A Story of WWII from My Father

Andrew has a story from his father!!

Andrew's View of the Week

My father was a great story-teller.  He had a story for every occasion and could enthrall an audience with his wit and humor.  His memory and stories often come to my mind this time of year with memorial day just past and the anniversary of the WWII D-Day invasion just coming up this next week on the 6th.  He could take the simplest event and spin an engaging story about it – often with a punch line.  The story always had a point, either humor or something he was trying to teach.

When I was a boy I especially liked his Army stories.  Father served in WWII as a radar maintenance man in the 279th Army Coast Artillery Corp in the Aleutian Islands.  He repaired and operated the SRC-296 gun sighting radar and later the SCR-584.  He served time on different islands but most often talked about Attu. Shemya and…

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on January 23, 2016, in First-hand Accounts, Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 56 Comments.

  1. I still enjoy documentary films about these times as well all the novels (God Is My Co-Pilot, Reach For The Sky) I have read growing up. Thank you for this shared posting. I appreciate all great storytelling.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. My father (retired Navy) would become irritated at my anti-enthusiasm. He’d say, with frustration, “do you think anyone is pro-war?”
    But yes, he stepped up to the call.
    What a story! Glad your father shared it … ominous as it was

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  3. The Twentysomething Social Recluse

    Great story! Thank you to both you and Andrew for sharing this story with us.

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  4. Fortunately your father was willing and able to shate his stories from his combat in theater. My father kept all his stories hidden.

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  5. I wish I would have recorded and written down my father’s WWII stories about the Philippines.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. That was a nice read! My grandfather and father would never talk about the was, about the military, but never about the war. Only comment that came close was “well, I made it home” when I asked.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Andrew was fortunate to have a father that wanted to share his experiences through stories that would teach him valuable lessons.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. What a great legacy and rich bed of insight your father’s stories must provide.

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  9. Great article from Andrew. I follow his blog–and am becoming a virtual woodworker. Who would have thought?

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    • I believe we all have hidden talents we never imagined ourselves to have. We all have different sides to our personalities – so why not our abilities! I’m proud of you, Jacqui! (do I sense another blog in your future?)

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  10. An amusing tale indeed, GP. I am reminded of Catch 22. I suspect that I might have been asking questions much earlier in the briefing… 🙂 –Curt

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  11. That’s a great story. I’m glad his father was willing to share stories w/ his family when they were growing up.

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  12. Very interesting story and glad that you re-blogged it!

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  13. Thanks for remembering this one!

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  14. A nice personal reflection on some of the absurdities of war. Thanks, GP.
    Best wishes, Pete.

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  15. hello gp cox its dennis the vizsla dog hay my dadas dada just sent my dada a pikcher of sum kartoons wot he had in his lokker wen he wuz in the army!!! of korse that wuz after world war too so it duz not kownt as a war storry but stil! ok bye

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    • If you have those cartoons in a post, please send a link – I’d love to see them. I’ve used cartoon s that were after the war – so I might use them if you agree.

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      • hello gp cox its dennis the vizsla dog hay i askd my dada and he askd his dada and he sed it wood be okay to send the cartoons i do not hav the pikcher in a post tho can i email them to yoo at the address yoo yooze for kommenting on my blog??? ok bye

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        • Sorry, Dennis, I have a rule about answering personal emails [long story there], but as you can see, I do reblog or can save them from your website.

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          • hello gp cox its dennis the vizsla dog hay no wurreez then!!! i had dada upload the pikcher to my blog its at https://dennisthevizsla.files.wordpress.com/2016/01/img020.jpg yoo can pick it up frum their!!! my dadas dada sez the kartoon on the left wuz cut owt of a greeting card and the kartoon on the rite wuz sumbuddy he kalld “the short timer” let me no if yoo want me to ask him for mor informayshun abowt them!!! ok bye

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            • Thank you, Dennis. A story about them might be good. Where did your grandfather serve for one?

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              • hello gp cox its dennis the vizsla dog hay heer is wot my dadas dada sed abowt the pikchers!!! i am kwoting heer so sorry abowt the lak of proper mispelling and all the ekstra punktchooayshun!!! the army yoozed him as a soshul wurker as that wuz wot he wuz traynd for in sivilyan life!!! the auntie referensd is of korse my dadas aunt and my grayt aunt she is always gud to hit up for treets wen she vizzits!!! ok bye

                “I think Auntie (she wasn’t ‘Auntie’ then, of course) sent me the ‘Keep Smiling’ card. I got shipped to Crailsheim Germany because the Rehab Center needed two social workers, but six months later they closed it and I got reassigned to a hospital in Muenchweiler. They had no active psych. unit so I ran the PA system, paging people, and reading lots of books.”

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                • Thank you for relating the story. This way I can explain the cards when I use them. Thank you very much for serving and helping the wounded vets come home with a smile.

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  16. I don’t know anyone who was actually in combat who isn’t at his or her core, anti-war. The story was well written; I could almost hear the story being told. Thank you …

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