Intelligence

 

The Dozier Family in Japan, circa 1920's

The Dozier Family in Japan, circa 1920’s

The Japanese altered their pre-war message codes after the Coral Sea (6 May 1942), and a few weeks before the Aleutians and Midway ( June 1942).  The changes were enough to send US Naval Intelligence in Honolulu scrambling.

The Secret Service brought in a well-known Southern Baptist missionary who had recently arrived in Hawaii after being booted out of Japan along with the other undesirable westerners.  Reverend Edwin Burke Dozier, who became part of the Olivet Baptist Church in Honolulu, was the son of S.B.C. missionaries from Georgia.  He had been born and raised in Japan – the Nagasaki-Fukuoka area of Kyushu’s west coast.

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Rev. Dozier’s masterful ear for the Japanese language discerned that the enemy was using Japanese baby-talk in the key parts of their altered code.  These were not words found in any dictionary and a person would have had to been raised from birth in a Japanese home to know them.

Dozier helped to break the new code, and later, he was called upon frequently to evaluate O.N.I. reports and guide the code breakers in nuances in Japanese thought that steered their code formations.  All the data was then sent on to Washington D.C.

ONI seal

ONI seal

On numerous occasions through and after the war he was offered high commissions in both the military and governmental intelligence services; all of which he refused.  Dozier believed his calling in life was to preach the Gospel to the Japanese people.

When G-2 BGeneral Henry Muller Jr. was informed about these developments from Matt Underwood, Editor of “The Voice of the Angels” 11th A/B Division Assn., he was fascinated.  Muller considered it to be no real surprise that an enemy as formidable and resourceful as the Japanese could come up with their own version of Navajo codetalkers by speaking a sort of language not found in any dictionary.

"Edwin Dozier In Japan"

“Edwin Dozier In Japan”

Rev. Dozier’s account is mentioned in his biography, “Edwin Dozier of Japan: Man of the Way,” by Lois Whaley, Women’s Missionary Union, 1983.  This data was published in the “Voice of the Angels,” 11th A/B Div. Assn., Vol. 185, December 2014.

Judy Hardy at – Greatest Generation Lessons and I are attempting to coordinate our websites.  As I post about June 1942 and the activity in the Aleutian Islands, she will be posting letters and home front stories that correspond.  Judy had her Uncle Ced in Alaska at this time along with a family friend, Rusty.

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Military Humor –  what have they been saying?

Join The Army!

Join The Army!

 

 

Concealed - from Chris at Muscleheaded

Concealed – from Chris at Muscleheaded

 

 

 

 

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Anthony Angerosa – Fishkill, NY; US Army, WWII, ETO, Purple Heart, Bronze Star

Turi Blake – Taranaki, NZ; RNZ Navy # 621648, WWII

Gunther Ditzel – Carlsbad, CA; US Army Air Corps, WWII260637844_god_bless_them_all_xlarge

William Fay Jr. – Delray Beach, FL; US Navy, WWII, pilot

Donald Huard – Augusta, ME; US Army, WWII, PTO, 161st Infantry Reg/25th Infantry Div.

Harry Karas Jr. – Yakima, WA; US Army, Navy & Air Force, Korea, Vietnam, (Ret. 30 Years)

J.W. Landry Jr. – Crowley, LA; US Army, WWII, ETO, Bronze Star

Virginia Powers – Lansing, MI; USMC, Sgt. (Ret.)

Daniel Quinlin – Columbus, GA; US Army, Colonel (Ret. 33 years)

Raymond Sinclair – UK & CAN; British Army, WWII, ETO

Stella Uhorczuk – Alexandria, VA; WIMSA (USMC), WWII, (Ret. 30 years government service)

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on January 29, 2015, in Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 109 Comments.

  1. Wonderful job on summarizing the story of Dozier. He was indeed critical to the successes with JN-25. Too bad the USN didn’t want Nisei’s like my Dad! 🙂

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  2. My dad was in Army intelligence in the Pacific, particularly in the Philippines. He was often behind enemy lines as the lines shifted so much. I have a machete from his time there.

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    • Do you happen to know what unit he was in, Nike? There are a few of us who also had relatives in the Philippines, we might be able to match up some timelines. It’s amazing how much those men could endure, isn’t it?!

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  3. TOO cool. I knew (but marginally) about code breakers and how they saved us years in the world war but THIS is something. Japanese baby talk! The things I learn here.

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  4. A brilliant comprehension of decoding by Edwin Dozier.
    Another link to another book I intend to read.
    Cheers

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  5. Great article…enjoyed!

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  6. Haven’t been here in a while . . . spent a bit of time poking around. Still as interesting as ever.

    Thanks for the posts.

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  7. Baby talk! Fascinating! I admire cryptographers and their language skills.

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  8. Fascinating, GP. Baby talk. That took imagination. Also, the privates bit is quite humorous. Wonder how long that ad campaign lasted. 🙂 –Curt

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  9. Have you seen this?? http://voxvocispublicus.homestead.com/morrow.html
    Called the flight of the Old 666

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    • No, I had not seen it the video although I had heard of the amazing Flying Fortress and her crew. I’ll save this link for the Solomon campaigns. Thank you very much, Bob for contributing and remaining a part of this project.

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  10. An intriguing story, many thanks. It would be interesting to know what the Japanese thought Navajo was.

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  11. Baby talk? wow– that was a neat trick.

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  12. I’d also never heard of it before. That’s ingenious certainly.

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  13. Fascinating history. Codes are intriguing, as are those who are clever enough to break them.

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  14. People of that calibre were worth a regiment or two or even a a couple of battle fleets, their war effort was incalculable and the number of lives saved through their silent effort are countless.

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    • Very true Beari and this one didn’t even want fame or thanks after the war – just went about his true calling. It was like pulling teeth to even find a picture of him! [maybe I need more spy training?]

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  15. Reblogged this on The Missal.

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  16. What a wonderful twist of fate bringing these elements together.

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  17. Very interesting. This technique does not need any encryption that involving keeping key secrets.

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  18. Catherine McEwen

    Amazing and interesting!

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  19. I had not heard of that before, Japanese baby talk being used as code. Thank you for the education!

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  20. I’ve never heard of this either . It doesn’t seem to be common knowledge in reading WWII history . Great discovery !

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  21. Interesting post G.! I didn’t know about this japanese code. Thanks! 🙂

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  22. Rev. Dozier’s help sure made a huge difference with the code. Very interesting story. Also loved the military humor with the mufti-tasking 🙂

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  23. PS i chuckled at the ‘Army likes our privates’ poster. Exceptionally timely with all the brou-ha over deflate gate and Patriot balls 😊

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  24. Fascinating story and photos with the women in kimonos. Code talkers is certainly one of the more intriguing elements of that war. What a contrasting world and probably some moral dilemmas for a missionary during wartimes.

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  25. Interesting stuff, isn’t it? You bring to light the behind the scenes intelligence during the war. The USN and USMC refused to use men like my dad; instead, they only used Caucasians who had spent part of their life in Japan. There weren’t too many of them but they gave their all. One man, Capt. Holtom, was killed on Making Island during the raid.

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  26. Great story! And I love the cartoons , too.

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  27. A fascinating story indeed. I watched a film last night about the mathematician Alan Turing and his Enigma Machine.

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  28. Another unsung hero–never strayed from his beliefs and calling.

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  29. A fascinating subject and good to read about the mostly unknown Dozier contribution in the war efforts.

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  30. Very interesting. I had never heard about this before.

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  31. That’s a fascinating story. And a very lucky break for the Americans finding Mr Dozier.

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  32. The complexity of the Japanese language has long intrigued me. I’d forgotten about the “baby talk” aspect, too. Of course Japanese is quite complicated enough, without taking into consideration “baby talk”.

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  33. Fascinating…I guess the Japs really made a mistake in kicking him out of the country. 😉

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  34. Reblogged this on A Conservative Christian Man.

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  35. Code and code breaking are a favorite subject of mine to read about. in 2013, I was in London and I took the train out to Bletchley Park. It was the tourist attraction I wanted to see most. I had never heard this story, so chalk up another one 🙂 Back in the late ’70s I worked with a man who had been in the Army Cryptographers Corp during the Korean War. One of the things he talked about was the degree to which they protected him and the other members of the team. He was once flown out of a dangerous area on a plane with MacArthur. He said the downside to the security was that he served most of his duty in windowless concrete rooms.

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  36. Great story. I’ve read several analyses of the Enigma machine and such but have not seen much on Japanese codes and its developers. Thanks.

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  37. Little unknown bit of history.
    Fascinating!

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  38. That’s a fascinating and not frequently mentioned piece of history.

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  39. The language aspect of this is fascinating

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