Okinawa’s Typhoon + The Emperor’s plans

Okinawa typhoon damage

14 August, the Emperor made a recording to be played over the Japanese radio stating that their government had surrendered to the Allied powers and to request that his people cooperate with the conquerors. The fanatics, mainly Army officers and also known as die-hards or ultras, attempted to confiscate the prepared discs and claim that the Emperor had been coerced into accepting the Potsdam Declaration. People died in this mini revolution and others committed hara-kiri when it failed. Some enemy pilots continue to fly their Zeros as American planes went over Japan.

typhoon damage

“To our good and loyal citizens,

After pondering deeply the general trends of the world and the actual conditions obtaining in our Empire today, we have decided to effect a settlement of the present situation by resorting to an extraordinary measure.

We have ordered our Government to communicate to the Governments of the United States, Great Britain, China, and the Soviet Union that our Empire accepts the provisions of their joint declaration…”    (The complete speech will appear next week)

 

15 August, Washington D.C. received Japan’s acceptance of the terms of surrender. Similar to the Western Electric advertisement pictured, phones and telegraphs buzzed around the world with the news that WWII was over, but reactions varied. Among the men on Okinawa, there was jubilation mixed in with ‘let’s wait and see.”

In Japan, most felt relieved, but others committed suicide to fulfill their duty. Russian troops continued to push into Manchuria to get as far into the area as possible before the Allies could stop them. Troops in Europe were elated to hear that they were no longer being transferred to the Pacific. South America began to see the arrival of Nazi escapees and the United States went wild with gratitude.

Okinawa, typhoon damage

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Military Humor – 

Tee Time

 

 

 

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Marilyn Benson – Orion, IL; US Navy WAVE, WWII

Garland W. Collier – Coleman, TX; US Army Air Corps, WWII, ETO, HQ Co./3/506/101st Airborne Division, Sgt. # 39849456, KIA (Opheusden, NETH)

Francis Duval – Amherst, NH; US Army Air Corps, WWII

Michael Fusco – Syracuse, NY; US Army, WWII, Iceland

Elmore Herold (100) – Cresco, IA; US Army, WWII, Purple Heart

Norbert J. Logan (101) – Delta, CAN; RC Air Force, WWII

Cornelia O. Moore – Conyers, GA; US Army, Korea, HQ Co./ 187th RCT

Joseph J. Puopolo – E. Boston, MA; US Army, Korea, Cpl. # 11193248, Field Wireman, C Batt/38/2nd Infantry Division, POW, KWC (Camp # 5)

Clarence Smoyer – Allentown, PA; US Army, WWII, ETO, gunner, 3rd Armored Division

Adelaido M. Solis – Inez, TX; US Army, Korea, Pfc # 18355862, B Co./1/9/2nd Infantry Division, POW, KWC (Camp # 5)

Charles W. Woodruff – Mocksville, NC; US Army Air Corps, WWII, HQ Co./188th/11th Airborne Division

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Current News –

Today is Canada’s Thanksgiving Day, I send my very best to our Canadian neighbors!!

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U.S. Navy’s Birthday – Thursday,  13 October 2022

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About GP

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GP is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on October 10, 2022, in SMITTY, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 131 Comments.

  1. There always seem to be elements that want hostilities to continue no matter what. They are the embers left from horrific fires.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Shame on the Army officers.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. You were right when you said nature hasn’t seemed to change in thousands of years. It’s all about saving face now, even when faced with the world not agreeing with your stance.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I like the “Call of Duty” meme… Thank you, Heroes! ♥️

    Liked by 1 person

  5. You are coming to “the end”…..what’s next for you?

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Thanks for sharing the information on the speech, GP! The only good thing he could do. What a great relief for so many people. Best wishes, Michael – Enjoy your weekend! xx Michael

    Liked by 2 people

  7. GP, when Rose and I were recently in OAHU we had the honor of visiting the War Memorial Battleship Missouri. It was moving experience and I was impressed by the reverence so many people were showing. God Bless America.
    Thank You.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I am very happy for you (I’m actually jealous), but I greatly appreciate you telling me that people were respecting the history and what that generation did. Thank you!! 🇺🇸

      Like

  8. You always share so much information that I didn’t know GP. I wish there was no such thing as war, so many deaths and injuries makes me sick to my stomach.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. We’ve heard of “war-mongering fanatics” who pretended they didn’t know about surrendering, but of course, nobody called it a “mini-revolution.”

    Liked by 2 people

  10. Nice GP! Even my children like Japanese Food..

    Liked by 2 people

  11. I remember WWII: the blackouts, losing our Japanese gardener*, ration points, war stamps and bond drives, gasoline stickers on the car, Roosevelt’s funeral, and the LA Daily News headline after VE Day: “SO SORRY; WAR NOT OVER YET.”

    The gardener came by after internment had begun, looking for one of his employees who had gone missing. He left a card and told my mother if she saw the guy, she should not approach him, but call the number on the card.

    Liked by 2 people

  12. Correction for Farewell Salutes:
    “Conelia O. Moore – Conyers, GA; US Army, Korea, HQ Co./ 187th RCT” should read “Cornelia Moore,” etc.

    Liked by 2 people

  13. Gelukkig kwam er toen een einde aan de oorlog. Japanners zijn zo plichtsgetrouw dat zelfmoorden volgden. Alles werd terug rustig maar steeds nieuwe oorlogen barsten los. Gruwelijk wat mensen elkaar aandoen. Kijk maar naar Rusland. Die oorlog blijft er maar duren. Verschrikkelijk

    Liked by 2 people

  14. I can definitely see a lot of folks saying “let’s wait and see.” After such a vicious war, I wonder if I was around back then if I’d be so confident it had actually ended. Thanks as always for sharing, GP.

    Liked by 2 people

  15. Thanks for the interesting post.

    Liked by 2 people

  16. I knew very little indeed about this period of WW2, so thank you so much for curing a little of my ignorance! My Dad was over the moon when he was told he was not going to Japan. He had been slated to go with his squadron and bomb the bridges between the main island and Kyushu.

    Liked by 2 people

  17. The thought of surrender must be hard to swallow for some of the die-hard Japanese soldiers. They believe in the divine origin of the Japanese people and that they are predestined to rule the world.

    Liked by 2 people

  18. Great article my friend. Thank you. I just watched “The greatest Beer Run Ever,” which was based on a true story, I’m sure you know all about it. I will never understand how men or women either manage to serve in the military and come back and ever be the same. Blessings to you. 🦋❤️

    Liked by 2 people

    • I haven’t seen the movie yet, but I am looking forward to it.
      Thank you for stopping by, Joni.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Generally, they are not the same. My uncle was gassed in WWI, but denied certain benefits that should have been a slam dunk.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I assume that is the case, which breaks my heart. We have known of people/neighbors that were in Vietnam and they spent years of their lives fighting for benefits for Agent Orange. I am sorry about your uncle. I have had the honor of working as a contract nurse with the VA Hospital in Seattle. I had some pretty big arguments with people on staff about the lack of care I saw. I was blessed to meet these wonderful men. I had to shove back the tears more than once. Although I have been known to curl up in bed with a woman or two who was dying and had no family, just to hold their hand and let them know they were not alone. Blessings again my friend for what you do to help keep the memories of the lives of those who have served their Country alive. Big hugs and love, Joni

        Liked by 1 person

  19. It’s extremely hard to lose, GP, as we’re finding out in our own country. I’m not surprised that some Japanese resisted and preferred to keep fighting and die rather than surrender. I’m so glad that Japan is the country it is today.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. GP, always like reading your accounts of WWII. My younger son knows that war history and talks about it to whoever has an interest. For his 60th birthday coming up, I bought him DK Eyewitness World War II book. (Illustrated). More for the younger grandkids that he can show & tell war history. It cannot be lost. History seems to be slipping away in the youth today. 📚🎶 Christine

    Liked by 2 people

    • It appears to be a very entitled youth we have today. So yes, I agree , history will be lost.
      Remember in “The Time Machine”, when he went to the future, the books crumbled when he touched them.

      Liked by 1 person

  21. We are thankful that this terrible war came to end. Yet, we are sad that so many other wars continue to plague mankind. One wonders whether wars will ever end.

    Liked by 2 people

  22. To commit seppuku rather than accept defeat is beyond my Western thinking. The end of WWII must have been such a relief. Thank you, GP for all your work put into your posts.

    Liked by 3 people

    • I appreciate you taking in all this history, and believe me, you are not alone in your thinking about seppuku – there were even quite a few Japanese who agreed with you.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Have you read “Patriotism,” a short story by Yukio Mishima about a Japanese officer’s ritual suicide after a failed coup attempt (pre-WWII)? I was assigned the story in college, and left the room in tears when the class ended. To see suicide glorified in such a graphic and erotic way was a very difficult object lesson in cultural differences.

        Liked by 2 people

  23. An excellent report on the Emperor’s surrender speech, GP. The feelings on both sides must have been overwhelming. Looking forward to next week.

    Liked by 3 people

  24. The announcement of surrender would have been difficult to make I’m sure and difficult for the people of Japan to accept. The rest of the world would have been quite happy to have an end put to the war.

    Liked by 2 people

  25. “..the general trends of the word…” quite an interesting statement. Happy Thanksgiving GP

    Liked by 2 people

  26. Almost at the end, and still people are dying. The tragedy continues until the very last second.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 2 people

  27. A rather strange parallel to the various reactions to our most recent presidential election. Unfortunately I fear our issues may not be resolved before the next election.

    Liked by 2 people

  28. Another interesting post with some great toons. Some things never seem to change with either Russia or the Soviet Union — land grabs.

    Liked by 2 people

  29. Mother’s group were all set to be moved to Australia to continue their work with radios until the surrender.

    Liked by 2 people

  30. Your post made me think of the concept of the “War to end all wars,” G. But even then, the Russians were scrambling to grab all of the territory they could. It seems there is always another dictator waiting in the wings, always interests that see more advantages in war than peace. –Curt

    Liked by 1 person

  31. Even back them, with allies like the Russians, we don’t need enemies

    Liked by 3 people

  32. We tend to assume everyone would rejoice at the end of hostilities, but that clearly wasn’t the case in Japan. Today, the same dynamic probably would play out (or is playing out) in Russia — except there, it’s the leader who’s reluctant to end the hostilities. It seems many of his people have a different opinion.

    Liked by 2 people

  33. I am not American and I am not old enough to remember much of what I see and read in your posts, but I always and I mean always enjoy the way you present and educate us on what was,, and what is now. thank you. You show a lot of caring. that is so important in todays world.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Most people do not remember the war, it was too long ago, but I certainly appreciate you wanting to learn about it. This war altered the entire world and still influences what goes on, so I feel learning the history might help us to understand the present and future.

      Liked by 4 people

  34. Thank you, GP, for the interesting post.

    Joanna

    Liked by 2 people

  35. Haven’t read the emperor’s full statement (looking forward to reading the full thing in your next installment), but the excerpt seems intentionally to omit any indication of the word “surrender” or any other phrase for unconditional capitulation. To “save face,” I suppose.

    Liked by 3 people

  36. The final days of the War are fascinating history on their own. The culmination of hostilities brought emotional and existential relief to the world. Yet, we still experience many of the repercussions of the War today.

    Liked by 3 people

  37. The notion of defeat had to be hard to accept. I imagine the notion of victory was equally hard for the soldiers on Okinawa. It’s one thing to be in Europe and be told you aren’t going to the Pacific theater. It had to be another thing entirely for the people who were already there. On top of everything else, a typhoon.

    I hope you have a nice week, GP.

    Liked by 4 people

  38. The emperor’s voice was unusual. I understand that the Japanese people had never heard him speak before.

    Liked by 3 people

  39. If anybody wants to read a GREAT book on the Nava/Air Operations during Okinawa check out The Twilight Warriors by Robert Gandt. While you are at James D. Hornfischer’s most recent book The Fleet at Flood Tide is also an Amazing Read!

    Liked by 3 people

  40. Thank you, Ned.

    Like

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