Guest Post – There’ll Be A Hot Time… by GPCox

I hope everyone enjoys this post as much as I did while writing it!!

"Greatest Generation" Life Lessons

In this Final-final Guest Post, GPCox explores the world of entertainment for the troops at home and away.  

USO Dance, Washington

USO Dance, Washington

Entertainment for troops at home also provided sources for a social life to the civilians and gave the war drive efforts an available stage.  The USO is usually the organization that comes to mind for most of us.  They had 59 companies going abroad to entertain, but they also provided amusement for those in the U.S.  Just about every city had a USO center for dancing, conversation, food and getting the opportunity to see celebrities.  The Red Cross would usually set themselves up in these centers and supply baskets of goodies free of charge to the troops.  They strove to become a home away from home for the men.  Today, in the Midwest, a group of volunteers re-enact the USO and WW2 era in parades, ceremonies and living…

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on June 3, 2018, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. 35 Comments.

  1. Ah it’s lovely to see there was still time and space for music, dance, socialising and fun.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Vermaak en ontspanning zijn ook belangrijk voor de troepen en goed dat er daar ook mensen zich volledig voor hebben ingezet

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Absolutely great informative post, thoroughly enjoyed reading it.
    It is amazing just how many entertainers from that era actually donated their time and effort to the entertainment of the troops, and went on to enlist and serve overseas.
    Excellent re- post gp.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. GP – It certainly has been fun revisiting these Guest Posts of yours. I have been honored to share them again. Take care.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. It’s enjoyed reading about some of the fun times during WWII.

    Liked by 2 people

    • That’s because it was when all that old cooking you discuss was best enjoyed and helped get them through the hard times. Thanks for dropping in, Sheryl!! I love those 100 year old recipes!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. How wholesome and authentic were the times back then. Great article, GP.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Don’t you miss them? I sure do and I didn’t come around until 1950!!

      Liked by 1 person

      • I was born during the chaotic sixties–the reaction to the 50s. Strange.

        Liked by 2 people

        • The 50’s were a time where the people were fed up with not having, after the Great Depression and WWII, the new advances brought more time to enjoy things. Suburbia’s sprung up everywhere and and tons of kids running around proved times were fun! During that time, I had more fun with my parents and their friends, block parties, bar-b-ques, learning golf, archery, etc and dancing to that grand music!

          Liked by 2 people

  7. Thank you for your wonderful shares. These show the happier moments, still important know.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Mother remembers the shows put on by ENSA – Entertainments National Service Association and known to the troops as Every Night Something Awful – when she was stationed in the North of England.
    Most of the offerings by local am dram societies and choirs were most appreciated – though comedians attempting to whip up patriotic fervour among troops sick to their back teeth of endless training with no Second Front in sight were not – but mother remembers one occasion when two distinctly portly performers were signing a bowdlerised version of ‘Oh, no, John’. A colleague started giggling…it became infectious…handkerchiefs were stuffed in mouths, all to no avail. Mother and colleague had to get down on hands and knees to leave the darkened hall without – they thought – drawing attention to themselves, only to receive a round of applause as they reached the curtained doors.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. I loved this! Would that the country could pull together in this way today.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I keep looking for some sign of it, grasping at any straw, but who cares about anyone but themselves these days. Oh, we have some, we all have examples of it, but a sure sign – it’s long gone.

      Liked by 2 people

  10. Left a comment ‘over there’ as usual, GP.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 2 people

  11. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this post. “If you can’t entertain us, we’ll entertain ourselves.” – a truism of that generation. Adults and kids had imagination and with no TV or video games to entertain kids, they invented their own games, hit the books and helped out in the house. People also learned how to talk to each other instead of being glued to the TV or their smart phones. Those were the golden days.

    Liked by 2 people

    • You said it exactly, Rose. My parents and their friends (plus anyone around them) had a ball wherever they were. They knew what it was to do without, so they really enjoyed having something!!

      Liked by 2 people

      • My parents did the same – getting together with their friends and having a great time. Even back home before my teens, we were outside playing most of the time, climbing trees (yes I did that) and getting our knees scraped. Ten minutes to six o’clock, Mom would send an alarm. Our house was way back from the street but she had a bell at home connected to our gas station up front. Each kid had a code, like a Morse code. My brother and I would go back home, washed up, did the Angelus and had dinner. Dad encouraged us kids to have a good family talk so dinner was not a quiet time. We learned how to join in the conversation but also be polite. Amazing what you can do without TV!

        Liked by 2 people

  12. My mother met my father at a USO dance in 1941…..she use to tell me about the work the USO did in those days….fascinating stuff…..chuq

    Liked by 2 people

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