Thanksgiving – Then and Now

WWII vs Afghanistan

THEN – WWII

Stanley Collins, US Navy: “I was on submarine duty in the Pacific in the year 1943. We were in the area off the cost of the Philippines. I remember having a complete turkey dinner on Thanksgiving. While the turkeys were cooking, the submarine took a dive. We went down too steeply and the turkeys fell out of the oven onto the deck. The cook picked them up and put them back into the oven — and we ate them, regardless of what may have gotten on them as a result of their fall. That meal was so good!”

Ervin Schroeder, 77th Infantry Division, 3rd Battalion, I Company, US Army: “On Thanksgiving Day, we made our landing on Leyte Island in the Philippines very early in the morning. We therefore missed our dinner aboard ship. Somewhere down the beach from where we landed, the Navy sent us ham and cheese sandwiches. My buddy happened to get one of the sandwiches and brought it back to our area. I was complaining to him for not bringing one back for me when he started to have stomach cramps… At this point, I shook his hand and thanked him for not bringing me a sandwich.”

Bill Sykes of Plymouth, Combat Engineers and then 1095th Engineer Utility Company, Command SoPac, US Army Engineers 1942-1945:

“The Thanksgiving dinners were served on trays. (My first one, with the Combat Engineers, was served in mess kits. That doesn’t work too well.) They had cranberry sauce, stuffing, the whole thing. It was a good meal. But the feeling of Thanksgiving wasn’t there. The meal was there, but the feeling of Thanksgiving wasn’t. I guess you couldn’t have Thanksgiving when you were overseas. There wasn’t much to be thankful for. It was sad. Although, I guess there was some thankfulness, at least you were still alive!”

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

NOW – 2018

This year, service members received:
— 9,738 whole turkeys
— 51,234 pounds of roasted turkey
— 74,036 pounds of beef
— 21,758 pounds of ham
— 67,860 pounds of shrimp
— 16,284 pounds of sweet potatoes
— 81,360 pies
— 19,284 cakes
— 7,836 gallons of eggnog

“All of [U.S. Army Central Command’s] food, with very few exceptions, has to come from U.S. sources and moved into the theater,” said Sgt. Maj. Kara Rutter, the ARCENT culinary management NCO in charge. “There are also challenges with the quantity of the food that we’re getting. When you talk about buying 23,000 pounds of shrimp, obviously that affects the entire market.

“We also have to ensure we’re respecting our host nations’ cultures. In some countries, we might not be able to serve certain foods because of cultural and religious considerations.”

Soldiers operating in isolated locations will also receive a hot Thanksgiving meal, Rutter added, thanks to food service professionals in the U.S. who prepared a series of “Unitized Group Rations,” which is “basically a meal in a box.”

“Being away from home during the holidays is very difficult,” Rutter said. “There are a lot of Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, and Marines who frankly are away from home for their first Thanksgiving, and they are doing some difficult things.

“We want them to be able to take a minute, take a knee, and eat the same type of food that their families are eating 9,000 miles away, all while thinking of them at the same time.”

#############################################################################################

Military Humor and something to think about – 

humor from Afghanistan

 

 

 

 

 

 

Turkey will travel

 

“And you were whining about sitting next to Uncle Milt!!”

 

 

 

 

Military turkeys

#############################################################################################

Farewell Salutes – 

Richard Arcand – Chelmsford, MA; US Navy, WWII & Korea, Lt.Comdr. (Ret.)

Robert Browning – Cary, NC; US Army Air Corps, WWII, ETO, 194th GIR/17th Airborne Division

Dick Cadic – NJ; US Army, WWII, T-3 Sgt., telegraph

Thomas Fussell – Alamogordo, NM; US Air Force, Vietnam, Lt.Col., fighter pilot

Edward Gould – Christchurch, NZ; RNZ Army # 61449, WWII, 44/8th Army

Norman Kroeger – Hartford, WI; US Navy, WWII, USS New Mexico

Vincent Losada – San Antonio, TX; US Army Air Corps, WWII, ETO, B-17 Bombardier, 487th Bomb Group

Larry McConnell Sr. – Des moines, IA; US Army, WWII & Korea

Walter Shields – Brooklyn, NY; USMC, WWII

Cowden Clark Ward – Fredericksburg, TX; Civilian pilot, founder of “Freedom Flyers”

#############################################################################################

 

 

Advertisements

About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on November 22, 2018, in First-hand Accounts, Home Front, Korean War, SMITTY, Uncategorized, Vietnam, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 159 Comments.

  1. Thanks for your like of my post, “Israel 1 – A Pagan Breeds A Nation;” you are very kind.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. My brother and uncle were in the Navy! My brother was a Nuclear Engineer.

    My dad was in the Air Force.

    Right now, I have a loved one in the Army. I’m not sure if I’m allowed to say what he does because of OPEC Rules.

    God Bless our Heroes!

    I’m going to make another concrete poem for all of my heroes 😊

    Nika

    Liked by 1 person

  3. The Navy, Marines, Air Force, and Army are all my heroes! ♥️♥️♥️

    Liked by 1 person

  4. A moving reminder of all those who have sacrificed for our freedoms.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. It is a great post! It is an important tribute to who fought for the country and the democracy. You have an awesome site. I hope you will visit my travel blog: https://my-anasa.com/
    Thank you!

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Bet the turkeys don’t think the same about all that, but I love these posts and the memories evoked.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Reblogged this on The Tactical Hermit and commented:
    I love Post like this that put it all into perspective.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. I just wanted to take a moment over this Thanksgiving Weekend Holiday to THANK YOU GP for this awesome blog!

    As a Veteran, it is extremely important to me personally to keep the memory and spirit of not only the WW2 Generation but ALL those Marines, Soldiers,, Sailors and Airmen (in that order, LOL) that came before us and ‘laid it on the line’ so that other may be free.

    Keep up the Good Work GP and Always Know you have a brother here in Texas supporting you!

    Stay Armed and Dangerous!
    The Tactical Hermit

    Liked by 3 people

    • I thank you very much for those words. It is people such as yourself that help to make this blog what it is! While your site tries to show people how to stay safe today.
      I thank you for that!
      Enjoy the holidays!!

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Dat waren andere tijden want zullen de soldaten op dat moment met weemoed aan hun warme thuis gedacht hebben

    Liked by 2 people

  10. Enjoyed reading this post and seeing the food items received.

    Liked by 2 people

  11. Wonderful post, GP. The comparison was remarkable. Happy Thanksgiving to you. 🦃

    Liked by 2 people

  12. That’s a whole lot of turkey 🙂 keeping the family together so to speak.

    Liked by 2 people

  13. Grateful for all those who fought for our freedom.
    Hope you and your family had a lovely Thanksgiving.

    Liked by 2 people

  14. All the best of the season to you GP. Happy Thanksgiving

    Liked by 2 people

  15. It is really important for a country to support its service personnel overseas (They don’t make the policies.) And one of the best ways of doing this is to give them the means to celebrate traditional the festivals of the year. 9,738 whole turkeys and 51,234 pounds of roasted turkey should go a long way to achieving that!

    Liked by 2 people

  16. How wonderful! Hope you and your family had a Happy Thanksgiving! 🙂
    HUGS!!! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: