East and West (2)

 

The caption should read, "Tenno HEIKA banzai"

The caption should read, “Tenno HEIKA banzai”

Caption correction of the shout is courtesy of Mustang Koji who can be found HERE!!

Click photo to read caption.

On 18 February 1931, the League of Nations, with America in the lead, issued the “Nonrecognition Doctrine” which pushed Japan’s anger even further.  [ to read what is also known as the Stimson Doctrine – click HERE!!   US Ambassador Joseph Grew in Tokyo persisted in his warnings against this action.  But, even the in-coming president [FDR] and Secretary of State, Cornell Hull argued for the status quo.

Ambassador Joseph Grew, 1939

Ambassador Joseph Grew, 1939

Stimson w/ the Doctrine, 1939

Stimson w/ the Doctrine, 1939

In 1936, FDR and his drive for naval appropriations caused 50,000 veterans to stage a March for Peace in front of the White House.  Children were organized under a banner of “Money for schools, not battleships.”  Privately, FDR raged about isolationists and pacifists as early as 1937 when he held a rally in Chicago in the attempt to gain support to “quarantine” Japan.  The Japanese quest to become a major world power became their primary goal.

In 1939, FDR sent $25 million to the Chunking government to carry on their war with Japan; while Britain told Australia and New Zealand not to worry – the US would not remain indifferent to the Japanese threat in the Far East.  The Australian Prime Minister told the Canberra Parliament, “What Great Britain calls the Far East is to us the Near North.”  Richard Casey met with the British Foreign Office and was told, “the defense of the territories in the Pacific would be determined by the needs in Europe” – they were virtually being abandoned.

FDR campaigning in Warms Springs, GA, 4 April 1939

FDR campaigning in Warms Springs, GA, 4 April 1939

By January 1940, Churchill was cabling FDR daily for more aircraft and supplies to help Britain keep good its promise, “We shall never surrender;” under the Lend Lease Program, [which was being stretched beyond its legal limits more and more each day].  Japan’s growing power was being ignored.  What was commonly misunderstood by Western cultures was that the Japanese Army and Navy Ministries were part of the governmental structure and the military was gaining power each day.

The British interwar plans for a conflict with Japan as early as 1940 depended entirely on the US.  The American plans named “Orange” envisioned a trans-Pacific projection of US power, with Manila serving as a base of operations in the Far East.  But, by 1941, “Plan Dog” foresaw the Atlantic as the offensive and the Pacific in a defensive state.

Japan's Second Cabinet, early 1940

Japan’s Second Cabinet, early 1940

By 1941, the regular cabinet members of the Japanese gov’t were on a need-to-know basis and entire civilian cabinets were forced to resign as the war drew closer.  Japan’s signing of the Tripartite Pact on 27 September 1940 with Germany and Italy, [was to Japan], a trade agreement, plus a way to keep Russia busy and unable to hinder her while she invaded Indochina.  This was not the view of the West and caused further deterioration of Us/Japanese relations.

In his campaign for an unprecedented third term in office, FDR spouted in Boston, MA, “I give you one more assurance.  I have said it before, but I shall say it again and again and again:  Your boys are NOT going to be sent to any foreign war.”  (As we all know now – that was merely a hollow political promise.).

To be continued…..

Click on images to enlarge.

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A View of the homefront – 1939 

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 Political Cartoon of the times – 

Neutrality%20Act

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Robert “Eggs” Avington – St. Petersburg, FL; US Army (Ret.), Korea, Distinguished Service Cross, Purple Heart

Thomas Cushing – Hopkinton, NH; US Army, WWII, PTOimg_96953714425802

Marjorie Effinger – Atwater, CA; US Army, nurse, PTO

Thomas Groom – Christchurch, NZ; RNZ Army# 19274, WWII

Patrick Holland – Halifax, Can; RC Navy, RC Army, RC Air Force, Major (Ret. 42 years) 3rd Clasp to the Canadian Decoration

William McFatter – Vernon, FL; US Army, WWII, ETO, Purple Heart

Robert McCurley – Springfield, IL; US Army Air Corps, WWII, POW

Melvin Shubert – NY & Lake Worth, FL; US Navy, WWII, Medical Corps

Tedrowe Watkins – Big Fork, Montana; US Marine Corps, WWII

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on July 14, 2014, in WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 80 Comments.

  1. Please let me know if my analysis is correct, it seems that the US started it all… Meaning they invoked the Stimson Doctrine and provided funds to China on its war against Japan. It seems that Japan’s bombing of Pearl Harbor was in retaliation of what the US based on East and West (2) history. I might be wrong but it’s how I read it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Quite a bit of it, yes – though many refuse to believe the evidence. The European countries and then the US took over areas of the Pacific for their resources and when Japan wanted the same thing – the Western nations didn’t feel they deserved it. It is difficult to explain their attitudes by looking back with 21st Century eyes, they were schooled and raised differently back then – an entirely different world.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Love your post.. Thank you for liking my post at http://thefinalcurtain1.wordpress.com – My wife (Twitter: @juliechitwood1) compiled some wonderful letters from the era that speaks to the times – “The World After WW1″… If you have any interest, let her know at @juliechitwood1 on twitter.com. My best wishes to you… You give very interesting information…

    Like

    • Thank you, Billy Ray for your interest and comment. It was my pleasure to stop and read your post, but I’m afraid I do not have a twitter account. Is your wife’s work in printed form?

      Like

  3. Interesting to read after all these years, the actual machinations behind the political moves in war, the Stimpson doctrine for instance, its like a political game of dominoes.
    Emu aka Ian

    Like

  4. [off topic and can be delted if you wish – just ran across a man who published a WWI book called “Lest We Forget”, I know it’s a well-used phrase, but it still threw me for a sec.
    http://steveliddell.co.uk
    hope that works]

    Like

  5. I recently saw a program on the Military channel that explained the Russo-Japanese war…and how awful the Japanese were as they went up against the Chinese…terrible. It made me feel less sympathetic toward our bombing of them. The atrocities the Japanese were responsible for made my head spin as I thought about that.

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    • Yes, even the general public of Japan were shocked to discover the actions of their loved ones. It was as though their actions could be justified as long as they weren’t on Japanese soil; and they had been taught to think of themselves as warriors for the Emperor. Thank you for sharing what you saw on Military channel – Comcast doesn’t give me that station.

      Like

  6. Pierre Lagacé

    Reblogged this on Lest We Forget and commented:
    Post No. 2 of East and West…

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  7. Reminds me of when I taught, working my tail off to keep ahead of the class. It’s a great way to learn, eh? 🙂 –Curt

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  8. “hollow political promise” — some things never change! Great post, GP! I love those old photographs from the 30s.

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  9. Hey great job. When we lived in Japan, we talked to a young man who shared that many of the WWII soldiers did not want to participate, but if they refused, their families would come to harm. I think I’m getting ahead of you. Sorry. But just remembered that conversation.

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    • Oh, very true. War-time had already been going on for them for many years, Manchuria, etc. I wouldn’t be surprised if that young man you spoke to wasn’t talking about a relative of his. Thank you for sharing some of your Japanese info – if you remember anything else, Shelley – hop right in here anywhere…..

      Like

  10. Excellent post! I love the “home front” views!

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  11. I can only imagine Churchill’s fear that America wouldn’t help. Lend-Lease is good, but insufficient.

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    • FDR pushed the Lend Lease program way past its limits and without Congressional approval – he was on the verge of being caught too. (Another fact that makes people believe he needed Japan to attack.) What bothers me, is the British military and politicians had planned for the US to protect their colonies back in 1939 – the Inter-war plans show that clearly. And – The US public majority were isolationists back then.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Actually, all political promises are hollow.
    And We, The Sheeple, never know what’s going on — that’s for the victor’s historians to rewrite retrospectively (as best suits their own current circumstances) afterwards.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Very true. In many of the books and references I have, (as I was saying to Pierre in another post), the author’s opinion is shining through each paragraph. That’s why many of my posts take a while to put together. I don’t even want MY opinion in them, so I have to extract facts, events and movements and cross-reference, etc. If I find too many conflicting personal opinions on somethings – I leave it out all-together!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Different strokes. You are an objective reporter, I try deliberately to provoke debate. Both in the name of Truth …

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        • Yes I am or try my best to be objective. Personal opinions are for the comment section on my site. You and I just have different methods of achieving our goals. Have a good one!

          Like

  13. The information in this post is fascinating, and I love the photos. I believe that a person could read your blog for a year and get an earned college credit in history. BTW, I just ordered The Girls of Atomic City. I can’t wait to finish my “chores” and get into it this evening. Your blog is serving a very valuable purpose. Keep blogging!!!

    Like

    • Thank you very much, Jan. Such praise could very easily go straight to my head!! 🙄 Thank you very much for your kind words, I do my best to comply. Enjoy your book, a lot went on that the public was completely unaware of!

      Like

  14. ps The caption is incorrect. It’s “Tenno HEIKA banzai”. ☺

    Like

  15. Frankly, although he was a popular figure back then, I feel FDR should have been brought up on treason charges. Unfortunately, he died in office as you know. I also strongly believe he orchestrated the start of WWII; FDR and his staff knew where the Japanese Imperial Fleet was through our breaking of Japanese codes and radio triangulation. FDR also followed to the T the points in the McCollum document on how to bring Japan to war.

    Like

    • Koji – you are not alone – many thought exactly the thing. Sit down after your chores and type into your AOL page, Bing or whatever – FDR scandal pages. You will see a site that says, What really happened. Hold on to your hat! (I tried to do the link, but I was obviously doing something wrong.)

      Liked by 1 person

      • Do you know where FDR was when he had his stroke? 🙂 You would have never seen Uncle Ronnie, Grandpa George (#41) or Uncle George (#43) in that socially unacceptable situation… Maybe with #42 you will!

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        • As far as I know, FDR was in Warm Springs, GA on vacation. (The same place as the picture I had of him in 1939 campaigning – he must have liked the place.) The White House quickly reported a stroke, but there is a new book out bringing up a theory – “F.D.R.’s Deadly Secret,” by Dr. Steven Lomzow & journalist Eric Fettmann; they suggest that the facial mole that disappeared from the president’s face could quite possibly have been melanoma that had metastasized into a brain tumor, etc. – who knows?

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  16. Great beginning to what I’m sure will be more great information to come , always well presented . You are right about history , of course , repeating past mistakes , sending the next generation of young men and women out to fight what politicians decide are good causes . Hind sight is 20/20 , of course . Late 30s events were complicated and , we have to admit , no so easily predictable as we might think now . Tell us more !

    Like

    • Thank you for your opinion, Dan, but from the information I’ve located – it was all a foregone conclusion. Another book came last week and the very first word was – “Inevitable.” Too many people had the same ideas of grandeur and glory, their upbringing, in some cases necessity, but all in all…..

      Like

  17. gp, JUST GREAT…………………. MY KIND OF HISTORY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! TR, Wilson, FDR, etc., my subject areas!!!!!!!!!! Phil

    Like

  18. I agree with Frederick Andersen’s comment. It’s that deep background one finds on your blog that makes the time spent worth the effort. Of course, it always is well-written and compelling reading. History isn’t boring!

    Like

    • As long as there isn’t a test on Friday – right? (I used to study like crazy O_o to remember all the dates, etc for the Friday quiz’s!) But thank you very much, Doug for the compliment and my blurry eyes from reading so much) thank you.

      Like

  19. Japan had been at odds with the Chinese and Russians during most of the early twentieth century.

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  20. That tension is clearly palpable in Europe right now… It scares me, I have heard once that no generation would pass without a war:(

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    • They were right – weren’t they! The minute the US walked into the Middle East – I KNEW it was going to be the younger generation’s Vietnam. People called me stupid or misinformed, but we’ve been there an awful long time now – haven’t we.

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      • Oh you were so right. Most of people just don’t want to see these things, don’t wan’t to believe in obvious as if that unbelief can stop things from happening.

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        • Very true – and that’s how the politicians get away with everything – people are looking the other way.

          Liked by 1 person

          • People are looking the other way also because of the media – government marriage making up public opinions that aren’t even “opinions”, let alone “public”.

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            • OH, don’t get me started on the media!!

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              • OK:) I let you go. Just one more thing about your post: I hate that so many good people have died and the world never changed to the better:(

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                • Some people refuse to remember their history and they let it play out all over again. Greed and power are usually to blame, with the civilians being drawn in unknowingly. Have a wonderful day, Mia.

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                • I would disagree that the world has not changed for the better, or at least hope that you would agree that WWII at least stopped it from being far worse.

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                  • It prevented the world from being worse, actually. Stalin’s army was trained to conquer the world; trained for attack, not defence. If Hitler didn’t attack Russia in June 1941, in August Stalin’s army would have flooded Europe.

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                    • Granted – in reality, Stalin was worse than Hilter.

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                    • David Navarre

                      An insane man who attempted to exterminate Jews and other “undesirables” versus an ruthless man who murdered many times more people. Hmmm. Saying one was worse than the other is not particularly meaningful.

                      My point is that many wars have actually made the world a better place than if they had not occurred, despite the tremendous cost in lives and damage.

                      There is a popular bumper sticker that says: ‘Except for ending slavery, fascism, Nazism, and Communism, war has never solved anything.’

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                    • Those things do still exist today, just in other forms. Wars kill our best and strongest, ultimately the human race will only have the weak and sickly to breed – how does that solve any of our problems? Power and greed will always win out – no matter what name we give it.

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                    • I love that bumper sticker of yours.

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  21. I really enjoyed the photos. They add another element to the perspective. I never knew the FDR had made that statement. It’s good to see that it’s not just modern politicians who make empty promises.

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  22. Pierre Lagacé

    Love the slideshow… and all the rest.

    About this…

    In 1939, FDR sent $25 million to the Chunking government to carry on their war with Japan; while Britain told Australia and New Zealand not to worry – the US would not remain indifferent to the Japanese threat in the Far East. The Australian Prime Minister told the Canberra Parliament, “What Great Britain calls the Far East is to us the Near North.” Richard Casey met with the British Foreign Office and was told, “the defense of the territories in the Pacific would be determined by the needs in Europe” – they were virtually being abandoned.

    Australia was in deep trouble when she realized she was not a priority for the defense of the British Empire.

    Like

  23. Great selection of photos showing the world as it was in 1939. Almost makes me what to shout, ” Watch out, watch out, don’t you know what’s coming?”

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    • I know what you mean, I had the same reaction as I went searching for these. Some were from an old magazine I located at a yard sale and that’s what gave me the idea.

      Like

  24. Thank you. I have never studied the build up of tensions in the east as a prelude to the war, so much of this is a revelation. Thank you for the work. I’m hooked!

    Like

    • I’m thrilled to hear that I am actually serving a purpose here. These prelude posts took a lot of work to slim down being that I found so much information – the reason the Intermission Stories went so long, I had books and print-outs to try and digest. Thank you very much, Frederick.

      Liked by 3 people

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