Kamikaze Action Report – sample from May 1945

Treasures from the USS Evans

The USS Evans and Hadley departed from the Hagushi anchorage at Yomitan, Okinawa on the afternoon of 10 May 1945, under orders of CTG 51.5, and arrived on Radar Picket Station #15 about 1500.  Other ships in support on that station were LSM 193, LCS 82, LCS 83 and LCS 84.  The latter four ships were disposed in a diamond formation 1000 yards on a side, their course reversed about every half hour by signal, speed maintained at 10 knots.  Hadley and Evans were in column in that order, speed 15 knots, distance 1500 yards, circling the support formation at a distance of about one mile.  Hadley was Fighter Director Ship and controlled a small Combat Air Patrol. Evans was Fire Support Ship.  At 1934 hours that evening a Japanese “Kate” was shot down by this ship.

From 0151 until 0340, 11 May 1945, remained at General Quarters as there were enemy aircraft in immediate vicinity, probably on reconnaissance missions. Early in the morning of the 11th, a general warning was received from Commander Fifth Fleet to expect heavy air raids during the day.

Enemy aircraft were again in the area from 0640 to 0654, after which we were in the clear until commencement of the action which this report covers.

At 0835 with Evans closing Hadley from 3500 yards on his starboard quarter, Evans and Hadley both opened fire with 5″ on an enemy aircraft (type undetermined) closing on Hadley’s starboard beam.  Hits were observed and the plane was splashed dead ahead of Evans.

At 0839 a “Zeke” approached from high on starboard quarter in steep dive, taken under fire by Evans’ 5″ battery at 7000 yards, by 40MM at 3500 yards, and shot down in flames at 2500 yards.  At 0841 a “Zeke” approached from high on starboard quarter in steep suicide dive and was shot down by 40MM and 20MM fire, hitting the water 800 yards on starboard beam.

At 0845 a “Tony” approached on Evans port bow in a shallow dive at high speed and was taken under fire by main battery at 5000 yards.  Hits were observed and plane splashed close aboard Hadley on her port quarter.

aircraft identifier

Less than two minutes later a “Tony” approached from high and deep on port quarter in a very steep dive, was taken under fire by 40MM and 20MM and set on fire.  It dropped a bomb close aboard on starboard bow, and was shot down by 5″ battery at 1500 yards off the starboard bow going away.  At 0849 an “Oscar” approached from port quarter in shallow dive at high speed.  Taken under fire by 5″ battery at 6000 yards and 40MM battery at 4000 yards, it crashed in flames 1000 yards off port quarter of Evans.  Less than a minute later, without ceasing fire, and with 5″ guns in automatic, the director was slowed forward from port quarter to port beam and approaching “Jill” was taken under fire at 10,000 yards. This “Jill” was shot down at 7,000 yards.

“Zeke”

At 0851 a “Kate” was observed closing Evans rapidly on a bearing of 330° relative, and taken under fire at 5000 yards by main battery. The enemy plane, although hit and burning severely, continued to close until at about 200 yards nearly broad on port bow it launched a torpedo. Hard left rudder was applied, with the ship making about 10 knots, and fortunately the torpedo crossed just ahead of bow less than 25 yards. The “Kate”, already on fire, was shot down going away 2000 yards off starboard bow by 5″ fire.

At 0854 a “Tony” approaching from Evans port bow was taken under fire by Hadley and Evans’ main batteries at 7000 yards, with hits observed from both ships.  Plane was shot down an equal distance from Hadley and Evans at 3500 yards (an assist with Hadley).

0856 observed “Val” coming in from high and deep on port quarter. It was taken under fire by main battery at 6000 yards, by machine guns at 4000 yards. Numerous hits were scored and the enemy plane set on fire. Although he attempted to suicide, it appeared the plane was out of control as it crossed over ship and crashed in water 2000 yards off starboard bow.

Click on images to enlarge.

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Military Humor – 

 

 

 

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Henry Arnold – Huntsville, AL; US Navy, WWII, PTO, USS New Orleans / US Army, Lt.Col. (Ret.)

Robert ‘Don’ Bass – Tampa, FL; US Coast Guard, WWII, radioman 3rd Class

John DeLang Jr. – Boston, MA; US Army, WWII

Robert Foster – Denmark, NY; US Army, WWII, PTO

Leonard Gamble – Waikato, NZ; RNZCI # 652525, WWII

Wasil Glushko – Simpson, PA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, B-24 navigator

Frank Johnston – Lowell, MA; US Army Air Corps, 187th/11th Airborne Division

Stanley McChristian Sr. (100) – Miami, FL; US Army Air Corps, WWII, B-24 co-pilot, 454th/15th Air Force

Shirley Richardson – Moose Jaw, CAN; RC Air Force Women’s Corps, WWII

Glen Snoddy – Shelbyville, TN; US Army, WWII, (Fuzz Tone engineer)

 

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on June 25, 2018, in Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 49 Comments.

  1. Really makes you think on the emotions running through those on board seeing Kamikazes homing in, if I guess rightly the Adrenalin and training would take over, still a memory not easily erased from the memory.
    Thanks gp.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I suspect you’re right, Ian. I’ve heard men in any combat say that they remember moving around, but it was in slow motion or like it was someone else. The instinct took over, so there was no clear memory of it.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Fascinating report! It is difficult to even imagine how it felt as these planes just kept coming.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. So much of what you post here is serious–and sometimes deadly serious. But when I got to that aircraft identifier, I laughed out loud. It looks for all the world like the sheets that are used to help new hunters (or birders) identify birds in flight. Very often, the only thing you have is a dark silhouette against the sky — being able to identify the shape correctly is important!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I had no idea Japan used bi-planes in WWII

    Liked by 1 person

  5. An excellent account, thank you for sharing it with us. I loved the aircraft recognition charts but scored badly, I’m afraid. I’m just 90 odd pages into “Nemesis :The Battle for Japan, 1944–45” by Sir Max Hastings. It’s a really good unsentimental look at the war with Japan by the USA and the UK. He’s found some really interesting people to interview. Apparently, all of the Japanese pilots thought that their Zeros and Vals were state of the art aircraft, flown by the side who were wining the war easily. Young men made fools of, just like the Isis terrorists are nowadays

    Liked by 1 person

    • Exactly, John. But isn’t that how our boys felt as well?
      ‘Nemesis’ was re-titled as ‘Retribution” here in the States. I understand he caused a problem with Australia by exaggerating the discontent in the Aussie Army. Any truth to it? was it exaggerated?

      Like

  6. Photos of these attacks reflect the detail of each account. How anything got through is just incredible. I guess it reflects the determination on both sides to do ‘their duty’.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. I was intrigued with Henry Arnold so went and checked his obituary, seems he was a glutton for punishment, after serving in the navy during WWII he switched to the army and retired at the rank of Lt Col. at total of 28 years.

    In the British Commonwealth an Officer in any of the services who reaches ‘Field Rank’ or it’s equivalent are allowed/permitted/ encouraged to keep their rank title on retiring from the service,

    So in his case Mr Arnold would have been referred to as Lt. Col, or more probably Colonel from the time of his retirement, and even after his death. It’s a rank that they’ve earned, not something bought!

    Perhaps the US should treat their ex servicemen with the same sense of respect.

    It may sound odd but a military rank takes precedence over an honorary rank given by the sovereign. A good example was Uncle Dickie’

    Uncle Dickie was Admiral of the Fleet The Earl Mountbatten of Burma. when addressing him the correct form of address was Admiral, Your Lordship or M’lord was a definite no-no. You called him Admiral, always!

    We English are a weird mob

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Whenever I read reports like this it always astounds me what it must have been like in person. It probably all happened a lot faster than it took to write it! And I can’t even imagine the chaos…

    Liked by 1 person

  9. I’d never heard of a ‘Tony’ before. I think I need a lesson is WWII Japanese Imperial Aircraft.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Sounds like a turkey shoot, but I sure don’t envy those Sailors aboard those ships. I was a “grunt” Marine in Vietnam. While we saw a lot of action, it was always nice knowing you could “dig in” when things got hot (providing you had the time). No way to dig in aboard a ship; also nowhere to go but “down” if you were aboard an airplane or helicopter. Give me Mother Earth every time. Great post, thanks for sharing it!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Honour my friend for those who died …🇺🇸

    Liked by 1 person

  12. What a timeline. and I love today’s military humor. Great line, “We have others”.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Hectic naval warfare indeed, GP. How they kept such precise records of what calibre they shot at which plane, and how it crashed, is beyond me, given the pressure they must have been under. A fascinating read.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Seems to me like if all those planes had come in at once, rather than one at a time, it would have been harder to shoot them down. Could this be poor planning on the part of the Japanese?

    Liked by 1 person

  15. I think it would be hard to hit an aircraft with the 5 inch gun on our ship. I guess it depends on the projectile.
    Kamakazies. The original suicide bomber.

    Liked by 1 person

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