Korean War (24)

1952

F-86 aircraft in Korea

F-86 aircraft in Korea

1 January, with the new year, the 1st Marine Division continued to occupy and defend their sector, but 2 bombs managed to be dropped on Kimpo airfield and damaged 16 wing-tip tanks (used for in-flight refueling) and a F-86.  The approximate position of the Korean battle line was about 5 miles south-east of Kosong on the east coast to 10 miles southeast of Kaesong in the west.  This was the 319th consecutive day of naval bombardment at Wonsan.

The Fast Carrier Task Force – 77 carried out Operation Moonlight Sonata, which took advantage of the full moon to inflict air strikes on enemy trains.  Five 2-plane groups traveled over 50 mile stretches of railroad tracks to stop enemy locomotives and locate others for future attacks.

Soviet-made Yak-9

Soviet-made Yak-9

4 January, the FEAF (Far East Air Force) reported that 100 to 150 Yak-9 fighter planes were spotted near the front lines at 0301 hours.  This was the first time enemy propeller planes were seen in such strength near the front and this indicated they were beefing up their ability to make night attacks.  The 1st Corps was reporting attacks on their left flank on Kimpo Peninsula coming from Kangwha Island.  Cruisers were ordered to move in and give support.  The HMS Belfast was at the entrance of the Han River and radioed that other ships should move into that position.

6 January, the 8th Army was relieved from ground defense of the islands on the east and west coasts (north of the 38th), where special Air Force equipment was based; it would now be under CTF-95 (Commander of Task Force – 95).  The Amphibious Redeployment Group (4 APAs, 2 LSDs and 8 LSTs) began an interchanging of the 40th Infantry Division and 24th Division between Yokohama and Inchon.

7th Fleet patch

7th Fleet patch

9 January, a conference was held on the USS Wisconsin to form the West Coast Island Defense Element TE – 95.15 with the headquarters at Paengnyong-do.  The 7th Fleet and the Wisconsin organized Marine detachments capable of defending any of the islands.  Sunwi-do was now controlled by the enemy.  The east coast from Kansong to Sonjin would be swept once every 2 weeks.  The following day, the island of Changnin-do was in enemy hands.

Task Force - 77 patch

Task Force – 77 patch

11 January, MGeneral John T. Seden assumed command of the 1st Marine Division’s Operation Derail went into affect with 11 key railroad targets by air and/or ship.  The USS Gregory and USS Mackenzie had a battle with onshore artillery batteries, hitting the enemy Command Post.  The Thailand ships RTN Prasae and Tachin started in their first escort service with the USS Brisbee.  Ground forces enlisted air support to attack gun crews on the Amgak Peninsula, their targets were hit.

ROK soldiers

ROK soldiers

18 January, the city of Wonsan was, at this point, in its 12th month of bombardment.  The USS Halsey Powell had its own operation called ‘Chicken Stealer.’  She sent her small boat in close to Sam-He to spot targets.  They damaged 18 jetties, filled numerous boats with Scrapnel. completely gutted a warehouse and engaged gun crews.  Three days later, intelligence reported that they were aware of a Soviet submarine in the Chongjin area.

USS "Consulation"

USS “Consolation”

23 January, the North Korean 15th Division was relieved by the 89th and 90th regiments.  Intelligence reports noted that the enemy guerrilla movements were more cautious than usual, but mortar and artillery fire was on the rise.  West coast evacuation of the islands was halted due to the discovery of a typhus outbreak.  The next day, the USS Consolation completed her tests.  This was the only hospital ship equipped with a helicopter pad and the wounded could now be flown from the front lines directly to the ship.  On the east, ROK troops landed to perform attacks on railroads, tunnels and bridges.  By the end of this month, Marine Fighter Squadron 312’s CP was moved back to Itami, Japan.

 

Click on images to enlarge.

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Farewell Salutes –

David Aubrey – Sun City West, AZ; US Army, WWII, ETO, Purple Heart

Bruce Byram – Phoenix, AZ, US Air Force (Ret. after 22 years), MSgt.

Peter Ciadella – Niagara Falls, NY & Scottsdale, AZ; US Navy, USS Enterprise, Vietnam

Purple Heart

Purple Heart

Verlie Eller – Fannin County, GA; US Army, WWII, ETO

Paul Gitter – NYC, NY & Miami, FL; US Army Air Corps, WWII

John Philip Knight – Middletown, OH & Coral Springs, FL; US Army, Korea

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on October 31, 2013, in Korean War, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 36 Comments.

  1. sue marquis bishop

    The photos are amazing to see. Randy enjoyed your post on Korean War. Will share post with Korean vets here. Thanks for checking in on my blog. Sue
    Women livinglifeafter50.com

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  2. After reading your reports, the naval engagements were much more than I even imagined. I can see why Old Man Jack’s wife would have left him if he had re-upped for a third time. 🙂

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  3. I like your blog from the technical point of view. Interesting that the F 86 was finally depending on German design of the Me 262 and as well, the enemy opposite the MiG-15 was designed using developments of German scientists like Adolf Busemann.

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  4. GP – I had reason to drive a helping dog plus around 500 new and current books to a VA therapist that I’ve established a working relationship with in the Ozarks. First, Max, the wonderful loving dog was an instant hit but I was positive he would be. The books, both novels and non-fiction starts a nice library just for the veterans (all living in extreme rural areas), and now they have the added bonus of your blogs. What a wonderful trip. And, so many grateful veterans. Most of these veterans live on nothing but their VA disability as no work exists in this area and many eat off the land – catching wildlife and fishing. I opened up the conversation of possibly starting a food pantry or the possibility of would the veterans come to the clinic a few times a week for meals if they were prepared for them. Many suffer from severe PTSD.

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    • What a wonderful thing for you to do for the veterans! A dog makes a great companion, even if for a short time – I think it’s the contact and unconditional love. I’m still so overwhelmed that they are enjoying the site. Maybe the doctor could add one of their stories here in the comment section; they might enjoy seeing their own tales of service on the internet. And books – don’t get me started – each one is an adventure unto itself and deserves to be taken; you are one terrific person, Sheri.

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  5. Lol. I see Clint Eastwood gets a mention in the comments after my Heartbreak ridge gaffe !!!! I love the insignia’s or patches. Any plans of showing a detailed collection of all patches of different corps etc (for Korea) ?

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  6. There still some of those F-86 Sabres around . I saw one chasing a MiG in an airshow a couple of year ago .

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  7. You are giving such a wonderful look at this war. So many details that I just never knew about.

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  8. I am not sure if it is because I am now more familiar with this war story, but it seems to me that the war campaign is more orderly now than it was at the beginning. Possibly?

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    • It does seem that way, now that you mention it. I think it was scattered in the beginning, because the invasion came as such a surprise.

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    • “orderly” is not quite the word, because there was still plenty of fighting and death, but after about June or July in 1951, the frontline did not move more than a few miles in either direction. Unlike the first year of the war during which the armies swept up and down the peninsula, from the Pusan perimeter to the Yalu River.

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      • Yes, orderly wasn’t quite the right word to choose but I can now see from your explanation why the ‘progress’ of the war seems different to me. Thank you, that was very helpful.

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  9. Superb photos above of F-86 lined-up. Thanks for that link to SAAF photo memories.

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  10. gpcox – Only 1 hospital ship? How could we believe that that would be sufficient ???

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  11. I know this is sort of off point but I read somewhere the Clint Eastwood was drafted in the Korean War.

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    • Yes, in 1951 and entered the US Army, assigned to Fort Ord, CA as a lifeguard. While on leave, he was a passenger on a Douglas AD Bomber which ran out of fuel and crashed into the ocean near Point Reyes. He and the pilot swam 3 miles to safety. _______info thanks to Wiki

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  12. One of my friends is pretty proud of his Korean War Vet dad. He was one of the few Nebraskans chosen to visit the Memorial in D.C. Quite an honor.

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  13. I see they’re flying Korean War veterans to Washington, DC, now, to visit the Korean War memorial. (Can’t remember the organization at the moment- same one that flies WWII veterans to the WWII memorial). Many of these guys fought in both wars, and those who didn’t aren’t much younger than those who were in both. It’s nice if late.

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  14. This story reminds me about Albie Gotze. He was a SAAF Mustant pilot in Korea.

    Lots of pictures.

    https://plus.google.com/photos/114168605519980656914/albums/5019449076494324049?banner=pwa

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    • You see, I knew the information was out there, I just don’t always know where to look; the exact reason why I am always asking the reader to add here anything they know or find on their own. A lot of photos on that link and I appreciate you taking the time to include it; I’m certain the readers will enjoy it too. I noticed the typo of Mustant, but I’ll delete your message informing me – anyone who has been on your sites knows that you meant Mustang!

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    • Awesome collection and such great info on the photos, even the ones that were not in English!

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