V-E Day

United-States-Flag-Code-Questions

V-E DAY WAS A VICTORY FOR MILLIONS

Times Square, NYC the night of V-E Day

Times Square, NYC the night of V-E Day

NO MATTER WHAT COLOR YOUR FLAG IS – SHOW YOUR SUPPORT FOR THE SACRIFICE THOSE MEN GAVE FOR YOU

us-flag-and-soldier-1

If any of you have a story you wish to tell, feel free to add it here and wear your colors proudly.

VEDAY1

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on May 8, 2013, in Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 30 Comments.

  1. I see Lieutenant Carwood Lipton:) This may be off-topic, but I really liked his character in “Band of Brothers.” He seemed to encapsulate the true role of an NCO. I, myself, served in the Republic of Korea Air Force, and during training at OTS, we got to watch an episode every weekend. Wow, what a great website you have!!

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    • Thank you very much and you’ve done your country proud by serving. A dear friend of mine who served in Vietnam 2 tours couldn’t say enough about how good the ROKs were.

      Like

  2. I remember my mom and Nan Nan telling me stories of V-E day. What I remember most is how everyone, from the smallest child to elderly folks worked together, selling war bonds, collecting scrap metal, not hoarding sugar – whatever they could, to win the war. I often wonder if our country even possesses the ability much less the desire, to put aside our differences, and fight as a united entity.

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    • With politics and political correctness, I don’t think it’s possible. WWII was the last was we won and if you think about the bombings that it took to do that – we would be condemned for it. Also, the generations that followed were pampered too much to ever allow themselves to revert back to self-denial for the greater-good.

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  3. You might appreciate this, from a veteran of World War II on the world of today:

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/may/09/is-camerons-britain-what-we-fought-for

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    • I am very happy that now there is a permanent link on this site for that article. Mr. Smith’s writing was fluid, descriptive and (I hope) hit a sore spot in the guts of our politicians and businessmen. Thank you VERY much for sending me this.

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  4. For my grandpa, the war was far from over. it was just another day from the USS Yorktown, CV-10. Here’s what he wrote: 5-8-45
    “Complete unconditional surrender of Germany was announced at 2230 last night. We were to strike Okinawa today but the skies were overcast and it was hard to (see) other ships in our force. it rained all day. A rainy day at sea is miserable.”

    The next week is filled with posts that start, “Struck Okinawa.” It was August 15 before the war ended in the Pacific, according to his diary.

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    • Your grandpa was correct. To the men of the Pacific, they were happy for the soldiers in Europe, but to them it was another day of fighting. They did hope that maybe they would then receive assistance from the armies no longer needed over there.

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  5. Your post prompted me to look at my 1945 binder of letters to see what I could find. I came across two quotes from my father’s (Alfred Peabody Guion) letters written at that time, when he was in France..
    The first – in a letter dates May 13, 1945:
    “The future is even more a blank, just now, than before, but it doesn’t look bright. Being as optimistic as I am it is hard to get me down. I’m still hoping to see you all soon.
    Local news, due to repression by the end of the E.T.O. campaign, just isn’t, and the news of the news is old.”

    The second written in Langres, France, is dated May 20, 1945:
    “Received your letter dated May 6 (verging on V-Day). Some restrictions have been lifted on censorship, and therefore I can now tell you that we are stationed at Langres, France, which is south-east of Paris about one hundred and fifty miles. It is between Dijon and Nancy, and we have been here since our first move from southern France.
    Activities have increased here since V-E Day and I’ve not done anywhere near enough writing. In fact, I’ve only written two letters to Marianni (his wife, Marian) during this entire week.”

    No news in particular about V-E Day, just the knowledge that it will mean another transfer for his outfit with no idea where or when. Very typical of the Army, and probably the other branches of the service also.

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    • Just as I had trouble keeping track of things in the Pacific, once the enemy surrendered in Europe, entire countries were having their borders changed, people were being expatriated, the World Court had to be set up for the war crimes, army units were deciding who was needed there and who would go to the Pacific, etc. the list goes on. Having quotes from people who were actually on the scene help makes it more realistic and comprehensible to the rest of us. Thanks Judy!!

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  6. I love the photos. I’ve only seen depictions of the celebrations in old movies.

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  7. My mother was in the ATS in Britain…she had been making radios for the resistance in France and Holland and when the war in Europe ended she was preparing for a move to Australia to continue making radios for the resistance in the Asian field of war.

    She said the sheer relief to be free from attack by doodlebugs and V1s was heady…she could not believe there would not be more death, destruction and fear.
    She is still going strong at 96..and has memories well worth recording.

    She had the great delight of receiving the medal of one of the towns in France where her radios were used…the only time I have ever known mother speechless.

    She lost so many friends…men in combat, girls on the anti aircraft guns, civilians under the bombardments…and she is disgusted that the freedoms for which she and they fought have been trodden underfoot by modern governments.

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  8. A beautiful post! I am always interested when someone listens to the whispers of the past and passed them on.

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  9. Nice touch for those in our collective past… Thanks.

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  10. I can’t wait to be able to sit down and read your entire blog. I will begin later today. Thanks.
    I will add a link from my Blog to yours. May I copy and paste the Victory Poem to my blog referencing yours of course?

    Like

  11. Pierre Lagacé

    What about V-J Day?
    Do you have any reference in your father’s letters?

    Like

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