The Burma Jeep

 

Ford GTP, Burma Jeep

1943 Ford GTBA G622

The Ford GTB, called the “Burma Jeep”, was produced during WWII and was used primarily by the US Navy and Marine Corps and used exclusively in the Pacific Theater during World War II, many used on the “Burma Road”.  Its Ordinance Standard nomenclature number was G-622. Ford produced the low silhouette, short and maneuverable GTB in five models collectively called the G-622.

Total production of the 1-½ ton models was over 15,000 units, including these variants:

  • GTB truck, Cargo
  • GTBA truck, (US Navy)
  • GTBB truck, Wrecker, (Rare, only 50 produced)
  • GTBS truck, Bomb Service with crane (US Navy)
  • GTBC truck, Bomb Service with crane (USN, improved)

The Burma Jeeps were powered by a Ford 6-cylinder flathead gasoline engine producing 90 horsepower. They were 1-½ ton capacity, 4-wheel drive with a 4-speed transmission and a 2-speed transfer case. The Burma Jeep on display at Estrella WarBirds Museum has dual real wheels, 4-wheel drive, and a 10,000 lb Braden MU-6 winch.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Ford records indicate the paint color specified by the US Navy was “Ocean Gray” for all Navy contracts. The G-622 GTB vehicles were produced with and without a 10,000 lb. Gar Wood or Braden front mounted winch. All models except the GTBS had dual rear wheels. The cowl covering the engine separated the cab area, and the passenger seat was a light metal frame, which faced the driver, and could be enclosed by raising the windshield and installing a canvas top. The cargo truck had troop seats and bows for a canvas cover.

This truck (GTBA model) was probably built in July 1943 at the Edgewater, NJ Ford Plant.  After the war, it was purchased by the MacGillivry Ranch from the US Navy at Pt. Magu, and used as a ranch truck.  In 1998 it was donated to the Estrella Warbird Museum, and in 2008-2009, it was restored with funds provided by the McGillivry Family.  Restoration included complete brake overhaul, new passenger seat, upholstery, tires , and a complete paint job.

Pictures are courtesy of Mecum Auctions & Estrella Warbirds Museum.

###########################################################################################

Military Humor –

When you’re in a jeep and they’re in an armored vehicle with a gigantic robotic arm – you just may want to keep your mouth SHUT!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

###########################################################################################

Farewell Salutes – 

George Andrews – Norwich, CT; US Army, WWII, PTO, Graves Registration Unit

Daniel Benarcik Sr. – Wilmington, DE; US Army, WWII

Harold Costill – Clayton, NJ; US Navy, Pearl Harbor, fireman 3rd Class, USS West Virginia, KIA

Franklin Galloway – Rosman, NC; US Army, Korea, Co. E/187th RCT

John Kennedy – Lake Bluff, IL; US Army, WWII, Sgt.

Ernest Malone – Gloucester, LA; US Army, 101st Airborne Division, MSgt. (Ret. 25 y.)

Jack Reynolds – Chichester, ENG; Royal Army, WWII, ETO, Lt., 1st Airborne Division, POW

Jack Smith – Albuquerque, NM; US Navy, WWII, PTO, oil tanker navigator

Donald Steimel – Des Moines, IA; US Navy, WWII, PTO,troop carrier, USS Scout

Martin Vespo Sr. (100) – Peekskill, NY; US Navy, WWII, USS Carondelet

###########################################################################################

Advertisements

About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on September 12, 2019, in WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 99 Comments.

  1. OMG… the 1940’s… when Jeeps were Jeeps!

    Liked by 2 people

  2. What a compact design! I’d be tempted to put my mess tin on the engine and cook as I went 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  3. I used too own a 1995 Jeep Grand Cherokee 4×4 with a 318 C.I. 318 V8, but it was full-time four wheel drive and got very bad gas mileage!!

    I like mu old Jeep Grand Cherokee it had a lot of room!!

    Love Always, YSIC \o/

    Kristi Ann

    Liked by 3 people

  4. I love jeeps, have been driving them for years, one after another, but I could never imagine a jeep truck – wow, that’s some vehicle!

    Liked by 3 people

  5. Really neat vehicle. I’d love to have one! There is a Jeep at the US Army Quartermaster Museum at Ft. Lee, Virginia that you’d love to see. It was left in France after D-day. The French moved it to Viet Nam where it was capture by the North Vietnamese army and used by them. Re-captured by the US at some point and now sits proudly in the museum. They call it the Million-mile Jeep. The museum is well worth a visit if you’re ever within striking distance. The Eisenhower Van is there, along with many other artifacts from WWII and beyond. Linda L. Crowe lcrowe2807@gmail.com

    On Thu, Sep 12, 2019 at 6:54 AM Pacific Paratrooper wrote:

    > GP Cox posted: ” 1943 Ford GTBA G622 The Ford GTB, called the “Burma > Jeep”, was produced during WWII and was used primarily by the US Navy and > Marine Corps and used exclusively in the Pacific Theater during World War > II, many used on the “Burma Road”. It” >

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Hi gp, what was the main purpose of the passenger seat facing the driver? the reason is probably staring me in the face.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Those vehicles look like they were built to last. I’m sure it did make a good ranch vehicle.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. I always learn something on your site, GP. As for duct tape, my brother-in-law would agree! :)))

    Liked by 2 people

  9. Mecum Auctions? Wow, how unusual!

    Liked by 2 people

  10. It sounds to me as though this vehicle served during the war in much the same way that Landrover jeeps functioned in West Africa. Anyone (mostly organizations) who had a Landrover babied those things like a cook trying to keep a soufflé from going flat. More than once, they carried someone I knew across the Sahara. That wasn’t my cup of tea, but if I’d had to do it, I would have wanted to do it in a Landrover.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I love how you describe things!! I think we just never hear about these vehicles because in the movies we hear, “Get me a jeep: or “Use that truck over there”; all generic terms.

      Like

  11. I wonder why 6 cylinders and not 8 , over the Burma road and such. Thanks for the info, GP.

    Liked by 2 people

  12. The flathead 6… ahh a great motor.

    Liked by 2 people

  13. What a fantastic vehicle! And how ironic that once I’ve retired I find the perfect transportation to work through the cut-and-thrust world of the rush hour!

    Liked by 2 people

  14. The Ledo Road … I wonder if it is still there, and in use? Love that truck … and of course, duck tape!

    Liked by 2 people

  15. I love learning about the vehicles used during the war. My dad was a mechanic. I have a picture of him on a wrecker (doesn’t appear to be this model).

    Liked by 2 people

    • I’m happy I hit on a subject close to home. And now I know where you get your handy talents!!

      Liked by 1 person

      • He definitely started me on the road. Fixing things, building things and a confidence that “you can do this.” He tackled projects most people would say he had no business trying. And he would get them done.

        He talked about having to fix things without the right parts, and without the right equipment. He just knew he had to fix it. He never talked much about the war, but he shared some tidbits while teaching me how to work on my car.

        Liked by 2 people

  16. When I get a chance, I will email you with new information about my ‘special one’ in the Military.

    Liked by 2 people

  17. That’s a new one on me, GP. You had to know how to drive back then. No slipping it into ‘Auto’, and pressing ‘GO!’ 🙂
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 3 people

  18. That’s quite an impressive looking vehicle. The duct tape advice made me laugh. There are some people who need it too. 🤣

    Liked by 3 people

  19. I recall seeing the remains of one of these at Ft. McClellan AL. I remember looking at it, and wondering what the heck! At least now I know what I was looking at.

    Liked by 2 people

  20. Looks and sounds like a good off-road workhorse for the time. Duct tape. Is there anything it can’t fix?

    Liked by 3 people

  21. Imagine driving down the rode, G, with all of those bombs being pulled along behind you on the explosive truck! And they are all aimed at you! 🙂 –Curt

    Liked by 2 people

  22. Thanks, GP. Looks like a tough truck.

    Liked by 2 people

  23. Looks like a sturdy, reliable truck. Kudos!

    Liked by 3 people

  24. … hmmm … I may re-blog this as a Gear Head Tuesday post. I think many people don’t know about the “Burma Jeep”.

    Liked by 3 people

  25. It looks like the six by six vehicle my uncle drove for the US army after the liberation. Love the cartoons.

    Liked by 3 people

  26. Great piece on the Burma Jeep. I’ve always been fascinated by the story of this vehicle which has become a favorite of so many over the years. Keep up the great work! Hope you got through Dorian with minimal damage.

    Liked by 3 people

    • We got thru Dorian just fine, Steve. Thanks for asking. Our summer thunderstorms can be worse than we got. Hope it didn’t affect you!
      Glad you liked the Burma Jeep article – something different to talk about now and then, eh?

      Like

  27. How about the kind that became jeepney in the Philippines?

    Liked by 3 people

  28. Did Willow Run manufacture only B-24s? Would that be a Ford plant that also made these Burma trucks? I see you guessed it was made in NJ.
    There was a famous plant that was in New Orleans, I believe. Higgins, right? It made the amphibious vehicles used on the beaches of Normandy. Can you tell me about that connection? Have you posted about it already?

    Liked by 3 people

  29. Duct tape–the fix all found in every Redneck tool kit. Like the posting about the Burma Jeep.

    Liked by 2 people

  30. The passenger seat configuration seems counter-intuitive.

    Liked by 4 people

  31. Never heard of the Burma Jeep, even thought we lived in Burma in the 1980s. The duct tape item gave me a good laugh.

    Liked by 4 people

  32. Fascinating…I had not heard of that vehicle before…thanx for let me get to know it chuq

    Liked by 4 people

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: