How a Combat Unit Passes the Time While Standing Down

RRR-cover

Keeping the troops focused and in shape while not in combat….

IHRA

After approximately nine months of combat missions, the 22nd Bomb Group’s B-26s had reached the age of being designated war-weary. Due to the “Europe First” mentality, those fighting in the Pacific Theater had been receiving far fewer replacement aircraft than they desperately needed. In the case of the 22nd, this was a breaking point for the Group. Headquarters did not feel that men could safely fly in their B-26s any longer and ordered the Group to stand down on January 11, 1943.

Not long after the orders were received, the 19th and 33rd Bomb Squadrons were told that they were moving from Iron Range back to their old camp at Woodstock. The 500+ mile trip was filled with torrential downpours, delays and crowded conditions aboard the S.S. Paine Wingate. Once the men made it back to Woodstock, though, they happily found that their camp had been improved since their…

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on July 6, 2019, in Book Reviews, Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 50 Comments.

  1. They must have been exhausted, and the mental fatigue is worse I think.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. A well-earned rest, I agree

    Liked by 3 people

  3. You’re right that people today tend to focus on combat — if they focus on anything at all. Unless a family has one or more of its members in active service, the issue of their well-being while serving and after service isn’t much considered. There’s a sense in which our armed forces have become the equivalent of mercenaries; the attitude many people have is, “Go over there and fight, but don’t bother us. It’s not our war.” We could learn a few lessons from those earlier conflicts.

    Liked by 3 people

  4. I read this yesterday but somehow got sidetracked. My son is visiting from CA and you know how it is. I’m not a psychiatrist but R&R is good for mental acuity and morale. It refreshes the mind and body and sports is the best one in my opinion.

    Liked by 3 people

  5. Thank you for another wonderful article from the IHRA, GP! Keeping the troops in shape is a great goal, even if Marilyn Monroe is not singing for them. 😉 Michael

    Liked by 3 people

  6. Thanks for reblogging this, GP. It was good to see that the men got some well-earned rest, and made good use of that free time too.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 3 people

  7. Excellent insight into the leisure activities of the American crews in Australia, their presence left a lasting impression on Australia, pity the American nominee for Mayor wasn’t elected, who knows he may have gone on to be Prime Minister of Australia, and we would have become another State of America.
    Great re post gp.

    Liked by 4 people

    • haha, I can imagine the impressions left by some of our men on leave! I would not have minded if you had become another state (imagine that – a whole continent as a state!?!), but it’s better that you have independence.

      Liked by 2 people

  8. Most interesting link, GP.

    Liked by 4 people

  9. I would love to know what Dad did during his stay in Iceland and Scandinavia during WW2. Only got a few photos of them sitting and smoking.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Have you written to the National Archives NARA for his records? Here’s just a little snippet to start acquiring info….
      Britain needed her troops elsewhere, and requested that US forces occupy the island. The US agreed on 16 June 1941. The 1st Provisional Marine Brigade of 194 officers and 3,714 men from San Diego under the command of Brigadier General John Marston sailed from Charleston, South Carolina on 22 June to assemble as Task Force 19 (TF 19) at Argentia, Newfoundland:[8] TF 19 sailed on 1 July. On 7 July, Britain persuaded the Althing to approve an American occupation force, and TF 19 anchored off Reykjavík that evening. The United States Marine Corps commenced landing on 8 July, and disembarkation was completed on 12 July. On 6 August, the United States Navy established an air base at Reykjavík with the arrival of Patrol Squadron VP-73 PBY Catalinas and VP-74 PBM Mariners. United States Army personnel began arriving in Iceland in August.[8]

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  10. Many smaller wars have happened since WWII. We can learn ftom past war experiences especially for where we are headed. All of your shares are greatly are appreciated. But it seems as though generations of this day have no understanding of country. Many may not understand the direct impact of the USA’s historical perspective, with our initial bonding being our allegiance. The torch has fallen and should be lifted high.

    Liked by 3 people

    • You would think, right?! The wars today are fought to have the least amount of civilian involvement – politically correct wars – and sorry to say – that is exactly why we can’t win them. Our civilian population is barely notified when we lose a service member, wars don’t affect them, so they don’t think about them or sacrifice anything for country – it is definitely a “ME GENERATION” out there!!!

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  11. Boredom is as bad as too much activity, don’t you think?

    Liked by 2 people

  12. Being stood down is always a blessing. Time for some much needed R ‘n R!

    Liked by 4 people

  13. Dang! And we just played Pinochle!

    Liked by 3 people

  14. Off duty entertainment is an important part of what all of the Armed Services provide. World War II was when many of these recreation activities got their start. I was a Morale, Welfare Recreation (MWR) specialist for the first half of my career (since post libraries were part of MWR). The idea was to provide more wholesome activities for troops (left to their own devices they were inventive in making alcohol, visiting ladies of ill repute, etc.) The main areas were sports, arts and crafts, theater, libraries (of course), and local tours and travel (if the environment permitted.) Some of the MWR specialists were killed during conflicts.

    Liked by 3 people

  15. One of the very few pictures I have from my dad’s time in the Philippines is when they were hanging out, playing baseball.

    Liked by 2 people

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