Comrades – Ken Moore

 

New Zealand troops fire a 25-pounder at Kapyong, Korea

New Zealand troops fire a 25-pounder at Kapyong, Korea

My own ANZAC Day post is scheduled for tomorrow, but once I read this…..

75(nz)squadron

On ANZAC day, I thought it was fitting to re-post this poem. It felt a little strange, almost uncommfortable to be removing the airmen from the Roll of Honour to present a purely RNZAF and RAAF list for my previous ANZAC day post, so perhaps to make amends and remind us that the boys flew and died together, irrespective of their nationalities I represent ‘Comrades‘, by Ken Moore.

New Zealand gave a Squadron of Planes
When Britain’s need was dire
Both countries sons made up the crews
And they flew through hell and fire.

To the Pommy lads the Kiwi’s made
A gesture that was grand
They gave them honorary citizenship
Of their own beloved land.

Under New Zealand’s flag, they proudly flew
Comrades of the air
They lived and died, as side by side
Fate’s lot they chose to share.

In Wellingtons, Stirlings, then Lancasters
To the…

View original post 91 more words

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on April 25, 2014, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 28 Comments.

  1. I have read so many content about the blogger lovers except this piece of writing is genuinely a nice piece of writing, keep it
    up.

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    • Thank you very much. The blogs give us a platform to show our thoughts, photos, research, etc. without having the finances or computer expertise for a major website. Grated – many are children simulating their facebook page and people who like to rant or preach their ideas, but I believe you’ll discover a nice group of educated, like-minded adults at this site who offer me further information and encouragement to continue and a willingness to learn.

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  2. Great poetic tribute.
    Tells a great story of comradeship.
    Ian

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  3. RT–warriors can be excellent poets.

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  4. Many thanks for the reblog GP – much appreciated – and I am touched by the number of people who came to look at it today – many thanks again

    Ake Ake Kia Kaha

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    • My pleasure. As you know, I read your posts everyday, but something about this one, I just clicked the reblog. I have a great bunch of friends here who respect the military and what they sacrifice for the rest of us.

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  5. Great bit of history – thanks for posting it. The picture on the originating site is quite amazing..

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  6. Went to ANZAC Day Dawn service at Martin Place in Sydney – thousands gathered…moving. So much pride!

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    • That says much about your character. I’m proud to know you. It must have been a moving experience.

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      • From babies in arms to veterans in wheelchairs, many many thousands – the largest crowd ever at this event – the most touching to me were the projections of soldier faces on facades of surrounding buildings…a great number of Australian-Croatians fought in Australian forces throughout many decades particularly from Dalmatia where I was born – one even received the Victoria Cross for Bravery in Borneo/WWII – Leslie Tom Starcevich … there will be an ANZAC service headed by Australian Ambassador to Croatia – it will be held on my birth island of Korcula – I hope to receive material from it and write about it.

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  7. What a beautiful poem. Thanks for sharing and reminding me that there were men and women from many different places who participated.

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  8. Good Morning, as always; I love your posts. I have a question on a personal note. My father Robert S. Murdoch, of Ballymoney, Co. Antrim, Ireland; had a friend by the name of Charlie Clark(e); also of Ballymoney. He too was in Korea and was killed in action. I’ve searched the CWGC records, but have been unable to find him. I suppose I just don’t have enough information. I’ve always wondered about him, as my dad always spoke of him; I even have a photo of my father and him together before he left to serve. Any hints on how to find him would be appreciated. Thanks again!

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    • Colleen, first off – Good morning to you as well. Second – thanks a bunch for the ego boost! Third – if you know his unit, there might be an association of veterans there that can help. I’m not familiar with Ireland’s record system, but a veteran’s association of any sort should be able to steer you in the right direction. I wish you the best of luck in your search, perhaps a relative of Mr. Clarke’s will emerge, (such as on Pierre’s blog).

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      • Thank you for responding; unfortunately I know nothing else of Charlie. For some odd reason his memory, via my father; has just stuck with me. Since I’m heading to Ireland in July maybe I’ll “run into” someone who knows his family. 😀

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        • That just might be, but in the meantime, as on Pierre’s site, you might want to post the picture and see if anyone recognizes him. Once the picture is on-line, a relative might spot it from any number of ways.

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  9. I commented on the original post as it made me remember a distant new Zealand relative who joined the RAF and was killed.

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    • So sorry to hear that. The post seemed to hit me and I hit the reblog before I knew it – I thought it might hit others the same. The men fought for us from many countries!

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  10. I thought the New Zealand group sang this song: Bless Them All. I looked it up and it is interesting so I am putting it here for you. Godfrey claimed to have thought up the lyrics for the song while serving with the Royal Naval Air Service at Dunkirk during the First World War, recalling in a 1941 letter to the Daily Mirror: “I wrote “Bless ’Em All” while serving in the old R.N.A.S. in France in 1916. And, furthermore, it wasn’t “Bless.'” Although the song is credited to him, it is unclear if he actually wrote the lyrics, and his service record indicates that he joined RNAS January 1917.[1] Les Cleveland (1984) writes that a version of the song titled Fuck ‘Em All was a popular protest song by airmen serving on India’s North West Frontier during the 1920s, and may have originated from there. It later gained popularity among British and Commonwealth troops during the Second World War, and with a change of lyrics became a patriotic tune after being performed by singers such as Gracie Fields.[2] It was also recorded by George Formby and others. [3]

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