Crazy for PBY Catalina Flying Boats

I thought I would revive the work of the PBY Flying Boats by Gwendoline. You just may become crazy for PBY’s too!

The Reluctant Retiree

Catalina Flying Boat courtesy of Historical Aircraft Restoration Society (HARS) Albion Park, NSW, Australia (8)

Sunday February 22 was my twenty-ninth wedding anniversary. Where I live, that’s not such a big deal. We have people living here who have been married for longer than I have been on this planet, and that’s getting to be longer than I am altogether comfortable with. Nevertheless, twenty-nine years is a personal best for me, not that I am altogether sure that is how marriages are measured either 🙂 . . . Anywho . . . moving right along . . .

Although I rush to assure readers that we spent a happy day engrossed in each other’s company, there was a moment when I logged on to the computer, and my goodness-golly-gosh, what a surprise was waiting there. My email box was inundated with ‘likes’ and new ‘followers’ thanks to US based fellow blogger, GP Cox – who writes about the Pacific War and other military history at https://pacificparatrooper.wordpress.com – having…

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Posted on June 16, 2018, in Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 59 Comments.

  1. Great repost gp, enjoyed having another look at these intriguing planes.
    Cheers.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Hi GP, thanks for the the reblog! I received loads of likes and comments directly, as well as those who have commented here. Free time and fast internet has been in short supply as we travel around Western Canada but we have now arrived in Jasper and I will do my best to acknowledge all. On this trip I saw another Catalina at the Evergreen Aviation Museum in McMinnville Oregon. That one not flight capable.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I have been meaning to reblog that post for the longest time! I can not explain why I didn’t either. I’ve greatly admired those birds and try to give them credit for all those men they saved!! I understand you’re on vacation and traveling, I’m sure the readers do as well, so answer at your convenience, Gwen. AND have a great time in Canada!!

      Like

  3. This really was interesting. I’ve never heard the name “Catalina flying boat,” but when I saw the photos, I thought, “I’ve seen that plane.” Sure enough, the Wiki article says that some now are used as aerial tankers for firefighting, and even where the plane itself isn’t used, I’d be surprised if it didn’t contribute to the prototype of such planes. Look at this video of a plane scooping up water from Lake Travis in Austin during the terrible Bastrop fire. It surely does look familiar! (There’s just a bit of “language” in the video, but given the circumstances, it’s understandable, I think.)

    Liked by 1 person

  4. There was one in the air museum I worked in. I loved this plane! One of my favorites.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Wishing you a Happy Father’s Day, GP!

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Thanks for reviving this post. It was fun to read.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Yes. What a magic machine.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Very interesting.

    I’ve always been fascinated by Flying Boats.

    When I was young, I used to go into used book stores and collect the original Tom Swift books by Victor Appleton that were published between 1910 and 1931.

    But I remember one of them was called Tom Swift and His Flying Boat.

    I also was impressed by photos I saw of Howard Hughes’ Flying Boat.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Very interesting indeed. At didn’t realize this was Avalon at California’s Catalina Island referenced. An amazing piece of history here.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Thanks for reposting this. Quite interesting article. Love the photos. Handsome looking machine!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. GP, always interesting and new posts to read. I learn a lot about things I never even heard of. PBY Catalina Flying Boats another learning opportunity. Thanks! Happy Peaceful Father’s Day. 📚 Christine

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Great post GP just reblogged …Ian

    Liked by 2 people

  13. Wow–wish I could’ve seen that. I’ve always liked float-planes and flying boats more than fighter jets. I actually have a model of a Catalina I haven’t put together yet (no room, and the dog might destroy it), but want to get a 2nd one so I can make one into a Black Cat. I saw a presentation about the Black Cat and was impressed.

    Great post–makes me want to find an aerial museum around here again and see if they have my fave planes there.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. I have always loved PBYs! ❤

    Liked by 2 people

  15. Thanks for this post sharing. Wishing you a warmest father’s day blessing to you in advance GP

    Liked by 2 people

  16. They were a very interesting and versatile aircraft, and played an important role in WWII. Many works I have read on WWII contained great stories involving the PBYs.

    Liked by 1 person

    • They had a big role in both the PTO and ETO. I keep meaning to get into my book , “US Navy PBY Catalina Units of the Atlantic War” by Ragnar J. Ragnarssen, but simply haven’t had the time. I told Gwen a long time ago I was going to reblog her and then add my article, but it never came about, so she will have to carry the burden on this for us both.

      Like

  17. Ooops! I don’t know what my keyboard and autocorrection did!! The beginning was meant to read, “Now that’s one of my favourite airplanes.”

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Military flying boats do have something magical about them. As well as the PBY, there was the British Sunderland, the huge German Blohm and Voss Viking, and the Japanese Kawanishi aircraft. I live quite close to the Duxford Museum, so must go there for a photo shoot one day.
    https://www.iwm.org.uk/events/explore-duxford
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Noat’s one of 🙂 Thx for the article. I’m in a bit of a hurry this morning, so I’ll keep it for further reading.
    Have a great weekend,
    Pit

    Liked by 1 person

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