Leyte | start of November 1944

3 November – When the Japanese 57th Regiment arrived at Limon, Gen. Krueger’s 24th Division was on the other side of the mountain range.  Rather than attack the lightly defended enemy positions, he halted his troops.  For some reason, he was expecting a possible enemy amphibious landing and the US attack would not begin for 2 more days.

5→10 November – in the 19th year of Showa, for the Japanese, the G.I. mortar and machine-gun fire seemed to nearly wipe out the squad scaling the ridge.  As the brush caught fire, the Americans of I Company/3rd Battalion/21st Infantry Regiment/ 24th Division, attacked and charged over the ridge until the enemy’s big guns opened up.  Another Japanese force arrived and the US troops retreated.  This would be known as Breakneck Ridge [Yahiro Hill to the Japanese].

Breakneck Ridge, Leyte; courtesy of Koji Kanemoto

Even with the support of the 1st Cavalry, the soldiers were pushed back, but they would return on the 8th.  They then proceeded to continually hit the ridge until the 10th, when the Japanese 3rd Battalion was ordered to tenshin. (which means to turn around and advance).  The few survivors remaining did make it back to their supply depot.

Breakneck Ridge (highlighted) map

6 November – Japanese convoy MA-TA 31 escorted by 2 cruisers and other escorting vessels was attacked by a wolfpack of US submarines, Batfish, Ray, Raton, Bream and Guitarro at Luzon.  The Ray fired 6 rear torpedoes at the enemy cruiser  Kumano and destroyed her bow.

US Hellcat fighters and bombers with Avenger torpedo planes attacked enemy airfields and shipping installations throughout southern Luzon.  The US aircraft were intercepted by about 80 Japanese fighters and a dogfight ensued over Clark Field.  The enemy lost 58 planes and 25 more later in the day.  More than 100 Japanese aircraft were destroyed on the ground.  One cruiser sank in Manila Harbor and 10 other vessels were heavily damaged.

IJN Shimakaze

10→11 November – Another Japanese convoy, carrying 10,000 reinforcements for Leyte, escorted by 4

Japanese transport under attack

destroyers, a minesweeper and a submarine chaser.  They were screened by 3 other destroyers, but were intercepted by the US 10th Fleet aircraft as they made their turn into Ormoc Bay.  Before they could reach the harbor, the TF-38 aircraft attacked.  The first wave aimed at the transports.  The second wave hit the destroyers and third wave strafed the beaches and the burning destroyers.  Nine of the ships sank and 13 enemy planes providing air cover were shot down.

The FEAF (Far East Air Force, the 5th A.F.) used 24 B-24’s to hit Dumaguerte Airfield on Negros Island in the P.I. and fighter-bombers were sent to the Palompon area on Leyte.  Targets of opportunity were hit on Mindanao.  Fighter-bombers and B-25s hit shipping and Namlea Airfield, and P-38s hit Kendari Airfield on Celebes Island while B-24a bombed the Nimring River area.

CLICK ON IMAGES TO ENLARGE.

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Military Humor –

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Farewell Salutes – 

Adrian Cervini – Flint, MI; USMC, Korea

Margaret Christie – Toronto, CAN; Women’s Royal Canadian Naval Service, WWII

Final Mission

Joseph Devlin – Johnstown, PA; US Navy, WWII, submarine service

Roy D. Eneroth – Thornton, WA; US Army, WWII, PTO

Wesley E. Graham – Watervliet, MI; US Navy, WWII, PTO, Seaman 1st Class, USS Oklahoma, KIA (Pearl Harbor )

John Klunder – E.Elmurst, NY; US Navy, WWII, PTO, radioman 1st Class, USS Fayette (APA-43)

Anthony R. Mazzulla – Bronx, NY; US Army, Korea, 1st Lt., Co B/1/32/7th Infantry Division, KIA (Chosin Reservoir, NK)

George E. Park – Bedford, MA; US Navy, WWII, Quartermaster/Navigator, USS Bunker Hill

Duane I. Pierce – Lyndon, VT; US Navy, WWII, PTO

William Potoka Sr. – Mt. Pleasant, PA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, Co C/127th Engineers/11th Airborne Division

John R. Samuelson – Page, City, KS; US Army, WWII

Jim Warnica – Clovis, NM; US Navy, WWII, PTO

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About GP

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GP is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on October 4, 2021, in WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 75 Comments.

  1. I tried to respond to your post today after reading the letter of your dad to your mom. Unfortunately, I got this reply from WordPress: 404: The requested page was not found

    Like

  2. They did a great job of it.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. With so much action on land, air and sea in an archipelago with thousands of islands, it is amazing anyone could even keep track of what was going on.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. The destruction and loss of life on both sides is hard to contemplate. I am not sure how much humans have learned in all these years. I know my father preferred the company of cats to people.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. It definitely was a horrible time for all this soldiers. Thanks for sharing, GP! Enjoy a beautiful weekend! Sorry, i had a delay, because i am re-activating all my scanners and OCR-devices for better paperwork. 😉 xx Michael

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Als ik het verhaal lees kan ik niet begrijpen dat de soldaten het zo lang hebben vol gehouden. Moet verschrikkelijk geweest zijn

    Like

    • Ik weet wat je bedoelt. Tegenwoordig gaan soldaten op dienstreizen van 6>9 maanden. Destijds zat je erin totdat ze je niet meer nodig hadden. Die generatie was ongelooflijk!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Always enjoy details that I was not previously aware of – Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Always learning more each time I visit your blog GP. I also like the second military humor. Good one!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Maybe it’s Maybelline 😂🤣😂

    Liked by 2 people

  10. Thanks for your like of my post, “Revelation Prophecy – Introduction;” you are very kind.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Fascinating, GP. I love the cartoons and Derrick’s comment about Smitty. I also like the Japanese focus of the article. Learned something new today.

    Liked by 2 people

  12. A careful read of the figures for what the Japanese lost, and it’s easy to see that in December 1941, despite initial successes, they really did not know what they were getting into.

    Liked by 3 people

    • For 2000 years, they succeeded in what they did, I suppose it never occurred to them that they’d fail. I guess that realization may have caused a few suicides.

      Like

  13. Thanks for detailing the events, GP. I loved the camouflage joke. 😁

    Liked by 2 people

  14. Just reading this short excerpt highlights the constant combat on land and sea that went on right until the end. I always wonder how those involved coped with the daily stress and danger.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 2 people

  15. Wow! That all seems pretty relentless!

    Liked by 2 people

  16. Excellent history as usual, GP.

    Liked by 2 people

  17. Thanks you for the map…my geography is somwhat eurocentric and it made the narrative easier to follow.

    Liked by 2 people

  18. Gosh. I am always wowed at what those soldiers went through. Major league.

    Liked by 2 people

  19. I got a chuckle out of the camoflage meme.

    Liked by 2 people

  20. This stopped me for a minute: “the Japanese 3rd Battalion was ordered to tenshin (which means to turn around and advance).” Is that a creative way of saying “retreat” without saying “retreat”?

    Liked by 5 people

  21. This was a great chronology of events, GP. I find myself stuck thinking about the transports being attacked. I understand what a huge difference it made, keeping those troops and their supplies out of the action, but I can’t imagine dying that way. In war, but not yet in battle, At least not the battle those men were trained to wage.

    I hope you have a nice week.

    Liked by 3 people

  22. I’d love to think that was Smitty in the cartoon

    Liked by 5 people

  23. Thank you for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

  1. Pingback: Leyte | start of November 1944 – Talking Sports Around The Clock

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