Adm. Nimitz – 136th Birthday & USMC Raiders

Pacific War Museum, Nimitz statue

Chester W. Nimitz was born on February 24, 1885 – and today would have been his 136th birthday. The National Museum of the Pacific War is located in Fredericksburg. Texas because Nimitz grew up here and he was a major figure in the U.S. victory over Japan in WWII. 

Nimitz reached the pinnacle of naval leadership when he was promoted to the 5-star rank of Fleet Admiral in late 1944. As the Commander in Chief, Pacific Ocean Area, he led more than two million men and women, 5,000 ships and 20,000 planes in the Pacific Theater. 

Adm. Nimitz at the “Old Texas Roundup”


He was known to be a congenial and accessible leader and that sailors loved and respected him. He is pictured here at the “Old Texas Roundup” speaking to his guests –  sailors, soldiers and Marines who hailed from Texas. The barbeque was held on January 1944 on Oahu, Hawaii, and Nimitz reportedly invited 40,000 Texans to celebrate their heritage.

 

The following video may be too long for some to watch, but I do recommend a little scanning through it.  The original films are included, and I’m certain you will enjoy that.

 

*****          **********          *****

Maj. Gen. James F. Glynn, commander of Marine Forces Special Operations Command, addresses MARSOC personnel during the rededication ceremony at Camp Lejeune, N.C. Feb. 22, 2021. On Feb. 24, 2006, the Marine Corps combined several of its specialized and uniquely trained units, gave them a name and a commander and directed them to become pioneers in a new chapter of Marine Corps history. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt Jesula Jeanlouis)

Fifteen years ago, the Marine Corps combined several of its specialized and uniquely trained units to become pioneers in a new chapter of Marine Corps history within Special Operations Command. While MARSOC can still be considered a relatively young unit, the history of Marine Corps specialized forces can be traced back much further than 2006.

The original Marine Raiders date back to World War II when the Marines were called on to solve complex problems posed by our nation’s adversaries. These specially trained Marines helped turn the tide in the early stages against the imperial Japanese Army. In honor and recognition of those that came before, the Marine Corps officially re-designated those serving with MARSOC as Marine Raiders in 2015.

################################################################################################################

Military Humor – Navy style – 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

################################################################################################################

Farewell Salutes – 

Scot Ames Jr. – Pekin, IN; US Air Force, 50th Flying Training Squadron, instructor pilot

Tanner W. Byholm – Ashland, WI; US Air Force Reserve

Joseph Couris – Philadelphia, PA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, Captain, pilot B-17 “Rose of York”

B. Paul Hart – Williams, AZ; US Navy, WWII, PTO, radioman

Harry Lord – Farmingham, MA; US Navy, PTO, Chief Boatswain’s Mate (Ret. 30 y.)

Paul Mitchem – McDowell County, WV; US Army, Cpl. Korea, Co K/3/34/24th Infantry Division. KIA (Ch’onan, SK)

John Osgood – Claremont, NH; US Army, WWII, ETO

Lada Smisek – Cleveland, OH; US Navy, WWII, PTO, Chief Machinist’s Mate, POW, KIA (P.I.)

William D. Tucker – USA; US Navy, WWII, Fireman 1st Class, USS Oklahoma, KIA (Pearl Harbor)

Michaux Turbeville – SC; US Army, Korea, Pfc., HQ Co/ 3/31/7th Infantry Division, KIA (Chosin Reservoir)

################################################################################################################

################################################################################################################################################################################################################################

About GP

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GP is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on February 25, 2021, in Post WWII, Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 102 Comments.

  1. He was certainly a great admiral and a remarkable person as well.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Amen, and may our ONE TRUE GOD Bless All our USA Veterans and their Families and Friends!!

    Love Always and Shalom, YSIC \o/

    Kristi Ann

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I dont know him.But reading your post learns me he was a great admiral and good leader

    Liked by 1 person

  4. What an interesting written portrait, GP. The statue is so lifelike in its pose. Marvelous post all around. Hugs on the wing.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. I wrote about women being drafted as well as Transgenders. Signs of the times, and I know that part 2 is going to be very interesting to write, especially the tactical stages. I am no where near as good as yourself. Plus, it took me a month to write it.

    https://artymarty99.wordpress.com/2021/02/28/its-okay-to-cry-tribute-to-sophie-xeno/

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Hello GP! I hope i am allowed to mention a good blogger friend, wonderful woman, mother and writer: Sue Vincent (scvincent.com). Please have some good thoughts for her, because she has today written her maybe last posting for us: https://thesilenteye.co.uk/2021/02/28/the-last-post-2/
    I am feeling so sorry, maybe loosing her! Thank you, Michael

    Liked by 1 person

    • I used to follow Sue, but she never bothered to make a return visit, so over time, I dropped her. I always liked her site, but couldn’t spare the time for someone who couldn’t reciprocate once in a while.
      But, for you I will go back and try to cheer her up.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Thanks for your like of my post, “Road To Tribulation 9” I appreciate your kindness.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Heroes: Admiral Nimitz and the Corps’ raiders

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Well… Don’t be a DJ and mix business with pleasure politics and military not a good mix

    Like

  10. It’s always been interesting to me that Admiral Nimitz is one of the best-known military leaders in Texas. I’ve actually heard his name in the mouth of a teenager, which is somehow remarkable. I suspect that his Texas roots lead to his being included in classrooms, and of course the museum is considered a must-see in Fredericksburg. No, I’ve not yet been there, but it’s certainly on my list for a rainy-day visit when I’m in the area.

    Liked by 1 person

    • It is great to know that some people make a point to not only remember the best from that generation, but pass it on to the younger generations! Thanks, Linda!

      Like

  11. He was a great man!

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Happy Birthday Admiral Nimitz

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Great héro, and Great sacrifices.🎉👌

    Liked by 1 person

  14. I think the Admiral Nimitz statue has to be one of the most casual statues of a military man I’ve ever seen! The photo of him in the ten-gallon heart was quite a sight!

    Liked by 2 people

  15. We need heroes today! I am afraid there aren’t any.😞😩😣

    Liked by 2 people

  16. He was amazing. There’s a building at USNA named for him so I learned about him during that time. Thank goodness America had men like him when we needed them.

    Liked by 3 people

  17. Another great hero. I love the way honouring him with a statue, and – if i remember right, but dont ask me about the class of it – the naming of a ship. Thank you for sharing, GP! Enjoy a sunny, funny weekend! Its FL on your site! :-)) Michael

    Liked by 2 people

    • You are quite right, Michael. Here is what Wiki has to say…
      USS Nimitz (CVN-68) is a supercarrier of the United States Navy, and the lead ship of her class. One of the largest warships in the world, she was laid down, launched, and commissioned as CVAN-68, “aircraft carrier, attack, nuclear powered”, but she was later redesignated as CVN-68, “aircraft carrier, multi-mission, nuclear-powered”, on 30 June 1975, as part of a fleet-wide realignment that year.
      Have a great weekend yourself, my friend!

      Like

  18. I had begun this intending to skip some of it, but the video was far too compelling to do so. Thanks very much, GP

    Liked by 2 people

  19. A wonderful tribute! Thank you to Adm. Nimitz!
    Sounds like he was a great example to the troops that we as human beings can learn, grow, have respect for others, etc.
    (((HUGS))) 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  20. Two wonderful cartoons, especially the one with the anchor!

    Liked by 3 people

  21. Adm. Nimitz sounds like a true Texan…always doing things in a big way. Glad they have a Pacific War museum in his hometown.

    Liked by 3 people

  22. Interesting posts. I recently finished reading Borneman’s book, The Admirals, which covers the careers of Adm. Nimitz, as well and Halsey, King and Leahy. I also wanted to note that my husband worked for Admiral Nimitz’s daughter – she was the librarian at his school and he was her student aide. He received some memorabilia from her related her father’s career, such a first day cover for the USS Nimitz and the commissioning booklet for the ship. (See http://hmstypicallydefiant.blogspot.com He must have been a very good library aide.

    Liked by 2 people

  23. Sounds like an incredible leader. So well respected and achieved through quiet diplomacy.

    Liked by 3 people

  24. Thanks for the history lesson, GP. I’ve scanned through and bookmarked the link for later when I can get to it. Looks good.

    Liked by 3 people

  25. We couldn’t have won this thing without men of this caliber and character. Much is owed.

    Liked by 2 people

  26. Great tribute to Adm. Nimitz! I watched the video and enjoyed the signing ceremony! Thanks for the history of Marine Raiders too. Interesting post, GP!

    Liked by 3 people

  27. Thank you for this profile of the Admiral. He was a great American.

    Liked by 2 people

  28. Hopefully the cartoon sailor stays tethered to the bar, G. Otherwise it will be ‘anchors away!’ 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  29. I mostly know him as he’s been depicted in movies, and from what I can glean from the history I’ve read. I’ve read books on MacArthur and Patton, but never Nimitz. I’ll circle back later and take a look at the video. Maybe it’s time I read about this man.

    Liked by 3 people

  30. This is perhaps one of the most important postings you have made. Not just a bio of Nimitz, but an otherwise overlooked and valuable history lesson.
    MacArthur, for all his military acumen, even genius, was at times an implacable primadonna; Nimitz, nothing of the sort.

    Liked by 2 people

  31. Thanks GP. The movie Midway gives us a capsule of Nimitz’s command in the Pacific. It has me wondering if any historical comparisons have been done of Nimitz’s and Eisenhower’s commands ?

    Liked by 3 people

    • I doubt any comparison would have been made between Nimitz and Eisenhower. Nimitz being US Navy Admiral, Pacific; and Eisenhower, US Army, Atlantic. The situations were far too different. But you never know, you may find one out there.

      Liked by 1 person

  32. Great post, GP. Ironically, the USS Midway (CV-41) Research Library bi-weekly Scuttlebutt just posted a story about an Ensign assigned to the Midway in 1963 when it was homeported in Treasure Island. ADM Nimitz was living there at the time and the Ensign had a strong desire to meet the Admiral. One day he grabbed his copy of his yearbook, the Lucky Bag, and went over to Nimitz’s quarters where he knocked on the door. To find out what happened next https://www.usna.com/tributes-and-stories-1963#Ventured It is a great story and worth reading. 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  33. Lovely to see that very successful leaders can also be so well liked.

    Liked by 2 people

  34. Nice tribute, GP. I enjoyed the film too.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thank you, Pete. The museum reminded me of the birthday, I have to admit and I didn’t know about the Raider anniversary till I read their email. So, I had to go look for a video!

      Liked by 3 people

  35. Nimitz displayed a quiet, diplomatic form of assertiveness. This is a very rare quality these days.

    Liked by 3 people

  36. We visited The National Museum of the Pacific War roughly 15 years ago and thought it was one of the best laid out museums we have ever seen. Anyone visiting that part of Texas should try to get by to Fredericksburg.

    Liked by 5 people

  1. Pingback: Adm. Nimitz – 136th Birthday & USMC Raiders - The Washington County Auditor

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

<span>%d</span> bloggers like this: