Pearl Harbor is remembered

Crew of the USS Arizona

When diplomacy failed and power and greed survived – the Pacific skies went dark….

Hickam Field

Aerial view during the attack

Battleship Row, as seen by Japanese pilot during the attack

From the Smithsonian Museum……

USS Oklahoma stamp

This relic marks the movements before the U.S. was launched into WWII….To record when a piece of mail was processed aboard ship, the Navy used wooden postmark stamps.  This one bears an ominous date: 6 December 1941 PM.  It was recovered from the battleship Oklahoma after it was hit by several torpedoes, listed to a 45-degree angle, capsized and sank in the attack on Pearl Harbor.  The ship lost 429 sailors and Marines; one-third of its crew.

 

For a different view on the Pearl Harbor “surprise”……..

https://pacificparatrooper.wordpress.com/2016/12/07/the-other-pearl-harbor-story-kimmel-and-short/

For a wonderful Pearl Harbor poem, by Lee…..

https://mypoetrythatrhymes.wordpress.com/2018/08/

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Farewell Salutes – 

William Barnes – Brookston, IN ,& Lake Worth, FL; First Cavalry Division, Korea

John B. Coffey – Johnstown, PA & Miami, FL; Lt. Colonel (Ret.), US Army Air Corps, WWII ETO, 35 B-17 missions; B-52 crews in

U.S. Marine Mounted Honor Guard

Korea

James “Harp: Gerrity – Milford, CT; US Army Staff Sgt., WWII ETO, Bronze Star & 8th Army African Star

Leo Keninger – Ackley, IA; US Navy, WWII, PTO, Fireman 1st Class, USS Oklahoma, KIA (Pearl Harbor)

Robert Frank Rolls – Napier, New Zealand; 4th Field Regiment, WWII Sgt.

Oscar J. Tenores – Lemoore, CA; US Navy, Master-at-Arms

Orval Tranbarger – Chapel, MO; US Navy, WWII, PTO, Seaman 1st Class, USS Oklahoma, KIA (Pearl Harbor)

Robert Wade – Van Nuys, CA; US Army Air Corps, WWII ETO, (Ret. 22 yrs. Major)

Otto Wilner – Chicago, IL; US Army, WWII

James Wilson Jr. – Decatur, GA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, Sgt., radioman

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on December 7, 2019, in Current News, Home Front, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 130 Comments.

  1. Lovely post thnx to share

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Remembering all those who served.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. we were just at the WW2 memorial in DC and it never ceases to move ,me

    Liked by 1 person

  4. whew – that is an ominous date – and amazing to see the recovered post stamp

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Have you seen that recent movie GP? Wondered if it was any good?

    Like

  6. Every December 7th I remember this day

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Thank you to all who served and sacrificed.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Excellent comments and discussion, here. GP, my prayer is that history does not repeat itself. However, if it is not being taught….the same thing might not happen the same way but a variation could manifest. May the souls of our departed service men and women rest in peace.

    Liked by 1 person

    • A wonderful comment indeed, Emily Ann, thank you.

      Liked by 1 person

      • You’re welcome. You are doing the right thing by continuing to write the history and preserve the memories. Each generation has challenges, wars and victories to live through, symbolically and in reality. My concerns for the current generation is that they are brittle, they seem to lack a resilience and ability to go forth confidently and independently to take on adversity and challenges. This brittleness extends to engaging in challenging civil discourse. Although young, they are quick to censure anyone who does not agree with them and reluctant to listen or even consider another viewpoint. I have read that there may be a reinstatement of mandatory service to our country. It might not be a military draft, but more like the requirement that each young person must serve 1-2 years helping in projects at a local or national level. Then again it could be military, as well. While I like the idea of a domestic Peace Corps-type form of service, military service will cause a real upset should the draft be reinstated. The question is not being brought up enough and the anti-war movement has been too much out-of-sight.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Once again, I must commend you on your comment and your assessment of today’s generations. I’m afraid I have to agree. Plus, a mandatory military and/or home peace corps is exactly what is needed !!

          Liked by 1 person

  9. One of two salvaged bells of USS Arizona is on display in the bell tower, University of Arizona Student Union Memorial Center, Tucson, Arizona.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. A “surprise attack” like this is always going to be traumatic and stay in the collective memory for a very long time.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Thank you for this excellent rembrance, GP!

    I saw a link earlier I thought might be of interest to you.
    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2019/12/07/the-role-of-weather-on-december-7th-1941-and-a-little-known-important-indirect-benefit/

    Liked by 1 person

    • I can appreciate their reasoning and research, but back in those days, weather forecasting was not that accurate. December 7th (the 8th in Japan) was planned too far ahead for them to know how the weather would be on that morning.
      I appreciate your interest and hope you will always contribute information in the future. We should know everything to finally find the truth!

      Like

  12. I always think of that ringing phrase “a date which will live in infamy”, although if I were honest I would have to say that I always mis-remember it as “a day which will live in infamy”, a common mistake apparently.
    People often forget that Hitler declared war on the USA on December 11 1941, the main reason being, supposedly, that he wanted to be in the driving seat of history, deciding what was going to happen, rather than having others decide it for him.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hitler knew the bond between FDR and Churchill and after Japan attacked, he just got a jump on things. That day will always be infamous, but because FDR couldn’t have planned it better!!

      Like

  13. A terrible day in history. May their memories live forever.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. I liked the detail in your post so I hope you don’t mind if I link your post in mine.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Thank you for your service, you a member of the greatest generation.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. your farewell salutes have been my favorite Action and the powerful message. I love each name I say And talk awhile. My husband teases me and wants to partake in the next visi toRead: some names. http://www.sheilaclapkin.comto

    Thank you for allowing me to share and thank our soldiers and comrades for their blessings and gratitude. In their own journey today. >

    Liked by 1 person

    • I have always told you how much it means to me to have these men honored by people like you who care. I would like to hear your husband’s opinion after he visits. Patriotism should never go out of style!!

      Like

  17. As you mentioned diplomacy, FDR set policy. In his secret world, he knew his diplomatic decisions through the League of Nations would be the equivalent of the throwing down of a gauntlet, IMO.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. “My work is not a piece of writing designed to meet the needs of an immediate public, but was done to last for ever.”
    ― Thucydides,

    Wonderful, work once again GP.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. A wonderful tribute, GP!
    In the early 1990’s I met a man who had served in WW2 and was a Pearl Harbor Survivor. Jack and I became great friends! (I remember a funny story about when he and his wife got to meet President George W. Bush. 😀 )
    When Jack was in and out of the hospital and then in hospice care I would go sit by his bedside. We had some great talks. Such a dear, sweet man!
    Sadly, Jack died 16 years ago. He was in his 80’s. I still miss him.
    (((HUGS)))

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Your usual fine work! Did you see MIDWAY? Loved the card….thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

  21. And, to add one thing, it was — for my parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles — the ultimate “Where were you?” moment that Sunday morning. The radio, neighbors on porches, newspaper extras … Everyone alive that day remembers where they were when they heard the news. And then … something happened, and what happened is what you’ve written so compelling about here. Thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Although I was born almost 10 years after that day, I feel as if I “remember” it. And so long as we remember….

    Liked by 1 person

  23. It all happened 17 years before I was born but as the “day that will live in infamy” happened on what was to be my birthday I have always respected the anniversary. This is a fine tribute.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Reblogged this on Author DC Gilbert and commented:
    GP Cox posted a great remembrance for Pearl Harbor Day on his blog, Pacific Paratrooper. Please take the time to check out his great blog.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. GP, I knew I could count on you for this December 7 tribute. –Devastated by the recent horrible attack by the sailor gunman taking three lives. Best wishes to you & your family for Christmas & 2020. We are finally settled in our new townhouse. Wife Geri had major intestinal surgery August 12 after 3 months of agonizing pain for diverticulosis. Then 2 months recovery. Next surgery to reconnect without the colostomy “bag” in February. It has been a hard year for us. May you & family be well. Phil

    Liked by 1 person

    • You must be very happy to see 2019 fade into the sunset, eh? We are, so far so good, but as age and daily aches and pains, I keep waiting the axe to drop on a major ailment. Thank you for stopping by on this remembrance day, Phil.

      Liked by 1 person

  26. This was mdst into the heart of the USA

    Liked by 1 person

  27. When I worked at a senior center back in the ’90s, one of the members wrote an account of her experience at Pearl Harbor as a Navy wife. What I remember most about her account of that day was the length of time it took for the people on the island to understand and process what was happening. And then of course the utter panic and desperation of families to learn whether their loved ones were all right.

    Liked by 1 person

  28. As you might imagine, the days have blurred into one another a bit recently, and I was more than happy to have your reminder waiting for me. It’s been interesting to learn more of the history underlying the attack, as well as remembering the event itself.

    A young Texas man who died in the attack finally has been identified and has come home. Victor Tumlinson will be laid to rest today in South Texas. It’s a nice article, and interesting.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. I just saw the movie, Midway this week and thought it was a good depiction of the horror that was the attack on Pearl harbor. The story that Dan sent of the men going hand over hand on a rope to escape from the Arizona was depicted as well. Thanks for the tribute, GP.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Feel very sorry for Admirals Kimmel and Short, how dishonourabley they were treated.

    Liked by 1 person

  31. Thank you for these photographs. I recently read a book about an American ship that was torpedoed and sank during WWII. It had delivered parts of the nuclear bomb to a destination near to Japan. Many of the sailors were attacked by sharks as they were in the water for days as no-one know about the bombing. I learned a lot from that book as I don’t know that much about the US / Japanese part of the war.

    Liked by 1 person

  32. There was a British Military correspondent, Hector Bywater, who (in the 1920s) predicted the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor – which at the time was a small and unimportant facility for the Navy. He also plotted the island-hopping strategy ultimately used by Admiral Nimitz to roll the Japanese back to their home islands. There is a fine (but now out-of-print) book about what Bywater predicted: “Visions of Infamy” by William Honan. It was published by St. Martin’s Press. The ISBN is 0-312-05454-8.

    Liked by 1 person

  33. Nice Post, GP! I always remember Pearl Harbor day.

    Of course, it has absolutely nothing to do with the fact that on Dec 7, 1979, I flew to Weisbaden, Germany, or that coincidentally, on Dec 7, 1981, I flew to South Korea.

    Liked by 1 person

  34. There is only one kind of war that is justified. When a country is attacked, it has a right to defend itself and repel the aggressor. That’s what happened at Pearl Harbor. I agree with the first comment above. I have the same concern that young people are not being educated enough on the important events in history. Great reminder of a memorable day in world history, GP!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Being as I feel the subject of History is being down-played in the schools means more of us have to make the younger generations aware of it. (Our History Channel has gone haywire too. I saw a short documentary today that was riddled with misinformation. It sounded like a campaign rally for FDR!!! And Hitler built his empire with Alien (yes UFO type alien) data. Now come on people – get real here!!

      Liked by 1 person

  35. Great reminder. GP. We have to keep on reminding people especially the younger generation that freedom is not free. I put my flag up this morning.

    Liked by 1 person

  36. Thank you for the reminder if such a solemn day. I’m afraid that young people are not reminded enough of the day and it’s historical significance. Are schools shying from a responsibility to teach it? Are parents negligent? Is it just too long ago? Your posts are wonderful reminders.

    Liked by 3 people

  37. GP, Your attached article is worth a read. For my take on that day see https://mypoetrythatrhymes.wordpress.com/2018/08/.

    Liked by 1 person

  38. “When diplomacy failed and power and greed survived…” great way to sum up the situation that led to WWII. Beautiful tribute you have written with some tremendous historical photographs. My best to you,
    FBC

    Liked by 2 people

  39. Excellent post…..as usual….chuq

    Liked by 1 person

  40. Very nice tribute, GP. Every time I see photos of the destruction, I am amazed that we recovered and went on the offensive.

    Liked by 3 people

  41. Nice tribute, GP. We should never forget that day, or those who lost their lives in the cowardly attack.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 2 people

  42. Thank you very much, Anne!!

    Like

  43. Thank you very much.

    Like

  1. Pingback: Featured: Pearl Harbor is remembered // Pacific Paratrooper #AceHistoryDesk reports | ' Ace Worldwide History '

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