. Thank you, GP.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. As a poet of sorts gp, I always appreciate the poetic mind, and more so with military words that are written to rhyme, their words like this poem are the true mindset of the Warrior

    Liked by 1 person

  13. A wonderful piece of detective work with a poignant ending. I was touched with the line in the poem about them being forgotten by the people at home. I doubt that was true, but it speaks to the isolation they were feeling.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Mooii gediçcht.Die strijders verdienen ons respect

    Liked by 1 person

  15. That’s a great cover pic and I love the poem. It speaks volumes about how the valour of such great men can go so easily forgotten. Yet, we owe them so much!

    Liked by 1 person

  16. That ‘drop-out’ cartoon … classic~!

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Very strong and proud poem, GP; thank you for sharing it. The widow Carlisle must have been so touch that her late husband is remembered and honored!

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Love this post! Poignant and very touching! That must be a surprise for Mrs. Carlisle to hear from you. Good for you to trace her down.
    Love this particular line: We had to fight for what was ours, Victory for the U.S.A.!

    Liked by 1 person

  19. From my heart, I offer this hand salute

    Liked by 1 person

  20. You really know how to publish an emotional post, GP. How about a humorous one to celebrate summer? Keep up the good work. Our generation is lucky–our parents were the greatest generation. Not sure being the offspring of Boomers or X-ers is as much cause for celebration.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Wow what an awesome poem. I love this post! Very touching 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Touching poem! Did Private York make it back to see the Golden Gate Bridge?

    Liked by 1 person

  23. A wonderful poem, and great honour. Could be a great song too. Thank you for sharing this unique piece, GP! Best wishes, Michael

    Liked by 1 person

  24. I’ve never seen this poem, GP. RT–it’s a keeper.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. What a wonderful surprise to Sgt Carlisle’s widow I imagine. There are no coincidences I believe. Great post, thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. What a moving poem- thanks so much for finding it and sharing.
    It’s a shame that you weren’t able to talk to Mr. Carlisle, but I’m sure it meant a lot to his wife to hear from you.

    Liked by 1 person

  27. A touching post, GP. Norma has to be pleased knowing people care.

    Liked by 1 person

  28. Like you, I regret all the stories that have been lost. I was privileged to capture a few from a 93 year-old vet and tell them to his sons who had never heard them. Thank you again for sharing so many of those stories through your blog.
    Total non sequitur: If I calculate it correctly, “three sixty cents a day” was as much as a private made in Vietnam despite inflation showing how quickly politicians forgot once the war was over the sacrifice soldiers make.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. Such a touching letter from his widow.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. A poem that touches the heart and is filled with true pride for the USA!

    Liked by 1 person

    • They were quite a unit, though disbanded as a division now, the 187th Regimental Combat Team has served in every conflict since WWII. The “Rakkasans” rock!!! (the Japanese nickname they gave the 187th – “Umbrella men”.

      Liked by 1 person

  31. These from-the-heart expressions of determination and pride always are touching. And it’s wonderful to see both the cover and the statue, and to know that Mrs. Carlisle was made aware that people still are paying attention. It has to make a difference to people like her.

    Liked by 1 person

  32. “Hitting the silk and hoping,
    We’re living when we land.”

    All to often we forget how perilous their day-to-day situation really was.

    Liked by 1 person

  33. A first hand experience straight from the trenches. I’m glad we can continue to honor him (and them) and that his wife knows people are paying their respect.

    Liked by 2 people

  34. Such a heartfelt poem from someone who ‘knew’. And a touching letter from Mrs Carlisle too.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 2 people

  35. Argh forgot the tissues!

    Liked by 1 person

  36. Being an admirer of Admiral Nimitz, I salute you for including that Nimitz quote!

    Liked by 1 person

  37. Lump in throat. Thank you for this poignant post.

    Liked by 2 people

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