Korean War (44)

187th RCT returns to Korea

187th RCT returns to Korea

 

19 June, the 187th Airborne RCT (Regimental Combat Team) were ordered back to their Japanese base and to prepare for their third tour in Korea along with the 34th RCT from the 24th Division.   Their destination was to be sent outside Seoul.  The 674th Parachute Field Artillery Battalion also went to the front line, east of Chorwon Valley.  The truce talks halted due to the POW camp breakouts caused by Rhee.

674th Parachute Field Artillery Battalion

674th Parachute Field Artillery Battalion

20 June, nine enemy propeller aircraft bombed Seoul close enough to shake President Rhee’s residence.  This action killed two and injured 8 people.

23 June, Chinese communist troops from the Haeju area invaded Yongmae-do island held only be a small friendly garrison.  The HMAS Culgoa (k-408), evacuated the forces.  Two days later the CCF withdrew and the evacuees returned.

HMAS Culgoa

HMAS Culgoa

25 June, the Korean War entered its fourth year.  The 7th Marines were put on alert status when strong enemy probes struck in the sector of the 1st ROK Division of I Corps.

Task Force 77 deployed four F4U-5N Vought Corsair aircraft to the 5th Air Force because of repeated night attacks on Seoul by what was believed to be of the PO-2 type.  The 5th Air Force previously had not possessed propeller driven night fighters.

F4U-5 at Kimpo, Korea

F4U-5 at Kimpo, Korea

30 June, a night pilot from the USS Princeton, on TAD (temporary additional duty) at Kimpo  airfield, proved that the F4U-5N’s could effectively defend Seoul against the enemy’s slow propeller plane bight attacks by shooting down two of their YAK-18s.

Yak-18

Yak-18

Marine Aircraft Group 12 (Sgt. James O’Leary, my uncle, was with this unit) flew a record breaking 217 combat sorties and dropped an all-time high of 340 tons of bombs and napalm on the enemy.  American Navy and Marine pilots racked up 9,238 sorties during the month of June.  In addition to this, the British Navy pilots flew 864 sorties.

Click on images to enlarge.

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Farewell Salutes – 

Robert Burke, Sr. – Charlottesville, VA; US Army, Colonel (Ret.)

Earl Capper – Chicago, IL; US Army, WWII

Gino Cicchetti – Sarasota, FL & Trenton, NJ; US Navy, WWII

Marine in Korea w/ kitten, courtesy of NJBiblio.com

Marine in Korea w/ kitten, courtesy of NJBiblio.com

 

David Denyer – Christchurch, NZ; Trewhitt Regiment RNZAF # 71769, Ft. Lt.

Adam Filipek – Evanston, IL; US Navy, WWII, PTO, USS Missouri

William Peters Jordon – Toronto, Canada; RCN, WWII

Thomas Pawlowski – Chicago, IL; US Navy, Korea, submarine service on: Queen Fish, Carp & Sea Fox

Edward George Sawyer – Christchurch, NZ; RAF Squadrons 203, 345, 230, Service # 1320219

Roger Weaver – Pittsburgh, PA & Ft. Lauderdale, FL; US Air Force, Korea

John Zaremski – Chicago, IL; US Army, WWII

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on February 15, 2014, in Korean War and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 40 Comments.

  1. Was that the closest they came to Seoul and the presidents quarters ?
    Interesting reading of the fourth year of the Korean conflict.
    Makes one wonder on the military might that North Korea has in the present day.
    Regards
    Emu

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    • As far as I know, yes it is the closest, as the war will be over shortly. I don’t even want to think about today’s N.K., especially if they have China behind them again. We’ve been so busy in the Middle East and our military has had drastic cutbacks – who would fight?

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  2. Amazing. I love American ingenuity (I’m thinking of the night pilot that downed the YAK 18s). I just finished a book about Gene Fluckey and the revolutionary things he did with subs. Nothing to do with Korea–I know–just interesting.

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  3. The Corsair was a powerful workhorse applying aerodynamics that were newly explored in aviation in the time of it’s development.

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  4. Love the photo of the Marine and the kitten! That he would take such care is a testament to him as a human!

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    • I put that in to remind everyone of that fact. When I keep talking about the troops or the forces, etc. they seem to lose individuality. Thanks for checking it out.

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  5. I have always liked the look of the Corsair .

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  6. Wow – 217 sorties. I don’t fly, so I can only imagine how much effort is required to fly a combat mission.

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  7. I don’t know about you but I would have been scared _hitless if I piloted the venerable Corsair in darkness as a fighter pilot… To me, it would be almost like scuba diving at night.

    I wonder if that Marine was an officer and if he made it home…

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  8. I love the photo of the marine with the kitten. What a tender moment in the midst of war.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Omigosh, that’s amazing what your uncle did. And the number of bombs and napalm is mind-boggling.

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  10. GP, I hope your readers take time to enlarge the photo of the marine feeding the kitten. It speaks deeply to the human side of war. –Curt

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Once more you add to this old fool’s education – thank you.

    Like

  12. Your blog is very important! To understand present and to make right decisions today it is mandatory to know history. It is also important to remember all those who fought for peace and freedom! Thank you.

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    • My pleasure, JF. Since so many of us never learned much about this war in school it hard for younger people to understand the veterans. That’s part of my purpose here. Thank you very much for coming by and reading.

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  13. another interesting post , great pics !

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  14. Just a suggestion…

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  15. Sgt. James O’Leary, my uncle, was with this unit

    He deserves his own blog!

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    • I have his basic records, but very little else. He was with this unit in Korea, but he moved around so much during his career, it is difficult to get specifics. If I ever find out what my late aunt did with all his stuff – there just might be another blog.

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  16. The Yak-18 almost looks comical with its red nose. Interesting post, as always, I learn something new from you.

    Like

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