CBI Theater – April 1945

400,000 PAY TRIBUTE TO DEPARTED LEADER IN SIMPLE LAST RITES

Roundup Staff Articles from 19 and 26 April 1945 issues


The body of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, 31st President of the United States, was lowered to its final resting place in the soil of his Hyde Park, N.Y., home this week as 140,000,000 Americans from Washington to New Delhi paid tribute to their leader.
The last rites at the White House and at Hyde Park were of extreme simplicity to follow through to the end the Lincoln-esque democracy that has characterized the 12 year and 80 day duty of President Roosevelt as head of the Republic of the United States.
A special train brought the body from Warm Springs, Ga., where he died of cerebral hemorrhage last week, to Washington, D.C., thence on to his native State of New York.
As the President’s casket was carried into the White House the Marine Band played Lead, Kindly Light.

General Stratemeyer

HUMOROUS TIMES IN WAR!

Cpl. Joan Reidinger was a “little scared,” she admits, when Maj. Gen. George E. Stratemeyer, Eastern Air Command commanding general, invited her to tea recently.
It seems that Joan had written a poem entitled The Army Goes to Tea for Yank, and although the verses went on to “rib” the brass for their take-off on the British customs in India, Stratemeyer liked the poem; hence the invitation. Here is The Army Goes to Tea:

I should like to see the captain,” said the colonel to the WAC,
“I’m sorry, sir, he isn’t here, but he will soon be back.”
“But come, we’re going on a flight; the plane, it leaves at three.”
“I’m sorry, sir,” the WAC replied, “the captain’s out to tea.”
The telephone it jingled, and the WAC with voice of cheer
Said, “Colonel Doodle’s office, but the colonel isn’t here.”
“This is General Snipe,” the answer came, “so tell me, where is he?”
“I’m sorry, sir,” the WAC replied, “the colonel’s gone to tea.”
“I’ve got to get an order through,” the irate major said.
“If we don’t get some rations soon, my men will be all dead!
Please take me to Lt. Snoot, I know my point he’ll see.”
“I’m sorry, sir, Lt. Snoot has just stepped out to tea.”
And so it goes across the world, wherever tea they serve,
This strange civilian custom that the officers observe.
But if you’re just a poor G.I., you’re frowned upon, you see,
If you should try, at four o’clock, to stop your work for tea!

 

Handling snakes, Army style

AIR SERVICE COMMAND BASE, INDIA – The guide books say, “If a snake crawls onto your body, freeze in your tracks! The snake will not harm you and will soon go away.”
Cpl. Pleasant C. Templeton, photo lab wallah of an Air Service Group, had the unpleasant opportunity to test this theory while on guard duty one recent night.
Stooping over to avert the icy wind and blinding rain of the winter monsoon, Templeton felt a “sizeable” snake creep up into his lap. Remembering the advice, he remained perfectly still while the reptile playfully investigated such curiosities as his luminous-dial wrist watch and shiny overcoat buttons.
Friend snake apparently had read the same guide book and behaved accordingly. Fifteen minutes later, he wriggled off into the grass. Templeton still can’t comb his hair down. – Cpl. RAY LOWERY.

 

Partial view of the P-61 Pierre Lagace made for me.

10TH AIR FORCE USING P-61 PLANE IN THEATER 

HQ., 10TH AIR FORCE, BURMA – Presence of the P-61 Black Widow in the India-Burma Theater has been officially announced by the 10th Air Force.
During the past months, this deadly night fighter, operating under a blanket of security restrictions, has practically wiped out all nocturnal Jap raiders from Burma skies. Today, for lack of its particular type of target, the Black Widow has been transformed into a fighter-bomber, blasting retreating enemy forces with 500-pound bombs.
With its twin engines and twin tails, the Black Widow resembles the P-38 Lightning although much heavier and carrying a three-man crew – pilot, observer and crew chief. Its climbing power, tremendous speed and special radio detection equipment enables the P-61 to achieve great tactical surprise on enemy aircraft.
The 10th Air Force’s Black Widow squadron is commanded by Lt. Col. James S. Michael, veteran of North Africa and Italy campaigns. His operations officer is Maj. Thomas N. Wilson.
Capt. Walter A. Storck, who, at 38, is probably one of the oldest active fighter pilots in the service, is flight leader of the Black Widows. In the past 16 years, Storck has accumulated more than 6,000 hours in the air, flying everything from an L-5 liaison plane to the newest jet-propelled aircraft.

Click on images to enlarge.

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Military Humor – CBI style – 

“AND JUST WHERE IS THAT GOOD CONDUCT MEDAL I WAS SUPPOSE TO GET?”

“THIS IS THE OUTFIT I BOUGHT TO GO ON A DATE WITH AN ENLISTED MAN.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Leonard Applebaum – Bronx, NY; Merchant Marines / US Army

Robert G. Buchert (100) – Cincinnatti, OH; US Army Air Corps, WWII, Sgt. Major, 152nd AAA/11th Airborne Division

Frank C. Carlucci III – Scranton, PA; Defense Secretary to Pres. Ronald Reagan

William Clark – Canberra, AUS; RA Air Force, 692 Squadron

William Flowers – Topeka, KS; US Navy, WWII

Walter Kane – Ware, MA; US Army, WWII

Fred Love – Delray Beach, FL; US Army, Medical Corps

John McIntyre – NZ; New Zealand Army # 477617, Vietnam

Carolyn Losee Spears – Westfield, NJ; US Navy WAVES, WWII, Chief Petty Officer

Harold Wilkerson – Clinton, IA; US Army, WWII, ETO, 1277 Engineers, Bronze Star

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on June 7, 2018, in Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 76 Comments.

  1. Omg that snake story though….

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I cannot imagine sitting in the dark for 15 minutes while a snake crawled over me. I would hate them for the rest of my life.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Very nice roundup, GP.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Enjoyed the post!
    I would say if a snake crawled into my lap, Id run, but I don’t know that I’d be able to! I would probably freeze in fear, thereby following instructions! (Plus, I would run so slow, I wouldn’t get too far, anyway!!)
    Cute poem-and probably all too true!!
    Blessings~

    Liked by 1 person

  5. It’s good to know what to do if a snake ever crawls onto my body – though I’m not sure that I could “freeze in my tracks. Screaming, running, etc. might be more more style. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Nice, I am going to reblog this one for you.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. It’s good to remember what must never be forgotten.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Dear.GP Cox,
    How is you?:D

    USA-N/Korea’s meeting will start!!:D
    Strong partnership between Australia, the United States,NZ and Japan etc..is important in the Southern Hemisphere.
    We must not be divided by China!!

    By the way,
    Do you know Mr.陳用林 (Chen)?
    Mr. Chen’s first secretary, Former Chinese Sydney Consulate General, who exiled politically in Australia in 2005 said,
    “Australia is the most successful Infiltration work in China.”

    BOOK;「Silent Invasion: China’s Influence in Australia」 published in Japan in February 2018,
    Author is Mr. Clive Hamilton.

    He wrote,
    “From politics to culture, real estate to agriculture, universities to unions, and even in primary schools, he uncovered compelling evidence of the CCP’s infiltration of Australia. It is no exaggeration to say the CCP and Australian democracy are on a collision course, with the CCP determined to win, while Australia looks the other way.
    Thoroughly researched and powerfully argued, SILENT INVASION is a sobering examination of the mounting threats to democratic freedoms Australians have for too long taken for granted Yes, China is important to Australia’s economic prosperity; but, Hamilton asks, how much is sovereignty as a nation worth?~~”

    Have a Good day!!:D

    Liked by 2 people

  9. Great post! Love the humor!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Leuke humor en humor is ook nodig als mensen in oorlogssituaties het niet meer zien zitten.Het is een uitlaatklep voor frustraties

    Liked by 1 person

    • Je hebt gelijk, Mary Lou! Sommige mensen dachten dat ik ongevoelig was door een humorsectie in mijn posts te plaatsen, maar ik voelde dat het een groot deel van het leven van de soldaat was.
      Bedankt dat je altijd zo’n goede vriend bent en de tijd neemt om langs te komen.

      Like

  11. Definitely one of your different posts gp, thoroughly enjoyable and entertaining reading, love the poem, and it does typify one of the many idiosyncrasies of War Time thinking.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. LOL That good conduct medal hahaha. Funny.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Interesting post. Thanks, GP.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. I might manage the trick with a snake, but for me, it would be a spider that I would have to throw off! Corporal Templeton certainly was a very cool, and brave, man.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Not me, I want that snake outta here!! I’d agree with the spider if it was a tarantula! I’ve had to laugh every time I read that Tea Time poem!!

      Like

  15. Enjoyed all the stories, but always marvel how everything stops for the British at tea time. Glad the General had a great sense of humor.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Cpl. Templeton reminded me of a time when I was a carpenter’s helper to a fellow who also did performances at schools handling rattlesnakes and copperheads. “They won’t bite if you aren’t afraid” he said. But I never was able to master that last bit.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Love the tea poem. My husband and I are probably one of the few people who have tea time at 5 pm everyday. Dinner at 8 or even later.

    Liked by 2 people

  18. A good cup of tea is healing.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. A nice roundup, GP. I often wondered if Roosevelt would have used the atom bombs, had he lived. I don’t know enough about Truman, and maybe should read more about him.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Haha love the poem, and you can’t go to war without a good cuppa I’m sure! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  21. Pierre Lagacé

    I will have to build another one some day.

    Liked by 1 person

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