WWI Centenary

This is a site for the Pacific War, but we must not overlook the 100th Centennial of WWI.

On Nov. 11, 1918, after more than four years of horrific fighting and the loss of millions of lives, the guns on the Western Front fell silent. Although fighting continued elsewhere, the armistice between Germany and the Allies was the first step to ending World War I. The global reaction was one of mixed emotions: relief, celebration, disbelief and a profound sense of loss. The armistice centennial offers the chance to look back and assess its continued significance today.

This video was contributed by:

https://gregoryno6.wordpress.com/

 

When World War I began in August 1914, few expected the conflict to last beyond Christmas. Over the course of the next few months, however, it was clear this would not come to pass. The conflict, already expanded beyond Europe, included great movements of imperial colonies in Africa and Asia. As it progressed, further independent nations like Bulgaria, Romania, Italy, the Ottoman Empire, China and Japan joined the fighting.

Not until 1918 would the war’s end be in sight. In October of that year, an armistice between the Ottoman Empire and the Allies ended fighting in the Middle East. Only days later, the disintegrating Austro-Hungarian Empire signed an armistice with Italy.

############################################################################################

WWI Military Humor – 

“DEAR MOM, WE ARE CURRENTLY STAYING ON A FARM…..”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

#############################################################################################

Farewell Salutes –

Robert Brown – Brunswick, GA; US Army, 82nd Airborne Division

James Dunn – Colchester, VT; US Army, Korea, 187th RCT

Gloria (Atkinson) Enfinger – Pace, FL; FBI, WWII

Louis Gay Jr. – Edgecombe County, NC; US Army, WWII, 490 Quarter Master Deport/101st Airborne, Purple Heart, Bronze Star

Walter Haden – Whangarei, NZ; RNZ Air Force # 416258, WWII, 14th Fighter Squadron

Kathleen Johnson – Birmingham, ENG; British Army, WWII, SSgt., Signal Corps

Stanley (lee) Lieber – NYC, NY; US Army, WWII, Signal Corps

Frank Pinnock – Rigby, ID; US Army, 11th Airborne Division

Donald Rutledge – Henderson, KY; US Army, Korea, 101st Airborne Divsion

George Shopp – Tucson, AZ; US Army, WWII, Technician 2nd Class

Morton Whyte – Toronto, CAN; RC Air Force. WWII, CBI, 436th Squadron

#############################################################################################

 

Advertisements

About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on November 13, 2018, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 72 Comments.

  1. I saw Peter Jackson’s film (They Shall Not Grow Old) yesterday. It was very well done. Voiceovers from dozens of people added a great insight.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. My God. I have to see that documentary. Staggering. Gleaned from over 600 hours of footage did he say? It just brings these guys to life. Really connects us with them unlike anything before. Thanks for bringing this to our attention.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I enjoyed to read your heartfelt words about the WWI and the short video made the men alive for a moment. Very touching

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Arguably WW1 was the greatest disaster that ever befell Western European civilisation. Leading directly to WW2 was enough, but to this you can add millions and millions and millions of individual tragedies.
    And so many innocent young men were dragged into it, all of them needed to make up the obscene numbers of casualties as generals tried the same things over and over again expecting a different outcome each time.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. This reminded me of the last WWI veteran to die in Australia at age 110.

    He served in the Royal Navy and the Royal Australian Navy ( he was in fact 2 days younger than the RAN).in both WWI & WWII

    He kept his English sense of humour to the end.

    When asked the secret of his longevity he replied :Don’t die!”

    Liked by 2 people

  6. All those terrible wars with so many lives lost must be remembered. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if hearing all these stories would make people find a better way to solve their problems? Too many wars!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. What an amazing film. It does exactly what he intended.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. My Grandfather was a surgeon in the medical corps and served in France. He suffered from mustard gas inhalation in 1918 which finally took his life in 1932 at age 50. He is buried in Arlington National Cemetary. This was a horrific war. Thanks, GP.

    Liked by 3 people

  9. GP, So glad to see this commemoration of the 100 year anniversary of the end of WWI !!! Events in the USA commemorating the end of WWI have been sorely lacking!!! The UK & EU have put the USA to shame on this! Phil

    Liked by 1 person

  10. My grandfather and grandmother met in England during WWI. They exchanged letters after the war and he proposed by mail. She wrote yes and her father bought her a round trip ticket to Minnesota, warning her that marrying an Irishman would not be easy, given the Irish War of Independence (a rather nasty affair). His family never really warmed up to her Englishness, but she cashed in the return ticket anyway.

    Sometimes, people of our generation and our kids and grandkids view history as something that happens on TV but our parents and their parents lived history.

    Liked by 2 people

  11. A friend of mine happened to be in England recently, and she visited the grave of Harry Patch, the last of the WWI veterans to die — almost a decade ago, on July 25, 2009. It’s another reminder that it’s up to us to tell the stories now: those who fought the war no longer can do so.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. And, of course, the end of World War I and the geopolitical decisions made in its aftermath laid the groundwork for the next World War. So much for the war to end all wars….

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Before I die I want to go to the WW1 memorial in France and then to Washington DC for the Vietnam and WW2 memorials, also to Arlington cementary wich unfortunately I have one of my classmates when I studied in the U.S, The tomb of the unknow, and pay my repects as you do with all your posts.

    Liked by 3 people

  14. Unfortunately, true peace had not been achieved at the end of WW1. Many historians perceive in the harsh terms of peace the main causes for WW2. Let the Remembrance Day ceremonies honour the fallen soldiers, but let them also serve as a reminder to be vigilant on behalf of peace among all nations.

    Liked by 2 people

  15. Wow. A century has gone by. I want to see the Peter Jackson tribute!

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Lest we forget. As I read “The Guns of August”, I learned more and more of the Great War and this is only during the first month of WWI, how the Germans not only killed soldiers, but the civilians too and burned villages as they marched toward Paris. I could not believe the death tolls on those battles. Bless the souls of those fighting men, their families and those villagers who tried to defend their village!

    Liked by 1 person

  17. the preview of Jackson’s work is wonderful, can’t wait to see the finished product. We must never forget.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. As with you, GP, my site focuses on WWII but we should always remember the immense loss and sacrifice of WWI, as well.

    Liked by 3 people

  19. I have literally just finished watching that Peter Jackson film, on the BBC I-Player. Absolutely fantastic, and so moving. He also included some great ‘trench humour’, and using the colourisation technique to bring those men ‘to life’ was just memorable indeed.
    After four years of heartbreaking commemorations of that war, it was a fitting end.
    Outstanding.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 4 people

  20. In many ways, that war never ended.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. As a footnote GP…
    In 2008 I wanted at first to write a blog about the Great War, but then my wife’s uncle talked about HMCS Athabaskan. I never got around to write about the Great War which I know little about.

    Liked by 2 people

  22. And let’s not forget the women and children who had lost their husbands and their fathers…

    Liked by 3 people

  23. A sombre time for reflection, GP. I thought the rain at the ceremony in Paris was very fitting; tears for the fallen and the wounded. 🙂 Lest we forget.

    Liked by 3 people

  24. Much appreciated, Ian.

    Like

  1. Pingback: FEATURED BLOGGER REPORT: WWI Centenary | Pacific Paratrooper #AceHistoryDesk reports | ' Ace Worldwide History '

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: