Poems

I think we are all in need of a more light-hearted post by now …..

 

A FRIEND, YOUR AMERICAN M.P.

 

 When soldiers go out and have some fun,

 They always forget about some other one.

 That someone’s on duty every day,

 To see that these soldiers are safe at play.

 They call him names that we can’t print,

 But they should sit down and try to think.

 These men are detailed for this tough job,

 So why go around and call him a snob?

 When a guy’s in trouble, and things look bad,

 They call on this fellow, and then he’s not bad.

 At the end they will say, “this fellow took up for me.”

 And the fellow that did it was your American M.P.

 One thing to remember fellows when you’re down and out,

 There’s a fellow that will help you if he hears you shout.

 He will stand beside you and fight like hell.

 So do the right thing, and treat him well.

 Just remember fellows on your holiday,

 One of your buddies can’t go out and play.

 You call him an outcast, and other names,

 But he’s your buddy, just the same.

 We envy no one, try never to do harm.

 We’re here to keep you safe, in every form.

 So if you see us on duty, please don’t get mad.

 Remember we’re here for you, and that M.P.’s aren’t bad.

     – S/Sgt. GODFREY J. DARBY

 

WAR AND HELL

 

 When reception is poor and the signal stinks

  And you think of bed and your forty winks

  And the PE coughs and pulls high jinks

  That ain’t war, that’s hell.

 When your grease is cold and your rear guns fails

  With a Zero riding each of your tails

  And you curse your luck and bite your nails

  That ain’t war, that’s hell.

 When you’ve hiked all night and your feet are sore

  And your throat’s all parched and your clothes are tore

  And the C.O. says just ten miles more

  That ain’t war, that’s hell.

 When you’re climbing a hill and the motor’s hot

  And the left read blows like a pistol shot

  You hope its a back fire but you know it’s not

  That ain’t war, that’s hell.

 When the whistle blows for the day’s mail call

  And you’re sweating a letter from your butter-ball

  And Jones gets a card and they say that’s all

  That ain’t war, that’s hell.

 When the chow bell rings and you hope for ham

  But the guy who cooks don’t give a damn

  So all you get is a slab of Spam

  That ain’t war, that’s hell.

 But when the war’s been won by your nation

  And you dream of home with anticipation

  But the order says Army of Occupation

  Brother that will be hell.

     – Sgt. CARL BROOKMAN

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More Military Humor –

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Bennie Adams Jr. – Barnwell, SC; US Army Air Corps, WWII, Korea & Vietnam, SM Sgt., Bronze Star

H. Carl Boone – Atlantic City, NJ; US Navy, WWII, ETO, LST, Purple Heart

Andrew Curtis Jr. – Yakima, WA; US Army Air Corps, WWII,B-24 pilot, 15th Air Force

John Eilerman – Fort Laramie, OH; US Navy, WWII

George Fuchs – Pinehurst, NC; US Army Air Corps, WWII, 152nd Artillery/11th Airborne Division

Allan Goodwin – Houston, TX; US Merchant Marines, WWII

Michael Hession III – Harwich, MA; US Coast Guard, WWII, PTO

Eileen “Gertie” Joyner – NYC, NY; US Army WAC; WWII, nurse

Ernest Reid – Toronto, CAN; RC Air Force, WWII, Flight Sgt.

Shirley Zumstag – Bradenton, FL; US Navy WAVE, WWII

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on February 25, 2019, in WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 110 Comments.

  1. Great poems! Thoughtful!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Nathan AM Smith

    Thank you for sharing this!

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Beautiful picture of your thought.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Nice words.
    I also write poems and would love to have your suggestions on it. Please check my blog : http://www.alienicpoems.wordpress.com

    Liked by 2 people

    • I must tell you first hand that I am not a professional writer and further from a poet. I read your poem and I like it, so I clicked the ‘Like’ button. You need an actual poet for any suggestions of improvement.

      Like

  5. Thanks for your like of my post, ” Israel 8 – Exodus 12-13;” you are very kind.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Thoroughly enjoyed both those writings gp, and both are virtually spot on with their story line.
    Cheers.

    Liked by 3 people

  7. Loved the poems ❤ ! Yes, light-hearted is needed now.

    Liked by 3 people

  8. I love your poems. ❤️️ So special

    Liked by 3 people

  9. I love the contrastings!

    Liked by 4 people

  10. I was out of town for four days, so of course am behind on my reading, but these poems were well worth your posting and my reading. There’s a tendency for the ‘literary sorts’ and academic writers to turn their noses up at poetry like this (it rhymes!), but there’s something about it that not only communicates feeling, it’s also easier to memorize and share. These were great — thanks so much!

    Liked by 4 people

    • Not only were these poems about and for the military, but rhyming poetry is my favorite. I have trouble finding the beat when it doesn’t. I’m glad you liked them, Linda!

      Like

  11. Great post….love the poems….

    Liked by 4 people

  12. Well, I don’t know which navy wears flip-flops but I do hope it’s not ours!

    Liked by 4 people

  13. Guess thoughts of war can never really be light-hearted. It was a terrible time no matter how you looked at it.

    Liked by 4 people

  14. That certainly did lighten things up a bit! Thanks!

    Liked by 4 people

  15. Love this post! Thank you for sharing Darby and Brookman’s poems with us!
    HUGS!!! 🙂

    Liked by 4 people

  16. Thank you for sharing excellent poetry, GP!

    Liked by 4 people

  17. Poetry … the language of the heart.
    Yeah. Glad there’s somebody out there.

    Liked by 4 people

  18. Interesting perspective, G. A bit more realism than Beetle Bailey I’d say. –Curt

    Liked by 4 people

  19. Good ones. I especially liked the last.

    Liked by 4 people

  20. Hey, never heared about such poems, till now! Thank you, GP! Great job! Michael

    Liked by 4 people

  21. I happen to like Spam
    and always cringe when it’s maligned
    plus I’m sure it contains ham
    and I like that it’s canned.

    Liked by 4 people

  22. One of my grandfathers, in the army during the post-WWII occupation of Japan, talked about the MP’s having him and the other corporals assist them in sweeps of the off-limit bathhouses. He said the PFC’s always managed to slip through their fingers somehow, but the 1st Lt’s always got nabbed.

    Liked by 4 people

  23. These are good. I can’t even imagine being assigned to the occupation force.

    Liked by 4 people

  24. One should think that poetry would die in times of war, but as your post shows it is alive and well and gives soldiers an opportunity to express their thoughts and feelings.

    Liked by 4 people

  25. I remember a Bob Hope/Bing Crosby song. “Oh, it’s great to be a real MP. He can’t stop the Army with a no-no no. A steady man, a rugged man, the only man in the world that can tell the U.S. Army where to go.” Fun post.

    Liked by 4 people

  26. Poetry was a big thing in those days, good pair here GP.

    Liked by 4 people

  27. Wonderful poems telling us how life was at the front in an entertaining way. Some of those soldiers were really creative like those “Battling Bastards of Bataan”.

    Liked by 4 people

  28. That Godfrey fellas gotta great last name. LOL

    Liked by 4 people

  29. A tough job! Always unpopular. But necessary.

    Liked by 4 people

  30. Entertaining indeed, GP. Military Police are not at all popular here. They are known as ‘Redcaps’, because the top of their military caps is red. Quite a lot of them go on to join the civilian police, following their army service.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 4 people

  31. Much appreciated, Ian.

    Like

  1. Pingback: FEATURED BLOGGER REPORT: Poems By Pacific Paratrooper #AceHistoryDesk reports | ' Ace Worldwide History '

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