Gen. Kenney’s report – Reorganization – July 1945

18 July 1945, Okinawa, 90mm AAA-gun emplacement

During the night of 1 July, I found out that the was on Okinawa was not quite over.  Around midnight a party of Japs blundered into a fight with the guards about 50 yards from my tent. I put my pistol on a chair beside the bed.  The shooting died down a little later and I went to sleep.  The next morning, as I was taking off for Manila, Col. ‘ Photo’ Hutchison told me that he had had another battle going on during the night near his HQ.

On July 10th it was announced from Washington that the B-29s in the Marianas would form the 20th Air Force, under Gen. Twining and that those operating from Okinawa would form the 8th Air Force, under Jimmy Doolittle.  The 8th & 20th would together be called the United States Strategic Air Force, with Gen. Spaatz in command.

American soldier, Okinawa

On the same day, Nimitz turned over control of the 7th A.F. to the Far East Air Forces and told the Marine Fighter Wing at Okinawa to operate in conjunction with our (Army) show there.

On the 12th, Lord Louis Mountbatten and a few members of his staff flew from India to Manila for a conference with MacArthur.  We briefed him on the coming Olympic Operation and his staff in turn gave us the details of the proposed British operation to recapture Singapore.

Mountbatten wanted some bombing assistance at that time, if we had any to spare.  MacArthur asked me what I could do.  I gave him the details about the Australians and our B-24s and Mountbatten was quite pleased.

Kyushu Island, July 1945 bombing

All through July we kept moving aircraft into Okinawa from both the 5th and 7th Air Forces.  Generals Whitehead and Tommy White set up their HQ on the island and began the final sweep of Japanese shipping from the Yellow Sea and the Straits of Tusishima, between Japan and Korea.

In conjunction with the B-29 from the Marianas, who were battering the big cities of Japan apart and burning them down, we concentrated our attacks on the island of Kyushu, smashing airdromes, burning up gasoline stocks and wrecking the railway centers, bridges and marshalling yards.

The attacks were being made with a ever-increasing weight, as airdromes were being finished on Okinawa, allowing us to move the aircraft forward from the Philippines and the Marianas.

By the end of July, on an average day, when weather permitted large operations, there would be over 1500 of my airplanes operating along the line from Japan to Formosa to Shanghai to Borneo and the Netherlands East Indies.  Of this number around 600 bombers, strafers and fighters would be attacking targets in Japan itself.

It was a far cry from the days back in 1942, when a raid of 50 or 60 planes was such big news that we boasted about it for days!

Click on images to enlarge.

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Military Humor – 

Great Lakes Training 1945

From: David Hart at https://mywarjournals.com/

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Farewell Salutes – 

Paul Connelly – Tulsa, OK; US Army Air Corps, WWII / US Navy, Korea

Brian Hawkins – Pasadena, TX; US Army, 143rd/36th Division, medic

Herbert Hill – Shreveport, LA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, B-24 nose gunner

Ellis Lindsey – SC; US Army, 511th/11th Airborne & 504th/82nd Airborne divisions

William Mercantonio – East Orange, NJ; US Army Air Corps, WWII, Korea, TSgt.

Earl Ray – Cadillac, MI; US Army, MP

Maureen Rodgers – London, ENG; British Navy WRENS, Hut 11 decoder, Bletchley Park

Roland Rioux – Vero Beach, FL; US Army Air Corps, WWII, ETO / Korea, Cuban Missile Crisis

Nicholas Vollweiler – Pleasant Valley, NY; US Army, K-9 instructor, Japan Occupation

Sam Wagner – Tonville, CO; US Army, WWII, PTO, Bronze Star

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About GP

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GP is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on November 15, 2018, in Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 79 Comments.

  1. The photo with the two hungry children and the caring soldier caught my heart. The one who is not spoon fed is looking at his brother

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thanks for all The information you gave. Very usefull.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I love those first few lines. The fighting was 50 yards away so he put his pistol on the table. He must have been through quite a bit to be that relaxed about it.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. That “drink from the hose” cartoon is so funny. I used to drink from the hose all the time when I was a kid. Between that and going barefoot in the dirt — not to mention eating fruit straight from the trees and veggies straight from the garden — it probably helps to explain why my immunity levels are solid. Down here in hot ol’ Texas, you do need to let hoses run for a bit before drinking, though, just to let the algae get washed out.

    I keep thinking about 1,500 planes and 600 bombers. I can’t imagine. Of course, that probably was part of the point: attacking in such numbers that the Japanese couldn’t imagine what was happening — or what might be coming next.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. 1500 aeroplanes in the air at once attacking the Japanese. I bet they were beginning to regret Pearl Harbor.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I should think they had that feeling earlier than this, but there was no convincing the Japanese military. I’m glad you found the post interesting. (boring statistics but necessary once in a while to keep things organized and comprehensible.)

      Like

  6. So much destruction, it’s shocking. Its good to remember that such extreme measures were once necessary and to avoid falling into to conflict again.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Love that “looking forward” envelope from Great Lakes !

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Very interesting. Never knew this level of detail. Keep up the good work.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. GP, I was reading with interest General Kinney’s entire report on Reorganization, July, 1945, a crucial time leading up to the culmination of the war in the Pacific theater, which I find fascinating. And early on in the report he says, “On July 10th it was announced from Washington that the B-29s in the Marianas would form the 20th Air Force, under Gen. Twining.” Since my father was a medic in Saipan for 14 months, Sept 1944-Nov 1945, I pulled out his American Legion hat. I knew it had his unit’s patch on the hat. And there it was; the globe with gold wings with a star at the wings base & the unit 20 !!! I was blown away! You told me a long time ago to write about my father’s service. I would have to ask my nephew to return my father’s scrapbook I gave him years ago. Thanks for this post! Phil

    Liked by 2 people

  10. Hearts and flowers.
    Sheila

    Liked by 2 people

  11. Excellent, GP. I enjoyed the General’s perspective.

    Liked by 2 people

  12. Fascinating post.Regards.

    Liked by 2 people

  13. Those mass-bomber raids must have been a sight to see, and terrible to be the target of.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 2 people

  14. It’s not unusual to see an American soldier taking care of the enemy’s children (as in the picture you included). I was thinking I never see that happening in the reverse but then, my brain finally got to the point that we don’t have battles around our children.

    Good post, GP. I love reading about Okinawa.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Yes, our children haven’t had to go through that – Thank heavens!!
      I know why you love reading about Okinawa!! Will either of your children be home for the holidays?

      Like

  15. “Of this number around 600 bombers, strafers and fighters would be attacking targets in Japan itself.”
    Given that the reference was to mean perhaps 200 of those were B-29’s, with their extensive bomb loads – Wow!

    Liked by 2 people

  16. I love the insights, the cooperative nature of the war and how it changed post war too. In Australia drinking from the hose was quite normal.

    Liked by 2 people

  17. I’m trying to imagine 600 planes in the air above me. Fortunately, I am coming up empty. I love that second cartoon.

    Liked by 2 people

  18. I like the joke with the water hose. It is all a matter of perspective in life.

    Liked by 2 people

  19. The July bombing on Japan soil was just a prelude on what to come. I wonder what Japan was thinking at that time. Love the guy drinking from the hose. My husband did that once on a hot day and I was horrified. I won’t even allow our dog drinking from the puddle. We are too clean that our immune system suffers.

    Liked by 2 people

  20. I have no problem drinking from a hose.

    Liked by 3 people

  21. Do you know we have a road named after Mountbatten. Love your toons especially the “Yuck” drinking from a hose! We are too clean these days…soldiers drank whatever water to survive. No tap much less a hose!😊

    Liked by 4 people

  22. The pictures say a 1000 words. All those bombs dropped…
    Have you seen the documentary about Robert McNamara? I found it profound.

    Liked by 3 people

  23. That second cartoon is so profound

    Liked by 3 people

  24. You help is much appreciated, Ian.

    Like

  25. Thank you for sharing this article.

    Like

  1. Pingback: Gen. Kenney’s report – Reorganization – July 1945 — Pacific Paratrooper – Bon Bon Lifestyle Webazine

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