Smitty Was HERE!!

Miyajima Hotel

Being that Smitty so enjoyed taking in the sights of 1945 Japan and it is Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, this post will continue with the brochures he brought home with him. Above is the Inland Sea and Miyajima Island that is approximately 45 minutes from Hiroshima; the entire island is considered a park being that two parks are actually on the island, The Omoto and the Momijidani, both famous for their cherry blossoms in spring and colored leaves in autumn.

The Great Torii

The Great Torii (52′ tall [16 metres]) is the red religious structure within the bay is from the 16th century. The earlier one had been destroyed by a typhoon. The Itsukushima Shrine has stone lanterns that remain lighted throughout the night. Senjokaku is the hall of a thousand mats and beside the shrine is a hall filled with countless rice ladles offered by worshipers. There is a five-storied pagoda (100 feet high) for Buddha close by and in the Omoto Park is a two-storied pagoda built by “Hidari-Jingoro” an ancient famous artist.

The center photo showing a patio, Smitty indicated that that was where they ate. And the circle to the right, dad wrote, “Damn good fishing and crabbing here.” It seems you can’t even take the Broad Channel, NY fisherman out of the soldier.

At the bottom picture here, Smitty wrote, “I slept here in a room like this.” On the right-hand side of the page is written, “I managed to get behind the bar at this place.” (Can’t take the bartender out of the trooper either, I suppose.) If any reader is capable of translating any of the Japanese writing in these posts, please do so. I have wondered for many years what they meant.

Gamagori Hotel

At the Gamagori Hotel, above the bottom-left photo is written, “Good Food. Chef here studied under a Frenchman. Boy was the food tasty.” The right-hand photo has, “Fishing good here.”

Gamagori Hotel

On this page of the Gamagori brochure, Smitty marked on the center diagram where his general stayed. (If viewing is a problem, please click on the photo to enlarge.) The bottom-left photo is

Gamagori Hotel

marked, “Had a room like this at this place.”

 

From Christopher:

  1. I was a student in Hiroshima and spent numerous happy times on Miyajima, the sacred island near the city. I do read Japanese and was intrigued by your curiosity around the second hotel in Gamagori. I did a wee bit of snooping and there is one hotel called the Classic Hotel that looks to be on or at least very near the site of the old hotel where your dad was, judging by the angle of the view from the balcony out towards a small shrine island (you can tell by the torii gate at the far end of the footbridge that leads out to it). The interior photos of the hotel lead me to believe that it is in fact the selfsame establishment! Take a look at this link, and be sure to look at it in satellite view to judge the island/footbridge connection. https://www.google.com/maps/place/Gamagori+Classic+Hotel/@34.8146423,137.2284047,3536m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m18!1m9!2m8!1sHotels!3m6!1sHotels!2sGamagori,+Aichi,+Japan!3s0x6004c72269565b9d:0x9147f2ae0439082f!4m2!1d137.2197862!2d34.8259551!3m7!1s0x6004c71f1b063675:0x9e5a3ad8731c513e!5m2!4m1!1i2!8m2!3d34.8158288!4d137.2359435 Then click on the Classic Hotel link!

 

 

 

This brochure is entirely in Japanese and therefore unable to give the reader a clue as to where it was or still is located.  Thanks to our fellow blogger, Christopher, we have a translation here…… Please stop by his site where you will find a lot of very interesting data!!

  1. The colorfully illustrated brochure says “Sightseeing in Miyagi Prefecture” (観光の宮城縣)and lists several of the highlights (skiing, cherry blossoms, shrines). The 3-D illustrated map shows the whole area, featuring the famous destination of Matsushima. Now, today it’s considered old-fashioned, but there is this thing called “The Three Sights of Japan” (日本三景), pronounced Nihon Sankei, which refers to what were traditionally considered the three most beautiful places in the country: Matsushima, Miyajima, and Ama no Hashidate. It looks like your dad hit at least two of them — I wonder if he also made it to Ama no Hashidate! Here is a modern link to “things to do in Miyagi Prefecture”: https://www.google.com/search?ei=42UuXZ7LMc3B7gLEwpzACQ&q=%E5%AE%AE%E5%9F%8E%E7%B8%A3&oq=%E5%AE%AE%E5%9F%8E%E7%B8%A3&gs_l=psy-ab.3..0l2j0i30l8.29273.32641..38871…1.0..0.80.438.6……0….1..gws-wiz…….0i71j0i4i37.nNS_NTAA6-Y
    Fun stuff… Thanks for sharing!

 

CLICK ON IMAGES TO ENLARGE!!

*****          *****          *****          *****

… and so was Smitty !!!!

SMITTY _ New Guinea 10/24/44

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Military Humor – 

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Robert Beaudoin – Dover, NH; USMC, WWII, PTO

Charles Behrens – Bronx, NY; US Navy, WWII, PTO, Quartermaster 1st Class, USS Chikaskia

George Evans – Toronto, OH; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 11th Airborne Division

Harold Feldman (100) – Great Bend, KS; US Army, WWII, Pfc

Wilbur Henry – York, PA; US Army, WWII, CBI, 10th Chinese Army

Walter Kippen – Quebec, CAN; RC Air Force, WWII, pilot

John R. McGruther – NZ; RNZ Army, WWII, ETO, KIA

Robert Peters, Bradley, IL; US Army, WWII, ETO, POW

Chadwick Rickey – Boise, ID; US Navy, WWII, underwater demolition

Albert Schmoker – Austin, TX; US Army Air Corps, WWII, aviation instructor

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on July 15, 2019, in First-hand Accounts, SMITTY, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 90 Comments.

  1. Hiya! I just saw something and thought of you. They just opened Broad Channel’s newest park, Sunset Cove, over by the ballfield between W 20th Road and the Crossbay Veterans’ Memorial Bridge! I haven’t been there yet, but we used to kayak through there, and it seems much improved. I know I can’t tempt you to come for a BC visit, so here’s the next best thing:

    Enjoy!

    Liked by 2 people

  2. It is good you have all this memorabilia your father left for you!

    Liked by 3 people

  3. Smitty certainly saw many sights in his travels gp, probably scenes that have changed over the years and no longer appear as Smitty first experienced. Lovely to see the old Shrines still standing and hear of the rituals that have been carried down over centuries.
    Enjoyed your post mate.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thank you, Ian. I was happy to see that not everything was bombed during the war. I know they always said they tried to just hit target vital to their war effort – but you know how mistakes can happen.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I can remember sitting in grade school classrooms and doodling that “Kilroy” figure. That would have been about 1952-1956, which helps to explain why Kilroy still was so popular. The brochures are beautiful, and your dad clearly was one who liked to explore. I had to smile at his notes about the good fishing and crabbing spots, too. Back in those days, you could keep notes like that private. Put the information on Facebook today, and you’d find your special spot overrun with competitors!

    Liked by 3 people

  5. Real history is biography as we re4ad it here, great slice of life. I note the proximity of Smitty to Australia when he was in PNG.

    Liked by 3 people

  6. Just so you know, I am still here, but I changed my name due to a stalker… ugh. Hugs! (Tamara)

    Liked by 3 people

  7. Another great Smitty adventure in occupied Japan
    I loved the Beetle Bailey.

    Liked by 3 people

  8. A beautiful share in keeping a legend much alive in tribute GP.

    Liked by 3 people

  9. Sure! The colorfully illustrated brochure says “Sightseeing in Miyagi Prefecture” (観光の宮城縣)and lists several of the highlights (skiing, cherry blossoms, shrines). The 3-D illustrated map shows the whole area, featuring the famous destination of Matsushima. Now, today it’s considered old-fashioned, but there is this thing called “The Three Sights of Japan” (日本三景), pronounced Nihon Sankei, which refers to what were traditionally considered the three most beautiful places in the country: Matsushima, Miyajima, and Ama no Hashidate. It looks like your dad hit at least two of them — I wonder if he also made it to Ama no Hashidate! Here is a modern link to “things to do in Miyagi Prefecture”: https://www.google.com/search?ei=42UuXZ7LMc3B7gLEwpzACQ&q=%E5%AE%AE%E5%9F%8E%E7%B8%A3&oq=%E5%AE%AE%E5%9F%8E%E7%B8%A3&gs_l=psy-ab.3..0l2j0i30l8.29273.32641..38871…1.0..0.80.438.6……0….1..gws-wiz…….0i71j0i4i37.nNS_NTAA6-Y
    Fun stuff… Thanks for sharing!

    Liked by 3 people

    • I appreciate all your help. I will work on getting this info up into the post later on (it might be overlooked here in the comments) and most certainly give you credit for doing this for us!! Thank you! You would have made a great MISer !!

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Apology. Is there an email address for you that I can attach some images and send them to you? It’s probably posted here somewhere, but I can’t see it.
    You can send it privately to my address jcalberta48@gmail.com. If you don’t wish to that’s OK.
    I know you sent some method to do this a while back, but I’m so technically challenged I couldn’t figure it out.

    Anyway great recollections from Smitty!!

    Liked by 3 people

  11. After reading you some time, I even think I know Smitty.

    Liked by 3 people

  12. It must have been a wonderful feeling to walk on Japanese soil as a victor, especially after risking his life for so long and being asked, in all probability, to spend the best years of his life in places he wouldn’t have wanted to go to if he’d had the choice. He must have seen too, before it disappeared for ever, the last few years of a Japan which had not been influenced by western culture.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Remember back in the 50’s and 60’s everything you bought seemed to be stamped “Made in Japan” just as today everything instead says ‘China’? Now that you’ve mentioned it, I do seem to recall a little scowl on his face when he said, ‘It seems everything is made in Japan these days.’ I wish I was more aware back then of what he went through so I’d be able to ask more pertinent questions.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Surprising and pleasing that he thought to keep the brochures of places he visited. Glad he kept his spirit of adventure and obviously his sense of humor from the writing on the photos.

    Liked by 3 people

  14. So interesting to see your dad’s travels in Japan. I was a student in Hiroshima and spent numerous happy times on Miyajima, the sacred island near the city. I do read Japanese and was intrigued by your curiosity around the second hotel in Gamagori. I did a wee bit of snooping and there is one hotel called the Classic Hotel that looks to be on or at least very near the site of the old hotel where your dad was, judging by the angle of the view from the balcony out towards a small shrine island (you can tell by the torii gate at the far end of the footbridge that leads out to it). The interior photos of the hotel lead me to believe that it is in fact the selfsame establishment! Take a look at this link, and be sure to look at it in satellite view to judge the island/footbridge connection. https://www.google.com/maps/place/Gamagori+Classic+Hotel/@34.8146423,137.2284047,3536m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m18!1m9!2m8!1sHotels!3m6!1sHotels!2sGamagori,+Aichi,+Japan!3s0x6004c72269565b9d:0x9147f2ae0439082f!4m2!1d137.2197862!2d34.8259551!3m7!1s0x6004c71f1b063675:0x9e5a3ad8731c513e!5m2!4m1!1i2!8m2!3d34.8158288!4d137.2359435 Then click on the Classic Hotel link!

    Liked by 3 people

  15. Fascinating as always. Thanks.

    Liked by 3 people

  16. So exciting to see these old brochures from such a distant country. Funny how the Japanese text is written vertically

    Liked by 3 people

    • There was so much unknown about Japan until people like MacArthur, who understood her, helped to teach us. My father remembered quite a bit from the lectures his superiors gave the unit.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Good to retrace his steps, GP

    Liked by 3 people

  18. I like that. What a great way to remember. Now we have pictures that get buried among hundreds of others!

    Liked by 3 people

  19. Thank you for this, GP. A super view of Smitty’s stay in Japan.

    Liked by 3 people

  20. These photos and brochures must truly be treasures, which your dad brought home from Japan. Perhaps your Japanese blogging friend might help you with the translation. I like Smitty’s photo taken in New Guinea. Have a great start of the week, GP!

    Liked by 3 people

    • I’m not sure how everyone else feels about these brochures, but I sure feel like they’re treasures, Peter!! I will be getting touch with Koji to ask him.
      Thanks for dropping in, Peter, always a pleasure!!

      Liked by 1 person

  21. Thanks for another enjoyable post – and especially for including the Beetle Bailey cartoons! Thumbs up! 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  22. Hooray for Smitty! Love his stories.

    Liked by 3 people

  23. Love this post! Nice to have these souvenirs from Smitty’s stay in Japan. I smiled when I saw the pagoda with the deer. I have a pagoda about 40″ in front of my house which looks like a small version of that pagoda and last winter, I bought two big lighted reindeers and placed them next to my pagoda. I enjoy reading Beetle Bailey!

    Liked by 3 people

  24. The brochure looks great, GP! However I cant imagine real holidays under the given circumstances. 😉 Best wishes, Michael
    Btw. Give a note to the DoD, the European satellite navigation system Galileo is down ince three days. We need GPS back. Lol

    Liked by 3 people

  25. I love this post, GP. My family picks on me all the time for collecting brochures. I’m glad to see that he brought these home and you saved them to share with us. I’m amazed that so many things actually looked good in 1945.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Our bombings were concentrated around the big cities, I suppose these places were by-passed. Don’t throw those brochures away Dan. I wish I still had the ones I collected from our travels when I was a kid!!!

      Liked by 1 person

  26. Would enjoy reading the translation.

    Liked by 3 people

  27. I love B Bailey!! He is such a hoot!! Smitty is really great!!😃

    Liked by 3 people

  28. Kilroy was everywhere! Looks like Smitty got around pretty well too. Great post!

    Always loved Beetle Bailey cartoons! Used to buy the books as a kid and read them in the Newspaper funnies. 🇺🇸

    Liked by 3 people

  29. As soon as I saw the title, Smitty was here, I thought of Kilroy was here and at the bottom, there was Kilroy. This was a fun read. Makes me wonder if most of us had a little less, we might enjoy things a little more. For many of us, our sense of entitlement is off the charts.

    Liked by 3 people

  30. So great you have all those personal items and comments. Love the Beetle Bailey cartoons, too!

    Liked by 3 people

  31. Such great mementos for you to still have, GP. Smitty made the very best out of being in the occupation forces, that’s plain to see. 🙂
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 3 people

  32. Rice ladles offered by worshipers?

    Liked by 3 people

    • Their offerings are to the gods. The shrine is dedicated to 3 daughters and in fact, the entire island itself was believed to be a God. It’s an interesting story if you care to look into it.

      Like

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