PT Boat report – July 1945

New Guinea, July 1945

The final invasion of the SW Pacific area was made on 1 July, 1945, when troops of the 7th Australian Division were landed at the oil port of Balikpapan in SW Borneo.  The amphibious attack group commander wanted PT boats patrolling the beachs beforehand to prevent the enemy from erecting obstacles.

Accordingly, 4 Pt’s of Squadron 10, 4 from Squadron 27 and the patrol boat tender USS Mobjack, under Lt. Cmdr. Tappaan, were dispatched.  They strafed and rocketed the beaches to keep the enemy away.

Mindanao, 1945, PT-150 in foreground

The Varuna arrived with 8 more PT’s and the task unit was brought to full strength with the arrival of 7 more boats.  On the night of 9/10 July, Lt. A.W. Allison’s PT-73 and Lt. C.S, Welsh’s Pt-359 were sent to destroy a reported enemy radar station on Balabalagan Island.  The boats did a thorough job of strafing huts and buildings and 130-foot tower, in the face of machine-gun and rifle fire.

When PT boats 163, 167 & 170 returned to the island, they found all enemy equipment destroyed, 6 fresh graves and one dead Japanese soldier.

PT Advance Base, Brunei Bay, Borneo 1945

The western coast of Celebes was where the PT boats found Japanese shipping.  On 22 July, Lt. Roger Waugh in Pt-163, Lt. Baker in PT-174 and Lt. Harrison’s PT-170 made a daylight strike on Paloe Bay, Celebes, along with RAAF Kittyhawk fighters.  The combined effort destroyed 4 prahaus, damaged a hotel, dock and many houses in Dongala town.  The fires could be seen 30 miles out at sea.

PT Cradles on USS Oak Hill (LSD-7), Espiritu Santo Is. 23-24 July 1945

The period of June to July 1945 was characterized by the disappearance of PT targets around the SW Pacific except for Morotai, where the boats continued to encounter small enemy craft because of the static land situation and large enemy concentrations on Halmahera.

As the Philippine campaign drew to a close, plans were made to transfer squadrons and tenders from the 7th Fleet to the Pacific Fleet for operations in the north.

Espiritu Santo Is., Boat Base # 2, July 1945

The original plans for the Japanese invasion, Operation Olympic, did not include PT boats, but the Commander Amphibious Force Pacific Fleet asked Commodore Bates to submit a plan for the use of 200 along the Japan coast.

Click on images to enlarge.

#############################################################################################

Military Humor – 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

#############################################################################################

Farewell Salutes – 

James Brennan Sr. – Lawrence, MA; US Army, WWII, Korea & Vietnam (Ret. 32 y.)

Kenneth Chesak – El Paso, TX; US Army, Vietnam, 82nd Airborne Division

Leo Devane – Albany, NY; US Navy, WWII, ETO, Petty Officer

Norman Garfield – Philadelphia, PA; US Army, Sgt., Signal Corps

Olivia Hooker (103) – Tulsa, OK; US Coast Guard SPARS, WWII

Leo Kornblath – Roslyn Heights, NY; Civilian, US Navy, WWII, minesweeper draftsman / US Air Force, B-29 Flight Engineer

Joe Lauzon – Sault Ste. Marie, CAN; RC Army, WWII, Queen’s Own Rifles, 3rd Division

Irving Levin – Stuart, FL; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO,B-29 Flt. Engineer, 20th Air Force

Kenneth Sanborn – Macomb County, MI; US Air Force

Gillis Wilder – Corbin, KY; US Navy, WWII

+++++          +++++

my-war.jpg

Images is courtesy of: https://mywarjournals.com/

Dylan J. Elchin – Hookstown, PA; US Air Force, Afghanistan, SSgt., 26th Special Tactics Squadron, 2- Purple Hearts, KIA

Eric M. Emond – Brush Prairie, WA; USMC/ US Army, Afghanistan, Sgt.1st Class, 1/3rd Special Forces Group (21 y. served), KIA

Andrew P. Ross – Lexington, VA; US Army, Afghanistan, Captain, 1/3rd Special Forces Group, KIA

#############################################################################################

Advertisements

About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on November 29, 2018, in Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 77 Comments.

  1. PT standing for Patrol Torpedo Boat, right? And made of mahogany? –Curt

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Ik had verwacht dat die Pt boten erg groot waren maar lees hier dat ze dun en klein waren dat had ik me dus helemaal fout in geschat.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Catch up was impossible this time, GP, so I am diving back in again, and hoping the rest of this year is quieter. Thank you, as always, for posting these stories.

    Michael’s tree is still doing well, and has been netted for the winter to discourage deer.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Every serving combatant has a unique story; a story that should never have to be written; yet it is one that repeats itself throughout the history of mankind – to quote Bob Dylan “When will they ever learn?”

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I need to go see if I can find some episodes of McHale’s Navy anywhere

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Out of all of the dangers of WW2 naval warfare, I think being a crew member on a PT Boat is the scariest to think about. No thick metal hull to try and keep you alive.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Somehow, it’s sadder to hear about stuff like this happening so close to the end. Tour piece also brought home the countless different wars fought, all over the world; each one unique.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I only have one association with PT boats — PT109, of course. Where was JFK in all this?

    Liked by 1 person

    • JFK had been sent home and Papa Joe got him a job as a journalist. 29 July 1945, JFK wrote the article “Eamon de Valera Seeks To Unite All Ireland” for the New York Journal American.

      Like

  9. Plywood PT boats and gliders…. Amazing what we used to win the war and how exposed and brave men had to be to carry the fight to the enemy in those fragile craft!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Such a shame they had to go on. And that Afghanistan picture is chilling

    Liked by 1 person

  11. It’s getting towards the worst part of the war. The period towards the end, when the enemy, as one comedian used to say. “is dead but he won’t lie down”.
    Nobody wants to be a casualty then, and what tragedies for those who fell in the last few months.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Every year, there’s an antique car and wooden boat show here at the yacht club where I do most of my work. There’s always some sort of military vessel included, even if it’s a modern Coast Guard cutter, but now and then a PT boat shows up. I can’t remember the boat’s number, and I can’t find a photo from a past show, but it was so interesting to see. If one shows up in a future show, I’ll get some photos for you.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. I can’t imagine being in those small PT boats and trying to attack targets bigger than themselves…those warriors have my respect!

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Amazing amount of destruction considering they were not on land but in the water.

    Liked by 2 people

  15. We have one of those WW2 vintage PT boats down the street in Fall River, at a place called Battleship Cove. It’s a fascinating place, if you ever find yourself in southeastern coastal Massachusetts.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. I always had a real fascination with PT boats. As a kid, I thought it would be really cool to get plans for one and build it as an extremely awesome pleasure craft!

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Sir, thank you for the history lesson, I am going to reblog this article for you.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. That is ominous–six fresh graves and one dead Japanese. I’ll draw my own conclusions.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. I would imagine a large group of those boats could be quite intimidating.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. I always found the idea of those small gun boats so frightening. It makes life feel so fragile.
    Thanks for another insightful post, GP. Hugs!

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Guess PT duty was not quite as hazardous later in the war, since this report does not mention damages or casualties. Interesting read.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. the 3 killed in Afghanistan have been identified……
    The deceased are:

    Army Capt. Andrew Patrick Ross, 29, of Lexington, Virginia.

    Army Sgt. 1st Class Eric Michael Emond, 39, of Brush Prairie, Washington.

    Air Force Staff Sgt. Dylan J. Elchin, 25, of Hookstown, Pennsylvania.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. When you get close to those motor torpedo boats, and realise how small and flimsy they were, it just increases the admiration for the crews that fought so bravely in such tiny craft.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 3 people

  24. I’m honored you consider these articles worth reblogging.

    Like

  1. Pingback: FEATURED BLOGGER REPORT: PT Boat report – July 1945 By Pacific Paratrooper #AceHistoryDesk reports | ' Ace Worldwide History '

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: