SOE / SIS Cooperation

secret-intelligence-service-sis-mi6-vector-logo

An interesting look back into the British operations in the CBI Theater during the Pacific War.

soe

The Special Operations Executive in Burma 1941-1945

secret-intelligence-service-sis-mi6-vector-logoMuch has often made of the fractious relationship between the Secret Intelligence Service (SIS,) and the Special Operations Executive (SOE).  The words used to sum up the problem between the two organisations is often something along the lines of SIS needed peace and quiet to collect intelligence, while SOE was hell bent on making loud bangs and disturbing the wasp’s nest.  In the Far East, SIS used the cover name of the Inter-Services Liaison Department (ISLD), a name which hints at working with other British units, but by the later years of the war, in Burma at least, the archives suggest a much more cooperative arrangement than mere liaison.

The relationship between SIS and SOE in Burma was not always smooth, like any relationship, but the two secret services were forced together for pragmatic reasons.  Probably the main reason for this is the lack of resources sent East due to…

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on March 30, 2020, in Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 60 Comments.

  1. As always you’re doing a great job

    Stay well

    Regards Thom

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thanks for reblogging this – very interesting. A link regarding Major Seagrim – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_Seagrim

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Hello GP…. it’s been too long, but it feels good to be here.
    I don’t see my reader very often, but, I’m mighty glad I did today. GP, you’re never boring.
    My Dad was in Burma, and several other places. What many fail to realize is the fact that our Dads weren’t gone on a years rotation….
    Also, supplys weren’t always on time, many times they were low on ammo, and cold. In fact, they must have been very cold at times. In this day and time, I think very few people can even imagine what they endured to defend their respective countries.
    GP, I Thank Our Dear Mighty GOD for all these people with hearts of solid gold, the size of locomotives, that fought side-by-side, selflessly defending their country and all the allied countries, They All Are My Heroes!!!!
    GP, Our Dads are mighty proud of you, and so am I..
    Keep up the good work,
    Sincerely,
    Robert

    Liked by 1 person

  4. The only way one is able to appreciate the emotional stress associated with critical field operations is to have experienced them. The question is often asked, “Why do young men so readily place themselves in harm’s way? Why do they do such extraordinary things?” The answer is complex, of course. There is pride in service, which can never be underrated when it comes to motivating men—but where the rubber meets the road, there is pride in unit, brotherly love with one’s mates, with whom one shares danger, injury, death. At this stage, a waving flag is the last thing anyone thinks about. It is this esprit de corps within small units that prompts the most extraordinary behaviors: accomplishing the mission, no matter what; it is taking care of one another … a willingness to give up one’s life for a friend … knowing that your mate would do the same for you. It is the strongest of all human bonds.

    I often think of these men from World War II … gutsy bastards all. I admire them, and I feel sadness for them as well. Their post-war life was no bed of roses. The war was quite suddenly over; the bond that they formed with others of their units was abruptly and permanently disrupted. In the aftermath of our more modern entanglements, psychologists have wondered why so many combat survivors engage in destructive personal behavior. They end up divorced from their wives, break off long-term engagements, isolate themselves from their parents and siblings, closet themselves from co-workers and high school or college chums. They too often drink more than they should, or worse. They never talk about “what happened.” Who can they talk to? Certainly not anyone who hasn’t experienced it. In combat, they had their mates. Afterward, they lived alone. This reminds me that we should love these men and women even more for what they did. They endured far more than anyone today realize.

    I very much enjoyed this article, and I thank ORCID for posting it, and you for reposting it. I’ve now bookmarked ORCID’s site.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I thank you sincerely for this comment and also with even more gratitude for your own service. Only someone who has experienced it can speak so eloquently about the feelings many can only try to imagine. I am certain Richard will appreciate you following his site and I hope we all can continue to honor such men in any way possible.

      Liked by 2 people

  5. Interesting history of MI6. We never learned this stuff in school.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Not relevant to this, but I thought you would find this video of the opening of the airbase in Alliance, NE interesting. They trained glider pilots and paratroopers used in the D Day invasion here.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Thank you for sharing this GP!

    Hope you are safe and well!
    We are still living life with abandon** here…just doing it indoors, in the backyard, on walks late at night or early morning, etc. 🙂
    (((HUGS)))
    PS…saw the movie 1917 recently. Interesting, good movie.
    PSS… **Living life with abandon doesn’t mean living recklessly but rather deciding that no matter what comes your way you are going to enjoy everything and you are going to make the best of what is going on around you.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m living according to the guidelines and hoping that ‘cabin fever’ doesn’t set in too quickly.
      I hope you and your family remain healthy and keep up that great attitude!!

      Liked by 2 people

  8. I find the work of intelligence agencies to be mind-boggling. It is so intricate and fraught with danger.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. I wonder how many people blog about WW II? Any idea, G. –Curt

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Always an intriguing topic. Thanks for the link, GP. I hope you’re feeling happy and sassy. Hugs on the wing.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Doing my best, Teagan. It sure doesn’t pay to gripe these days! haha My town just put the order through for us to be in house lock down until the end of May – I will be certifiably stir-crazy by then!!!

      Liked by 1 person

      • May? Sigh… I don’t get broadcast TV, or cable, so I’m rarely well informed, but I haven’t heard an end date here. NM gave the “stay at home” order pretty early in the game, when there were only a handful of “positive” cases. Hugs.

        Liked by 2 people

  11. I like the description of their differences. I can relate to that.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Thanks for the link, GP. When I was orking for the Police Special Ops in London until 2012, I had daily dealings with SIS, both 5 and 6. I was rather surprised to discover that so many of their operatives are still very ‘posh boys’, who went to Oxford or Cambridge universities. It seems that they have not yet looked to the working classes to boost recruitment. 🙂
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. When you in need of qualified information, cooperation is very useful. Hope our actual services will enlighten the origin of the Covid-19 too. Have you read the yesterday story on aphadolie.com? About a novel published in 2008, about a virus called Wuhan-400. The impossibility is the possibility of life. 😉 Thank you for this very interesting reblog. Michael.

    Liked by 2 people

  14. All’s not fair in love and war … as they say 🙂 another fascinating slice.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. That was fascinating…there is always inter service rivalry – and that includes how history is interpreted too.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Pierre Lagacé

    I will be reading…

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Thanks for the re-blog!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Your blog has a lot of very interesting material. It was my pleasure. I hope it brings you more steady readers.

      Liked by 1 person

      • My phone has had a steady beep of likes all day; never had so much attention loo!
        Thanks for all the kind comments too.

        Liked by 1 person

        • You and your site deserve them, or I wouldn’t have re-blogged it!
          The comments are still coming in to my site. Feel free to make a comment of your own to these people here, if you wish. I encourage the readers to talk to each other too (I can get to be boring and repetitive after a while). haha

          Liked by 1 person

          • I have not interacted much on here other than posting my work, so I’m just getting used to it now. For example, this comment of yours never appeared as a notification, so I didn’t see it! Thanks, I will try and respond by looking for comments now; don’t want to appear rude!

            Liked by 1 person

            • Understood. I had no idea how to work a blog when I first started either. If it wasn’t for terrific blogger friends like Pierre Lagace and Koji Kanemoto, I’d probably still be floundering!!!

              Like

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