25 April ANZAC Women

 

ANZAC Women

With today’s pandemic situation, we are seeing many similarities to WWI (ending in 1919), the 1920 pandemic, the Great Depression and WWII predicaments that also affected the entire planet.

We are additionally discovering that along with our militarys, there are many others that deserve our thanks and appreciation.  So __ with that in mind, I chose, along with Garrulous Gwendoline’s encouragement, to salute the nurses that risked their lives working beside the ANZAC troops that are to be honored this 25 April.

 

Miss Phyllis M. Boissier 

(pictured bottom right in the above image)

Elected Matron of Manly Cottage Hospital in 1912, Boissier then joined the World War I effort. She signed up with the Australian Army Nursing Service and traveled to Egypt in 1914. She was awarded the Royal Red Cross for her war service at Gezirah, where she tended to the wounded soldiers from Gallipoli. She became Matron of the hospital at Dieppe, France in 1917.

In 1918 she accepted the role of Matron at the RPAH. During her years as Matron, Miss Boissier contended with overcrowding in the wards.  She also dealt with complications related to a new onsite building project which caused increased expenditures exacerbated by the Great Depression.   An outbreak of pneumonic flu challenged Miss Bossier, as almost one hundred nurses became sick and were unfit to work.

Pearl Elizabeth Corkhill

Pearl Corkhill

Australian nurse Pearl Elizabeth Corkhill earned a prestigious Military Medal for her bravery as she tended to injured patients during a heavy air raid by German forces. She was serving at a casualty clearing station not far from the front line in Abbeville, France when it came under attack on 23 August, 1918.

During the bombing, Corkhill remained calm and continued to tend to her wounded patients, despite the danger.

Louise Mack

(10 October 1870 – 23 November 1935)

Marie Louise Hamilton Mack was an Australian poet, journalist and novelist. During the First World War, she reported from the front line for London’s Daily Mail and Evening News. She later wrote an autobiography titled A Woman’s Experiences in the Great War and was the author of 16 novels and a book of poetry.

New Zealand nurse, E.S. Barker, Malta 1915

Esther Barker – 

New Zealand’s Ms. Barker and 2 friends were caught in France when war broke out and they sewed shirts for the troops.  During the Gallipoli campaign, “The Trio” as the three artists called themselves, joined up as British Red Cross voluntary aides and sailed for Malta with about 200 other women.

WRN Enid Bell

Enid Bell –

Ms. Bell, a New Zealand nurse Enid Bell was the first ever member of the Women’s Royal Naval Service.  Enid Bell trained as an ambulance driver, and went to France with the British Red Cross in April 1917

Elizabeth Kenny

(20 September 1880 – 30 November 1952)

Elizabeth Kenny was an unaccredited Australian nurse, who developed a controversial new approach to polio treatment while caring for ill soldiers during the First World War.  Her muscle rehabilitation principles became the foundation of physiotherapy.

Working in Australia as an unaccredited bush nurse, Kenny was later accepted to serve during WWI.

She was assigned to dangerous missions on “dark ships”, transport that ran with all lights off between Australia and England. She made 16 round trips and one around the world and was officially promoted to the rank of Sister..

Katie Louisa Ardill

(3 August 1886 – 3 January 1955)

Katie Louisa Ardill was among the first female doctors to join the British Expeditionary Forces in 1915 after her application to serve with the Australian Expeditionary Forces was rejected because she was a woman. At that time, the Australian government prohibited women from service, compelling them to join overseas units instead.

She served as a doctor, treating wounded soldiers for four years in Britain, France and Egypt during the First World War and was promoted to the rank of Captain.

Major Alice Ross-King 

Major Alice Ross-King

(5 August 1887 – 17 August 1968)

Alice Ross-King was one of four nurses awarded a Military Medal for their selfless actions at a casualty clearing station close to the trenches during an air raid in France on 22 July 1917.

Ross-King rescued patients in tents shattered by bombs, either carrying them to safety or putting tables over their beds to protect them. She and three other nurses, Dorothy Cawood, Mary Jane Derrer, and Clare Deacon, were recognized for their courageous actions.

When WWII broke out, Alice re-enlisted with the Australian Army Women’s Medical Services and was heavily involved in raising funds for the Red Cross.

Lest we forget.

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Military Humor – 

desert humor

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Quarantine Humor –

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Trevor Beech – Manawatu, NZ; RNZ Navy # 4345, WWII, radar

Allan Godbaz – Auckland, NZ; RNZ Air Force # 4311330

Ian Gordon – Richmond, AUS; RA Air Force, Air Commodore (Ret.)

Gordon Habgood – NZ; RNZ Air Force, Squadron leader

Roger Midgley – Gandarra, AUS; RA Navy #R63489

John Parkes – Pukeohe, NZ; RNZ Army # 16417

Dorothy (Ford) Pollard – Rotorua, NZ; WRNZ Air Force # 4374, WWII

Reece Stratford – Nelson, NZ; 2NZEF # 273145, WWII, 23rd Battalion

Barry Tebbs – Hamilton, NZ; RNZ Air Force LAC # 344661

Michael Wright – Canberra, AUS; RA Navy, Commander (Ret.)

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on April 23, 2020, in Current News, Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 197 Comments.

  1. Interesting history lesson! That’s true there are some similarities between 100 years ago and the present

    Like

  2. I’m from a military family (My Dad was stationed in Burma WWII) and thus enjoying your blog…. and esp. this one, having lived in NZ some years and follow Anzac posts. Are you from down-under?
    (Hope it is ok to add this: https://cindamackinnon.wordpress.com/2018/11/10/world-war-i-1914-1918/ )

    Liked by 2 people

    • No, I was born in New York and spent the last 50 years in Florida. My interest in the pacific started back as a kid because of my father’s service during WWII.
      I’ve just started following your site and I hope to learn more about your father.

      Like

  3. Reblogged this on The mind is an unexplored country. and commented:
    Damn I missed it!
    In honour of International Nurses Day, which was May 12, I’m reblogging Pacific Paratrooper’s post on ANZAC Nurses.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. absolutely wonderful post!!! I’d love if you’d guest blog post for my site. if you’re so inclined, here’s a link to general guidelines: https://wp.me/p6OZAy-1eQ

    Liked by 2 people

  5. This quarantine is teaching me how valuable my cat was to me. The big lesson, however, was about our doctors. Most stayed home.The Armed Forces saved Quebec and helped Ontario. They are still here. Stay safe.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I hope my doctor did some extra time at the hospital; I know she wasn’t taking office visits. My last appointment was taken care of by the nurse on the phone!
      Stay safe, Micheline!!

      Like

      • My last appointment was by the phone. My doctor told me he would be retiring in December. That was totally unexpected. Syndicates are very powerful in Quebec. Finding help is almost impossible. The premier could not find help. We had to turn to the Armed Forces. I don’t know where my doctor is. He could not help. He has diabetes. I hope he did not try to work. But doctors were needed. Stay safe.

        Like

  6. Thanks for that great tribute to our Australian Nurses gp, well done.

    Liked by 3 people

  7. As a healthcare worker, I truly appreciate you posting this. Thx! 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  8. Just in time for International Nurses Day!

    Liked by 3 people

  9. What a wonderful tribute! ❤️

    Liked by 4 people

  10. I loved this post on the critical role these brave women had

    Liked by 3 people

  11. Heroes come in all shapes and sizes, don’t they? Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 3 people

  12. Always great to see a tribute to women! My mother was a WAC and she taught Geometry to pilots.

    Liked by 3 people

  13. Love this post…a salute to the nurses!!! Perfect!!

    Liked by 3 people

  14. A well-timed tribute, GP.

    Liked by 3 people

  15. Thanks for helping keep the memories of these wonderful women alive

    Liked by 3 people

  16. So appropriate, G, as thousands of women serve in the front lines of the Covid 19 War risking their lives as they do so. Thank you. –Curt

    Liked by 3 people

  17. This is wonderful, GP! I have tears in my eyes reading about all of these women!
    Heroines! But they would have been the first to say they were just doing their job.
    I’ve been thinking a lot about the people who lived through World Wars, Great Depression, Dust Bowl, etc. We should be celebrating them. I imagine most of them were doing what they had to do and did it without whining or complaining.
    So grateful always for those who are were/and are on the front lines.
    (((HUGS))) 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  18. This is so interesting. Never reported but so important.

    Liked by 2 people

  19. Thanks for your contribution GP. People often think that soldiers are there on their own, but there have always been the nurses who look after them when they are injured. And so often they are in the very worst of places.

    Liked by 4 people

  20. Reblogged this on The Reluctant Retiree and commented:
    In these unusual times, it is heart-warming to know that those so far away, remember think of us as we commemorate Anzac Day. This tribute from fellow blogger, the Pacific Paratrooper.

    Liked by 3 people

    • I know how much ANZAC Day means to Australia and New Zealand and I have done what I could to help teach others about it. Thank you for sharing this article.

      Like

  21. You did these women proud GP, and went far beyond those whom I knew of! And thank you for acknowledging me. That was a nice touch.

    Liked by 3 people

    • I give credit where credit is due, Gwen. Thank you again for leading me into the good direction. I’m always afraid, doing commemorative days, that I’m not doing enough. I appreciate you taking the lead!!

      Liked by 1 person

  22. Salute to those nurses

    Liked by 3 people

  23. Thank you, Henry!

    Like

  1. Pingback: Airmen grave – ANZAC DAY – henryhogh

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