“Voices from Vietnam” by: Kayleen Reusser / Review

‘Voices from Vietnam’ by: Kayleen Reusser

VOICES FROM VIETNAM

by:  Kayleen Reusser

 

Vietnam was the 10-year “Police Action” that developed and escalated in my generation’s  youth.  We saw casualty lists in the newspapers increasing daily.  Here in Kayleen Reusser’s book are interviews with the troops that managed to survive the horror that was the Vietnam War.

Keyleen Reusser

In this book, a background story is given for each contributor, their branch of military, method of service and then, what they experienced.  But the pains of war did not stop with their return home.  These gallant people told Kayleen of what they ran into upon returning to the United States.  The events, such as protesters, and name calling, are embarrassing, disheartening and downright disappointing to know how the people of this country were behaving toward these troops.

Despite the home front’s utter fear of the draft and disapproval of the war, these veterans carried on and we are privileged to read of their accomplishments.  There are photos of them, so that you can visualize the veteran to the story.

Vietnam veterans

This era was opposite that of WWII, but I hope “Voices from Vietnam” has the same affect on other readers as it had on me.  It brought back memories, but added an insight that can still be learned by this and future generations.  You will find yourself turning the pages and going from one story to another.

Just as Kayleen’s book, “We Gave Our Best” inspired me and gave me hope for our future and our military – I recommend this book wholeheartedly and hope many will give these men and women the time to tell their stories that no one wanted to hear in the ’60’s and ’70’s.

Through it all, they remained true and loyal.

This is an honest and straightforward depiction of that era – A MUST READ.

TO LOCATE KAYLEEN REUSSER AND HER BOOK – CLICK HERE!

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Military Humor – 

 

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Walter Morgan Bryant – Delray Beach, FL; USMC, Vietnam, Sgt.

Leo Cummings, Jackson, MI; US Army, 11th Airborne Division

Jim Grewe – Edina, MN; US Army, Vietnam, 4th Infantry & 101st Airborne Division

Gilbert L. Harris – Spotsylvania, VA; US Army, 82nd Airborne Division, Green Beret

Stephen Hoke – Meadville, PA; US Army, Vietnam, 1st Calvary & 82nd Airborne Division

Jerry L. O’Nan – Lexington, KY; USMC, Vietnam, Pfc. # 2132524, E Co/4/2/3rd Marine Division, KIA (Quang Nam Province, SV)

Michael R. Paul – Williamsburg, KY; US Army, Vietnam, radio repair, 101st Airborne Division

Robert J. Reginald – Lindenhurst, NY; US Army, Vietnam, Cpl. # 52748547, B/502/2/101st Airborne Division, KIA (SV)

Timothy C. Reitmann – Valley Stream, NY; US Army, Vietnam, Spec. # 52748020, vehicle repair, A/2/5/11 Field Force, KIA (SV)

Eugene “Butch” Skoch – East Meadow, NY; US Army, Vietnam, Pfc., KIA

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About GP

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GP is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on November 28, 2022, in Book Reviews, First-hand Accounts, Post WWII, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 110 Comments.

  1. When I was in Grad school (77-79) some of my friends were vets going to College under the vet Act (whatever it was called). They were all good folks, but some were troubled indeed.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. I have bookmarked her site GP. Thank you for letting us know about her book.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I was 4 years old when we picked up my uncle from Scott’s AFB on his return home. It was a somber moment that wasn’t lost to my very young observations. These guys sure did deserve more!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Americaoncoffee

    An interesting book for sure. The author has niched into a perfect timing with tie ins that are relevant to boomers and successive generations.

    Liked by 1 person

    • She has quite a number of books dedicated to the veterans. Kayleen believes as I do that patriotism should never go out of style.
      Stay safe and thank a veteran whenever you can.
      Thank you.

      Like

  5. GP, Just came by to say Hi, appropriately under a post on a book about Vietnam, where I served in 1970. May all be well! I’m still alive! Phil

    Liked by 1 person

    • It is great to hear from you. I’m afraid to go to any blogs these days and ask why they’ve been away – I received too many bad replies. Glad to hear you’re still with us!! I usually refrain from reading anything about Nam, but this was easy reading and I slipped from one story to the next. Maybe one day you’ll tell us your story. I can’t thank you enough for your service!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. What an awful time in my beloved nation’s history. Remembering the voices will show the human side. My FIL fought there and would never talk about it. Great review for your blog, GP.

    Liked by 3 people

  7. My husband told me no one was allowed to wear their uniform off base because of being subjected to booing and worse.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Thanks for sharing this book! Since Vietnam was such a huge part of our life, I see it as a must read!!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Soldiers literally go through hell just to keep their nation safe, thanks for the article Swabby429

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Thanks for your like of my post on Matthew 16: you are very kind.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Going onto my reading list. We should also recall “The Forgotten War” – Breakout by Martin Russ

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Clearly an important book

    Liked by 1 person

  13. That sounds like a great book! We don’t hear enough from the people who actually served in Viet Nam.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Thanks for letting us know about this new book, GP. I haven’t read a book about Vietnam in years. Maybe it’s time to revisit that subject.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. I know I was indeed in Acapulco. Warships lay off the coast. The crew that returned from the war in Vietnam ,came to dock there for a few days before the soldiers went home. The soldiers all seemed dazed by the horror of war. Never did see anything like that and never forgot it.Seeing horror in their eyes.I feel pain for all those young soldiers.

    Liked by 2 people

  16. One could disagree with the government’s reasons for sending troops, but how could one not support our own men? It tore at my heart to see that happen, back then and it still makes me tear up. So many lives wrecked.

    Liked by 2 people

  17. Thanks for sharing. First hand accounts tell the real story and are very impactful.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Thanks for the recommendation. I recently read ‘Australia’s Secret Army’ by Michael Vietch, about new book about our Coastwatchers in WWII who got little recognition back home for their remarkable efforts.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Sounds like an important book that is “accessible” for those who might otherwise steer clear of Vietnam subject matter. Thanks for sharing this, GP.

    Liked by 2 people

  20. Excellent review, GP. Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 2 people

  21. When a friend of mine returned from Vietnam, he said they yelled at him and even spit on him when they landed in the United States. People did not treat these soldiers with any respect. But my friend went on to try and help the veterans by driving the bus that takes them for medical treatment.

    Liked by 2 people

  22. The picture under Leo Cummings salute, so poignant. Had not seen that before.

    Liked by 2 people

  23. “We Gave Our Best” – in later years I’ve come to the conclusion that our men in uniform are so much better than the Congress that sends them there, that it’s not even close. Sacrificing our young men the past 60 years for usually nothing. I remember the time quite well. David Horowitz pointed out most were protesting the draft, not the war. Once the draft ended so did the protests. The other thing I didn’t realize at the time, was that period really was a “social revolution”, and the good guys lost. The country lost. This is not the country I grew up in. (thanks for the review to tell us aout this interesting book)

    Liked by 1 person

    • This is not the country we grew up in, that world has ceased to exist and our children loose out because of that.
      I felt the protestors were afraid of the draft because of their fear of death. They had no courage or standards. Their calling soldiers ‘baby killers’ used to make my skin crawl.

      Liked by 2 people

  24. Thanks for the review.
    I had a 5-man team that spent our year living with the Vietnamese in small villages and hamlets. I once commented to a friend who served with a large American force and earned 3 purple hearts that, like the Indian fable of the blind men describing the elephant, everyone had a different experience even if we were in country at the same time. He replied “we each had a different experience than the man fighting next to us.”

    Liked by 2 people

  25. That sounds a really good book. Most of the troops in any war fought by the western nations will always remain ” true and loyal” and they are never the people to be assailed with “protesters, and name calling”. I think we all know who the real targets are, the politicians who want to look good by attacking some third world country but then who find that that country is prepared to fight tooth and nail rather than be pushed around. But never, never, pick on your own soldiers. They are putting their lives on the line for the nation.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. Thank you for recommending a good book, GP.

    Liked by 1 person

  27. Bless you both for remembering Vietnam vets!

    Liked by 1 person

  28. I remember one Vietnam vet from our small village who had been the All-American Boy when he was drafted and sent to Vietnam. He came back addicted to herion. I remember catching sight of him from time to time. He looked like a wraith. I sometimes think of him and wonder what happened to him.

    Liked by 2 people

  29. Thank you, GP, for your acknowledgement. This is now on my list.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. It’s now on my ‘buy next’ list.

    Liked by 1 person

  31. It is always best to read the personal stories of such a long war, and its aftermath. They tell so much more than outsiders and passive observers could hope to achieve. Vietnam defined a generation of Americans who fought there, and books like this one are necessary to understand the human cost of such conflicts.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 3 people

  32. Wonderful review, GP. Appreciating our returning warriors, is one of the few things that we are doing better at nowadays. Now if we could do better with so many other things….

    Liked by 3 people

  33. Thanks so much for your supportive words. I will forward this to the Vietnam vets in the book and to my email newsletter list. We can’t do enough for our vets, especially those who deserve a sincere ‘Welcome Home.’

    Liked by 3 people

  34. This sounds like a fascinating read

    Liked by 2 people

  35. Thanks for this “go get” GP. It also sounds like an important grandchild read.

    Liked by 2 people

  36. Thanks for this very interesting recommendation, GP! Also very interesting and enlightening, that the Vietnam war at first was declarated as “Police Action”. Really? It seems Wladimir has learned history very well. 😉 Best wishes, and enjoy a beautiful week! xx Michael

    Liked by 2 people

  37. I will suggest this book to my Vietnam veterans friends.

    Liked by 3 people

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