Intermission Stories (4)

Korean War Veterans Memorial Wall, Washington D.C.

Korean War Veterans Memorial Wall, Washington D.C.

There are beautiful memorials to the Korean War veterans all around this world of ours, the following is the memorial poem at the Liberty State Park.  Fellow blogger, Gallivanta, was kind enough to submit these sentiments for this site.  It would be wonderful if readers would take the time to see her site as well, it can be found HERE.

 
Liberty Park statue for Korean War veterans

Liberty Park statue for Korean War veterans

 
We didn’t do much talking,
We didn’t raise a fuss.
But Korea really happened,
So please – remember us.
 
We all just did our duty,
But we didn’t win or lose.
A victory was denied us,
But we didn’t get to chose.
 
We all roasted in the summer,
In winter, we damn near froze.
Walking back from near the Yalu,
With our blackened frozen toes.
 
Like the surf the Chinese kept coming,
With their bugles in the night.
We fired into their masses,
Praying for the morning light. 
 
All of us just had to be there,
And so many of us died.
But now we’re all but half forgotten,
No one remembers how we tried.
 
We grow fewer with the years now,
And we still don’t raise a fuss.
But Korea really happened,
So please – remember us.
 
Liberty Park statue for Korean War veterans

Liberty Park statue for Korean War veterans

Click on images to enlarge.

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I know how much eye witness accounts and the Farewell Salutes mean to the readers of this site, therefore I wish to introduce you to Jacqui Murray, should you not already be acquainted.  Her site is USNA or Bust and every Wednesday she posts the Wednesday Hero.  I thought you might enjoy having a link to go take a peek at the wonderful veterans she has honored.  Located here.

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A WWII Update – 

Please click to enlarge this powerful story from The Week magazine…

001 (786x800)

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Farewell Salutes – 

Brandon Tyler Bennett (20) – Lewisville, Tx; Texas Army National Guard, 176th Engineer Brigade

Russell A. Bertram – Toronto, Canada; Royal Can. Army Medical Corps Band, WWII

The Missing Man formation

The Missing Man formation

Walter G. Bruhl, Jr. – Newark, NJ & Dewey Beach, DE; USMC, Sgt., Korea

Sammy Countryman – Roger, AR; Us Army, Korea, Helicopter instructor during Vietnam

John Lewis Chambers – Lantana, FL; US Air Force, Korea

Francis Flynn – Sun Lakes, AZ; US Army Air Corps, WWII, pilot

LeRoy “Peanuts” Holmberg – Cloquet, MN & Boca Raton, FL; US Army, WWII

Damiel Murphy – Pearl River, NY; US Army, WWII

Malcolm A. Newton – North Island, NZ; RNZN #18141

Edward K. Steffen – Ahwatukee, AZ; US Navy, Vietnam

John Theus – Jacksonville, FL; US Army Air Corps, Col. WWII, US “Flying Tigers”, PTO

Ernest Tollerson, jr. – Washington, DC; US Army, Pvt., WWII / Lt.Col., Korea & Reserves

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on March 20, 2014, in Korean War, Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 64 Comments.

  1. A great post all round, the memorials and the poem, a great legacy.
    The story of LT Lee gives an insight into the type of Marine that America is proud of.
    Ian

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  2. It was indeed, and I was glad to read about hero Lee too.

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  3. I’ve never been to DC but when I go I must visit their memorial – it is beautiful!

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  4. I’ve seen pictures of the Korean War Veterans Memorial Wall in D.C. It’s certaimly a beautiful tribute.

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  5. sue marquis bishop

    Thank you for sharing these very special stories. Sue

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  6. The statues and the poem are wonderful. But that article on Major Lee brought tears to my eyes. Another true hero!

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  7. Our cadre in basic training was made up of Korean veterans and they were dedicated men. Yes, I will remember!!

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  8. It’s so true that the schools hardly mention it. My father was suppose to go to Korea but they kept him in Germany instead. That is such a wonderful poem also. Sums it up real well!

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  9. An excellent reminder!!

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  10. Great article on Lee, and a great reminder that American’s come from all ethnic backgrounds. –Curt

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  11. Thank you! I hadn’t seen much from you lately but this was worth waiting for.

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  12. I have not been to Washington for a good long while, and had not seen the Korean memorial Wall, or I am not remembering it. I remember the statues, and have photos of them, but not the wall.

    Also, Mr. Lee’s exploits were impressive.

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  13. I previously wrote about Major Lee; although I never met him, his passing touches me personally. He was, according to Major General Ray Davis, “The bravest Marine I ever knew.”

    Rest in peace, Major Lee. Semper Fidelis …

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  14. The first time I saw the Korean War memorial in Washington was on a cold December night. The second time was during the day in the summer. The impact of seeing the statues light from underneath with the light snowfall heighten the emotion and for me gave more of a feeling of what these men must have endured for their country.

    I recommend seeing the memorials in Washington during the winter and at night. And try to remember the cold lonely nights those who served endured.

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    • Excellent advice and sentiment, Andrew. If you weren’t such a master with carpentry, I’d say you should be a writer. Thank you for your comment and for taking the time to come here today.

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  15. We should never sacrifice our men and women without remembering them.

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  16. Enjoyed reading the poem and what an inspiring story about Lt Lee!

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  17. Strength and glory can be found in sadness, too – the poem is so well focused on important issues

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    • Yes, it is Ina. That is the very reason I appreciated Gallivanta’s submission of it so much. Thank you for reading it.

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      • I enjoyed reading it as I do all your posts gpcox, as you can imagine when it comes to wars and history and political intrigue I am like a sponge 😀 I do not often get time to comment but at least I can “Like” and you know it’s genuine 🙂 Cheers!

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  18. Thanks for the poem and the link.

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  19. That’s a great capture of the Korean War Memorial. I found it very difficult to get a good shot because of the etchings. You could only see people at certain angles. Now, looking back…maybe they did that on purpose…as a symbol of the forgotten.

    Love the story of Lee.

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  20. Lee was fearless–I mean to go to Viet Nam after all that happened to him prior is unbelievable. It si too bad we do not get more documentaries and news stories on these real heroes rather than glorifying the same celebs and superstars over and over again.

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  21. Thanks again for keeping this in our minds. I’ve known many people who served in Korea and their stories convinced me that it was real.

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  22. For peace to flourish, flesh and blood has to rejuvenate the land – our earth demands nothing less, it would seem.

    The story of Kurt Chew parallels the lives of many trail blazers – be they African American, Native Indian, Japanese, and so forth.

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  23. Wonderful memorials – especially so the top one. Also I like the way simple verse is used in war (WW1 another fine example) poetry – the verse of the common man, wonderful! My father still had the vestiges of black, frost bitten toes until the day he died.

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    • Once we know what they did over there, I find it inexcusable for them to be forgotten or brushed over by the school systems that taught us nothing about it. Thanks for reading today, Mike.

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