Everett (Smitty) Smith

young Everett and Mother, Anna

Everett Smith was born Dec. 12, 1914 and grew up with the gentle waves of Jamaica Bay on an island one mile long and barely four blocks wide.  This was the tight-knit community of Broad Channel, New York.  He resided with his mother, Anna at peaceful 207 East 9th Road and spent his days between school, working and helping to care for his grandmother.

Aerial view of Broad Channel

 

Smitty’s, Broad Channel, NY

Everett’s nickname had always been “Smitty” and so, the name of his fishing station came to be.  In 1939, at 24 years of age, he married a woman named Catherine and she joined the Smith household.

News of Hitler and his rise to power filtered into the newspapers and radio, but Anna still had the memories of WWI and their financial struggles in what would be become known as the Great Depression made the problems of Europe so far away.

Grassy Point, Broad Channel, where Smitty often tended bar.

The majority of the U.S. population held the ideal of isolationism in high regard and the Smith household agreed wholeheartedly.  Everett was baffled by FDR’s election as his past political and personal records indicated both amoral and often criminal behavior.  The president began to stretch his powers to the limit to assist his friend, Winston Churchill, while U.S. citizens were straining to survive.

On Oct. 30, 1940, Roosevelt spouted in Boston, “I give you one more assurance.  I have said it before, but I shall say it again and again and again: Your boys are not going to be sent to any foreign wars.”  My father did not believe FDR then and as we look back — he was right.

Draft card
You’re in the Army now!

Everett received his draft notice in Sept. 1942.  He would be sent to Fort Dix, New Jersey where he volunteered for the paratroopers.  He would immediately then be sent to Camp MacKall, North Carolina for the start of his vigorous training.  Smitty became part of one of the most unique army units of its day, the HQ Co./187th/ 11th Airborne Division.

Smitty, 187th RCT/11th Airborne Division, Camp MacKall 1943

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Military Humor –

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Chris Andreadakis – Youngstown, OH; US Army, WWII, ETO

Paul Brown (100) – Saginaw, MI; US navy, WWII

Arlington Cemetery

Thomas ‘Millar’ Bryce (101) – Saskatchewan, CAN; RC Air Force, WWII, navigator

Robert “Cookie” Cook  (100) – Rochester, NY; US Army, WWII

Aaron M. Fish – USA; US Navy, Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 5, Petty Officer 3rd Class

Dick Hall (100) – Murray, NE; US Army, WWII, ETO, 94th Chemical Mortars/3rd Army Tank Battalion, Lt.

E. Allan Logel (100) – Mapelwood, NJ; US Army, WWII, PTO, Captain, Strategic planning

Donald Myers – Cambria, IA; US Navy, WWII, PTO & Korea

Ken P. Smith – USA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 2/187/11th Airborne Division

Martha Watts – Charleston, NC; US Army WAC, WWII

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About GP

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GP is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on March 8, 2021, in ABOUT, Broad Channel, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 164 Comments.

  1. Hey friend you are top of the world i like your post

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Great tribute to your father, GP. Through his story we learn history.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. I aurge everyone to get on my link https://linktr.ee/culgrin to visit my blog and listen to my songs ,my EP is live on all PLATFORMS, everyone should help me share with friends and family

    Liked by 1 person

    • Everyone has different interests and saying that everyone should help you is no way to get new readers. Try going on the Reader page and type in Tags for interests you have, such as Music, Song Writing, Musical instruments…..

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Yeah ,we need to keep more history visit my blog

    Liked by 2 people

  5. The veil is lifted. How naive we were!

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Very nice, a personal story about how our lives pan out.. A good one GP! 💜💜💜

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Reblogged this on By the Mighty Mumford and commented:
    THANK YOU FOR REMEMBERING THE PROUD SERVICE INCLUDING YOURSELF–OF MEN AND WOMEN FOR THIS COUNTRY!

    Liked by 2 people

  8. I am struck by the draft card photo GP. What a feeling it must have been for families to receive one in the mail box.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. Hallelujah and Amen GOD Bless All our Veterans and their Families and Friendds!!

    Love Always and Shalom, YSIC \o/

    Kristi Ann

    Liked by 3 people

  10. It’s so great reading of your dad and gives me such a warm feeling.I have a lot of problems with internet on this time

    Liked by 2 people

    • Ik ben zo blij dat je nog steeds geniet van de berichten, Marylou. Ik heb zelf problemen gehad om online te gaan, maar ik weet niet of het internet, de oude bedrading van mijn gemeenschap of mijn computer de problemen veroorzaakt. Ik wou dat ik meer begreep van computers.
      Blijf veilig, mijn vriend!

      Liked by 1 person

  11. I hadn’t realized that FDR had such a bad background, since we rarely hear about it these days. But it just goes to show that “the more things change, the more they remain the same.” Politicians sure haven’t changed much, have they?

    Liked by 3 people

  12. It’s great to see the reintroduction of your father on your blog. Bet he’d be floored by the amount of interest his story has generated!

    Liked by 4 people

  13. Most people today just don’t know the personal sacrifice that so many made to bring WW II to a conclusion. Lives were interrupted and often lost and whole families torn apart. Today for most kids it’s not even a footnote on their smart phone. History is a great teacher if only people would listen.

    Liked by 3 people

  14. I’m so glad you’ve gone back and provided some background; I hope there will be more. I remember you talking about fishing and the water, but I somehow assumed you were Florida-born. Not so! It’s doubly interesting to me because I’ve always tended to think of New York as wholly urban. It’s only been in the past years that I’ve gotten a grasp on a quite different world there!

    FDR’s “Your boys are not going to be sent to any foreign wars” brought to mind “Read my lips — no new taxes.” Politicians’ ability to read the room and tell people what they want to hear is quite something.

    Liked by 3 people

  15. This was wonderful! I so enjoyed the early years of your dad and his family, and also the perspective of Americans at that time. Roosevelt was not the beloved character I was taught about in school. My grandmother reminded me of that many times.

    Liked by 3 people

  16. Wonderful to know your father, GP. Looking forward for more since I was not here from the start. I agree about FDR. “Your boys are not going to be sent to any foreign wars.” What a joke! He got a pass on his scandals, just like what is happening today with someone at the WH.

    Liked by 3 people

  17. GP, I love this post — the descriptions, the photos. Heartfelt thanks for sharing it with us. Hugs on the wing!

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thank you, Teagan.
      I also need to thank you for considering making us clockwork figures in your story at some time. Pat and I can travel aboard the Pearl forever that way!

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Such bright eyes in that first photograph

    Liked by 2 people

  19. Thanks for sharing about you father’s life before he joined

    Liked by 2 people

  20. Thank God that Roosevelt helped us during the early years of the war. What would have happened otherwise? All of Europe and the Soviet Union under Hitler’s heel and all of the western Pacific and Asia under the Japanese. And they wouldn’t have stopped there!

    Liked by 5 people

    • There are always other sides to a story. The problem was, he did not have Congressional approval for most of what he sent you, and the citizens were in such bad shape they wanted no part of helping Europe when they were starving. Then we have your side, where you were being bombed!

      Liked by 1 person

  21. I am SO honored to be meeting your father through you, GP. I look forward to getting to know more about him. Even if I learned nothing about him…I would be grateful to him for two things….
    1. for serving our country.
    2. for raising a son like you.
    Thank you, Smitty!
    I’m sitting here with joy-tears in my eyes.
    (((HUGS))) 🙂
    PS…the boot camp humor made me snort-laugh. So, that proves I’ve never been to boot camp. If I had I might not find that funny. 🙂 My only connection to it is stories I’ve heard from men and women who have served, having met a few Drill sergeants/instructors, Sergeant Carter on Gomer Pyle USMC, and Marine Gunnery Sergeant Tom Highway (Clint Eastwood) in the movie Heartbreak Ridge. 🙂 Ha. 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  22. I always meant to go back and read the posts about your father- I’m looking forward to more installments! (It’s funny, I just read a WWII nurse’s memoirs and she had some choice things to say about FDR, too.)

    Liked by 3 people

  23. Thank you for this personal story. Are we going to learn more about Smitty in an upcoming post?

    Liked by 3 people

  24. I’m thinking how sad your mother and grandmother must have been the day he received his draft card. Keep the story flowing!

    Liked by 4 people

    • My mom lived basically around the corner from him, but they weren’t dating until after the war. I know my grandmother, a strong woman in her own right, was as lost without Dad as were other mothers.

      Like

  25. Glad to learn more about Smitty, G. He was born at about the same time as my mother. Speaking of our entry into WWII, I wonder what the world might look like had we not? Any ideas? I looked up Jamaica Bay so I could get a better grasp on your roots. 🙂 I always think Florida when I think of you. –Curt

    Liked by 3 people

  26. This is a great story, and it is great to read about it. Nice honor to your father.

    Liked by 3 people

  27. I got this response from Teagan when I asked her if she might give us a bit part in the Delta Pearl Serial
    OMG! I would be honored. Tell GP that you both night be clockworks. Any preface as to what? If you are in contact with him, please ask for me.
    So what type of Clockwork would you like to be? I think I would like to be a bookworm or a butterfly.

    Liked by 3 people

  28. My father was a few months older, born Feb. 1915. At an old farmhouse we rented from 1958-63, us nosy kids found a Wendell Willkie for President 1940, campaign button. Like so many things from childhood, don’t know what happened to it.

    Liked by 4 people

  29. It’s great to meet your dad! I look forward to getting to know him better.

    Liked by 3 people

  30. Greetings…that sticks in my mind as well…the fotos are also captivating to me GP…I also know little of WWI…thanks for your teachings ~ smiles hedy 🤓☺️

    Liked by 3 people

  31. My father was a little older than yours. I agree, it is wonderful you still have that draft card, GP!

    Liked by 3 people

  32. Good biography and great humor.

    Liked by 4 people

  33. Great post, GP. Good to read the story of Smitty.

    Liked by 4 people

  34. You have a real treasure of old photographs of your dad you shared with us today. Your love for him shows through all the posts you have published since I began to follow your blog, GP.

    Liked by 3 people

  35. Had to look up the Executive Order and totally agree on the illegality of the order. Ironically they never felt the need to do the same to the Italian or German emigrants.

    Liked by 2 people

  36. Loved the intro to Smitty. Was interested to read about his wife, Anna. I guess I didn’t realize that he was already married at this time. Was she your grandmother or will that be revealed in a future blog post? Keep up the good work. This may become as addicting as Teagan’s serials.

    Liked by 4 people

  37. For those of us who discovered your blog late, viz., me, and missed the beginning of your chronicle of the war in the Pacific, this re-introduction to your father is most helpful. Now I can really start getting to know him, like reading a great story from the beginning. On an historical note, I am reminded that the revered FDR was like all other politicians — not to be believed. Looking forward to the next installment.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Exactly, though for some, FDR is still thought to be God’s gift to the USA. (Some people just drink the Kool-aid)

      Liked by 1 person

      • FDR — oh, yes, the man who ordered the U.S. concentration camps for Japanese Americans, German and Italian too — a hideous legacy yet seldom if ever referred to, swept under the rug as the saying goes. I bet the people who religiously visit the FDR Museum in Hyde Park, NY, not too far from where I live don’t even know about it.

        Liked by 3 people

  38. Looking forward to following Smitty’s progress. Interesting how FDR was regarded…so off to research!

    Liked by 3 people

  39. How wonderful that you still have the draft card. Thanks for the backstory, GP!

    Liked by 3 people

  40. FDR’s criminal behavior???

    Liked by 5 people

  41. Great remembrance, GP! I also love the way one got invited on the draft card “Will you kindly …” 😉 The friendliness on the other side was probably only up to the first roll call. Thank you, and have a beautiful week! Michael

    Liked by 4 people

  42. It’s good to know a little about Smitty’s early days. I’m glad you started with this, GP.

    Liked by 6 people

  43. Ken P. Smith – USA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 2/187/11th Airborne Division
    Ken never jumped in combat, but he landed on Leyte and Luzon. He humped over the mountain pass from Burauen to Mohonag to Ormoc with Smitty’s 2d Battalion. Ken did a tandem jump on his birthday every year up until his 95th birthday. Ken really looked forward to skydiving every year and he was trying to get someone to take him to the airport on his last birthday at the age of 97!

    Liked by 5 people

    • Thank you for including a story of your father. This is a loss for the entire world. We will never be able to duplicate that generation!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Thanks for your blog keeping these memories alive. Ken was not on the internet, so I printed out some of your blogs. He remembered some of the incidents, and he was glad to know that people were documenting what these paratroopers did on Leyte. Your efforts were much appreciated.

        Liked by 4 people

        • You may wish to look into the books by Gen. E.M. Flanagan. especially, “The Angels: A History of the 11th Airborne Division” and “Rakkasans” about the 187th.

          Like

  44. Great history, GP. Wonderful to still have that draft card.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 7 people

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