The Last CBI Roundup

The Last Roundup

Most of you have been around long enough to have seen excerpts from the CBI Roundup newletter.  We can not end this war without some more articles they used to say farewell.

To insure that men remaining until the end of the I-BT will get the news, The Roundup, a smaller-sized edition of Roundup will commence weekly publication in Calcutta a week from today, April 18. It will be smaller, but its “chota” staff will see to it that it carries a good coverage of local and world news, and some of the entertainment features you have enjoyed in Roundup.  This was published in April 1946.


Small U.S. Group Remains Here

When the last ship pulls out of King George Docks sometime in May, it will still not be a complete farewell to India for American military personnel, because a small number of officers and men will remain behind after Theater inactivation to finish several jobs, some of which may take several months to complete.
It is estimated that the settlement of all claims within the area, including Southeast Asia, will take some months to finish. The establishment and operation of military cemeteries and the continued search for isolated bodies will keep a handful of men busy for three years, according to present estimates.
The prosecution of War Crimes cases will probably require three more months to finish up. The complex problems of financial settlements, payments of bills and claims, termination of contracts, and adjustment of reciprocal aid charges incurred after V-J Day, will probably take a considerable time to wind up.
Some installations and property will have to be kept until the Theater is officially inactivated. These will have to be turned over after the last boat leaves, but it is planned that the turnover will take only about a month.
It is expected that all personnel to remain in India after the Theater closes can be obtained from Regular Army or volunteer ranks.

BEER RATION UPPED

With the coming heat and the resultant increase of parched throats, the ration of beer in the I-B has been raised from two to three (3) cases per man, beginning with the April ration. Theater Army Exchange Service announced this week. Hubba Hubba!

 

You’ve been gone two years this spring,
Didn’t you see a single thing?

Never saw much but the moon shine on

The Ledo Road A Burmese temple around Maingkwan,

A Burmese temple around Maingkwan,

And silver transports high in the sky,
Thursday River and the swift Tanai,
And Hukawng Valley coming all green,
Those are the only sights I’ve seeen.
Did our job, though, like God willed:
We had the Ledo Road to build.

written by: Sgt. Smith Dawless, Los Angeles, CA

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CBI Roundup sketches – 

WILBUR

THAT’S ALL FOLKS!

“Combat?! Hell NO! Calcutta riots!”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Quarantine Humor – 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Robin Armstrong – Toronto, CAN; RC Navy, WWII, HMCS Uganda, radar

Freeman Brown – Atlantic, IA; USMC, WWII, PTO

Francis Cook – Livingston, NY; US Army, WWII, Middle East

Fred Deghi – Willits, CA; US Navy, WWII, PTO, USS Calhoun

John Eastwood – Milwaukee, WI; US Army, Vietnam

George Hyrne – Savannah, GA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, Africa

Andrew Karlak – Seymour, CT; US Navy, WWII, PTO, Seaman 1st Class, USS George

Frank Anthony Petrone Jr. – Archer, FL; US Air Force

Ward Rosen – Fayetville, AR; US Navy, WWII, pilot

Robert Williams – Cleveland, OH; USMC, WWII

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About GP

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GP is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on April 16, 2020, in Post WWII, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 86 Comments.

  1. Only if you’ve been to Calcutta in the summer months can you realise how valuable that ration increase would have been 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. They deserved more beer!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Thank you for another interesting piece, it was a pleasure to read. By the way, please join my blog too if you find it interesting – let’s grow together!😊

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Chaplin: “Our Dada says you can’t go wrong with more beer!”
    Charlee: “Apparently he failed to stock up before California went on lockdown, and now he is rationing himself!”

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Enjoyed that read gp, most of your jokes are actually not only funny, but I think give a great soldiers view of things at the time, cheers.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. More history they never teach in school. So Sad.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Three cases of beer! Now we are talking, G.
    I remember my father-in-law telling me that after the war he couldn’t get a flight out of Burma so he hitched a ride across India and took the boat.
    Also, I don’t know why your post brought up this memory, but suddenly I thought of Francis the Talking Mule. Might make a fun post. –Curt

    Liked by 2 people

  8. These little bits and pieces that followed the war are of interest. They help flesh out those years, make them real. I was 6 when the war ended and don’t remember a heck of a lot. I do remember blackouts, and my father’s warden outfit–helmet, gas mask, first aid book and kit–which hung in our den closet until they fell apart. I remember keeping silent during a radio broadcast of Roosevelt’s funeral. And the gas ration stickers on my dad’s car. Planes going so low overhead, I could see the bomb bay doors.

    A movie I’ll never forget: Harp of Burma, the story of a Japanese soldier who chooses to stay in Burma to bury the countless dead. Here’s the most memorable scene, starting at 6:00 on the video. So sorry; no English subtitles, but you can figure out what’s going on.

    https://theolympians.co/2015/08/15/the-pacific-war-ends-70-years-ago-today-theres-no-place-like-home/

    Liked by 1 person

  9. In a similar vein, I had vague memories of reading about the use of Japanese troops after the end of WW2 by the British in Indonesia and by the Americans in the Philippines, That was only scratching the surface, and the full story is at
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_Surrendered_Personnel

    Liked by 1 person

    • Oh, very true, John. They were used in China to help keep the Communist and Nationalist apart and to help get the remainder of Japanese back home. Once the Emperor gave his speech, it marked the beginning of a long alliance between Japan and the U.S.
      Thank you as always for contributing information!

      Like

    • I recall reading of a POW camp in Europe where the Allies didn’t have enough guards to secure that many prisoners. As I remember it, they created a buffer zone inside the overall perimeter and manned the former with newly “retired” SS men, carefully selected, and carrying their own sidearms. I don’t believe there were any escape attempts.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Such a good reminder that it’s not over until it’s all over. Then, of course, as one of your commenters has already noted, it was only at the beginning of another conflict.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. It seems to me that the clean-up would take about long enough for another war to begin. No wonder they had to up the beer ration! Your quarantine humor made me smile yet sad at the same time.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. From two cases to three cases of beer. . . Do I really want to leave? That’s a hard decision to make. It put a smile on my face. I need it today.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Good one, GP. I wonder if it really took three years to finish up everything. 33% increase in beer is good news indeed.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Great information, GP! They were in need preparing themselves for the after-war-community. Very interesting! Thank you! Michael

    Liked by 1 person

  15. The clean up and wrap up after war. With lots of still not so pretty parts. Thanks GP.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. As always, thank you for the continuing education, GP, all these things we never learned in school!

    The deer netting has come off of your Michael’s tree, as well as the others (including Michael Knight’s tree) up front. Some grass trimming and mulching left to do, and then I’ll take some photos.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I wish I could express how much I appreciate all you do and have done to honor our loved ones. My Michael never approved of cut flowers, he said all they do it die quicker. A growing, living tree (I know) would make him very happy!

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Good article and great humor. I needed it!

    Liked by 1 person

  18. This reminded me that my Dad was still in India until partition was completed. That was the most ‘action’ he saw during the whole war.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. 3 cases of beer a month? I need to forward this to my wife.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Your stories of the aftermath clearing up are good reminders

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Cute article GP. I like the cartoons, particularly the Quarantine humor. I may need to add it as part of my Coronavirus light series. When they upped the limit from 2 to 3 cases per man how long was the limit period–a day (watch out !) a week (perhaps), a month (easy squeezy lemon peasy)?

    Liked by 1 person

  22. There’s often a sense of nostalgia when leaving a place. Sometimes it’s because it was such a good experience, and sometimes it’s because it was so bad. Usually, it’s a mix. But the poem you posted here seems full of nostalgia –and pride!

    Liked by 2 people

  23. Lil more beer, for a lil more cheer. A salute to those in charge of such decisions.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Thanks for another very interesting piece. it is this sort of detail that before the Internet was available only to full-time scholars.

    Liked by 4 people

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