Home Front recipes from WWII

As most of you know, America experienced rationing for the first time in World War II and with the holidays looming in the wings, food seemed to be a logical subject.

Some products  that were rationed during World War II were sugar, meat, coffee, typewriters, fuel oil, gasoline, rubber, and automobiles.  Each person was issued a book of ration coupons each month.  Rationed goods were assigned a price and point value.  Families were not restricted to certain quantities of rationed goods.  But once their coupons were used up, they could not buy rationed goods until the next month. Families were encouraged to plant victory gardens.  These gardens supplied a major part of the vegetable supply during the War.

But one thing most of us can admit, our parents and grandparents ate well.  They ate to live – not lived to eat!    Here are some of the recipes, given to us from The 1940’s Experiment .  More of the wartime recipes will posted at a later date or you can get them directly from Carolyn at her website.

EAT WELL MY FRIENDS!

Recipe 1. Wartime Loaf

Recipe 2. Wartime Dripping

Recipe 3. Meaty Gravy

Recipe 4. Bread Pudding

Recipe 5. Corned Beef Fritters

Recipe 6. Eggless Sponge Gone Wrong

Recipe 7. Salad Dressing for immediate use

Recipe 8. Wartime Vegetable Turnovers

Recipe 9Wartime Scotch Shortbread

Recipe 10. Carolyn’s ‘Everything In’ Wartime Stew

Recipe 11. The Oslo Meal

Recipe 12. Curried Carrots

Recipe 13: Pancakes (5 dishes from 1 recipe)

Recipe 14: Wartime Cauliflower Cheese with Bacon

Recipe 15: Cynthia’s Eggless Sponge (gone right)

Recipe 16: Pear Crumble

Recipe 17: Spam, Spam, Spam, Spam..

Recipe 18: Rock buns

Recipe 19: Mock cream recipe 1

Recipe 20: Spam Hash

Recipe 21: Wartime Pumpkin Soup

Recipe 22: Bread stuffing balls

Recipe 23: Apple crumble

Recipe 24: Lord Woolton Pie

Recipe 25: Cheese Whirls

Recipe 26: Glory Buns

Recipe 27: Cheese and Potato Dumplings

Recipe 28: Cream of Parsnip Soup

Recipe 29: Carrot and Potato Mash

Recipe 30: Cheese Dreams

Shopping with ration books.

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WWII Home Front Humor – 

 

 

 

 

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Frances W. Braun – Beverwijk, NETH & London, CAN; Netherlands East Indies Army Air Force, P-40 & P-51 pilot

Clarence Budke – Waynesvillle, NC; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 77/11th Airborne Division

Simon Growick – NYC, NY; US Navy, WWII, ETO, Lab Tech, Medical Corps

Benjamin Kushner – Philadelphia, PA; US Army, WWII, ETO

Stanley Leimer – Clarksville, TN; US Army, Co. A/159th Aviation Battalion, Chinook helicopter Flt. Engineer

Thomas Lynch – Janesville, MN; US Army Air Corps, WWII, 508th PIR, 82nd A/B / Korea & Vietnam, Pvt. to MGeneral (Ret.), Bronze Star, Silver Star 7 Distinguish Service Medal

Edgar Miles Jr. – Bellefonte, PA; US Army, WWII, Lt.Colonel (ret.)

Martin O’Callaghan Jr. – Memphis, TN; US Army Air Corps, WWII, ETO, 96th Fighter Sq/82nd Fighter Group, 2nd Lt., KIA

Mamie Petty – Gulfport, MS; US Navy WAVES, WWII, Pharmacist Mate 3rd Class

Dennis Seward – London, ENG; Royal Navy, WWII, HMS Alacrity & Slinger

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on November 5, 2018, in Home Front, Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 164 Comments.

  1. Thanks for your like of my post,”The Second Coming Of Christ;” you are very kind.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Interesting, I may see if I can replicate a couple of these (or maybe not, who knows)!
    Blessings~

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I recognize several of those recipes….Pear Crumble was a favorite of my mother….chuq

    Liked by 1 person

  4. wow – awesome awesome post – I cannot wait to check out the links
    and I read Derrick’s comment and it confirmed what i was thinking – I am not sure rationing is not a bd thing for a culture (at times) can stop over indulgence or at least stir up perspective

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Something new 🙂 I am going to save them all.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Great post…will have to come back and check out the recipes. just the other day I was mentioning to Rick how much I loved fried Spam sandwiches with ketchup…haven’t eaten them in ages…wonder if I’d still like it?

    My grandparents had a Victory Garden and my aunt told me they also collected string, among many other know things. Do you have any idea what the string was used for?

    My grandmother worked at the Torpedo Factory during this time as well.

    Like

    • I honestly can not answer the string question, despite having heard that from a lot of people. I can only render a guess that it would be used for show laces, should it become needed or for wrapping up the packages being sent to the G.I.’s.
      Let me know how the Spam turns out for you. And thank you for telling us about your family on the Home Front.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Thanks, GP! Saved all these recipes and look forward to savoring them soon… Happy Veterans Day. Wonderful way to celebrate… 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  8. My mother has told me and my brother about what it was like during that time. She lived on a farm, and her father and three brothers were never drafted. She went to school, church, occasionally ran errands in nearby High Point, NC, and everyone she talked to was proud to contribute in whatever way they could. Victory gardens, war bonds, gas and sugar rationing — no one (that she knew, at least) cheated, and were in fact enthusiastic about supporting the troops.

    As you say, GP, it was a different time.

    Liked by 1 person

    • More and likely they weren’t drafted for the very reason that they did live on a farm, food was as important as ammo – so the Japanese discovered. Thank you for telling us your family’s story. It was definitely a time of unity!!

      Like

  9. GP, your post brought back memories of rationing in the 50s. We had measured amounts of sugar for our cereal. If we didn’t use it, mother baked a pie or cake! Saved the post to check out the recipes. Thank you for the memory. Christine

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Beautiful bro. Well scribed

    Liked by 1 person

  11. These are great! Thanks for sharing… the Spam hash though could be interesting.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. These recipes made me grateful that I wasn’t growing up in this era!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Fascinating collection. We had rationing into the 50s

    Liked by 1 person

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