CBI Theater – March 1945 – part two

FILL ‘ER UP !!
C-109 at Kurmitola, India

USE RUSSIAN VODKA FOR LIGHTER FLUID

HQ., CHINA WING, ATC – An officer, just arrived at one of the India-China Division’s China bases, was relaxing in bed at the close of his first day of duty.
It was then that he received lesson number one on how to get along in China. As he watched, his roommate removed the cork from a large bottle of colorless liquid and carefully filled his lighter. A few minutes later, after he had finished shaving, he rubbed his face briskly with lotion – out of the same bottle. Then he took down a pair of trousers and removed two spots – still using the same magic fluid.
Once dressed, the officer opened a can of fruit juice and poured it into two glasses, adding generous slugs out of the bottle. The newcomer looked at his drink doubtfully, but his roommate reassured him.
“It’s okay,” he said, “pretty fair vodka made by a Russian in town. Up here in China, everything does double duty.”

__________

MGen. Howard Davidson

HQ., 10TH AIR FORCE, BURMA – A Tactical Air Communications Squadron of Maj. Gen. Howard C. Davidson’s 10th Air Force has a simple way of letting Squadron Headquarters know when they have entered a town in Burma. They simply ship back a dog.
This Air Corps outfit, the only one of its kind in the Theater, accompanies virtually all of the Allied Ground Forces to direct 10th Air Force planes in bombing and strafing in joint co-operation with ground attacks. Since these teams accompany the forward infantry elements, they are usually among the first to enter captured towns and villages.
Their custom is to grab the first available dog after entering a town where heavy fighting has been encountered, name the dog after the place, then send it back as a mascot. Since they have been in about every major operation in North Burma, the number of dog-mascots has grown to be a major feeding problem.
The prima donna of all the dogs is one called “Commedation,” so named after the boys were given a unit commendation by the Commanding General of the 19th Air Force.

__________

INGENUITY

3 new crew chiefs of the XX Bomber Command display Bronze Star Medals awarded for efficiency in maintaining B-29’s operating in the CBI. M/Sgt. Kenneth Day, Waban, Mass.; M/Sgt. William Kolynych, Clifton Heights, Pa.; and M/Sgt. Bruce Mahler, Seattle, Wash.

BENGAL AIR DEPOT – “You might think my boys were all jewelers or precision instrument men before the war. Actaully, most of them are Army trained.”
The source of this quotation was T/Sgt. Jim Glynn, section chief of the Ordnance instrument repair shop at Bengal Air Depot. Glynn, who formerly worked for an electrical power house equipment firm, is convinced that Army training is capable of producing craftsmen as skilled as any in civilian life.
When he received greetings from the President, T/4 Murray Waldron was in Boston. Besides working for a BS degree in physics, Waldron was getting some time experience with the Polaroid Optical Co. Special jobs that have come his way include making color filters for movie cameras used by combat photographers and the replacing of the original plastic washers on binoculars by ribber ones. The latter job provides an air-tight seal protecting delicate parts from dust and moisture.
Lake Placid, N.Y. is the hometown of T/3 Frederick Smith, a college student before he became a G.I. Smith lends his talents to telescopes. A contribution he has collaborated on was the finding of a suitable method of cleaning fungus from prisms. Nitric acid provided the ultimate solution. A wooden clamp to hold small parts in the hand while working, modeled after the diamond setter’s ring holder, has proved to be another time saver.
Pfc. J. W. Miller hasn’t wandered far from his former job of lens grinder since slipping into the khaki. India, as far as the job goes, isn’t much different from Austin, Tex. Pressure for production has necessitated using medical soap jars for acid containers, medical atomizers for dispensing alcohol in cleaning lenses, and the manufacture of a cleaning machine that does 5 watches at once.

Click on images to enlarge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Military Humor – CBI “Strickly G.I.”  by Ehert

 

 

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Eugene Chernoy- Santa Monica, CA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO (Borneo), 6th Army AF Combat Camera Unit (13th AF), TSgt., Purple Heart

Richard Eckert – Chicago, IL; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 11th Airborne Division, bugler

Angel Flight

Frank Fariello – Bronx, NY; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 41st Fighter Sq., Lt.Col. (Ret. 20 y.), pilot (187 combat missions)

Robert Hair – Wainuiomata, NZ; RNZ Navy # 692000, Warrant Officer (Ret. 21 y.)

Henry LY – Brn: Canton, CHI; US Navy, WWII, PTO, corpsman

Jack McCaffrey – Lavender Bay, AUS; # NX320255, Borneo

John Parry – Atlanta, GA; US Army, WWII, CBI, TSgt.

Albert Schlitz – Paris, WI; US Army Air Corps, WWII, CBI

Louis Tanner – Houston, TX; USMC, Pfc., 3/5/1st Marine Division, KIA (Palau)

Marlyn Wilcox – Gibbon, NE; US Navy, WWII, CBI

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About GP

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GP is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on April 30, 2018, in WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 55 Comments.

  1. That tale of the many uses for the vodka reminded me of my post about Dale — the sailor who “came back to life.” He was the one who mixed up the nail polish remover, vodka, acetone, and such to get that Atomic 4 engine running again. That kind of creativity not only helped to win the war, it also helped the member of the military cope personally with difficult conditions. These little vigniettes really are interesting — and even inspiring.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Now that is a different type of post from you gp, very interesting subject on the various innovations and experiments from War moments, there must be many inventions that carried over into the Civilian industry after the War.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Another great post! Your blog is more than just a summary, it’s an experience.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. I guess with all that alcohol content on Vodka, it can substitute for a lot of things. Imagine what it can do to your stomach. I remember when I got married, my sister-in-law said I won’t be considered a Morgan until I like martini. I never acquired a taste for it but I’m still here. Amazing that most things can do double duty.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Enjoyed the post, GP. Thanks.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Never cared that much for Vodka. My Screw Divers were 9/10 orange juice. Now, if there was a good Russian bourbon …….

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Great stories about the panacea “vodka” and that with the dogs 🙂
    Have a nice day, Heidi

    Liked by 2 people

  8. When I visited the then Soviet Union with my school back in 1969, lots of people smelled quite strongly of onions. It was not the local cuisine though, but the paint stripping vodka so many of them drank. Still, it’s supposed to keep out the cold!

    Liked by 3 people

  9. I am fortunate that my dad passed on his sense (from experience) of “we can make that if we have to” because it’s helped me more times than I can count. I remember after he retired, he expanded a hobby into a business, repairing golf clubs and making custom clubs. He made so many of his tools and jigs and fixtures, because you just couldn’t buy them.

    Liked by 2 people

  10. A good use for Russian vodka, as well as pouring over wounds to sterilize them.

    Army trained–I am impressed with how much training my kids get in both the Army and Navy. I got nothing like that in my jobs!

    Liked by 2 people

  11. It might be fun to do an entire series on the odd jobs that recruits were assigned to. I worked with one guy who spent his entire time in service inspecting for venereal disease, he described himself as an, ahem. “p**ker* checker”. (Sorry, I know this is a family blog) 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  12. Most interesting! So many applications for Russian vodka! I have to remember the stain remover.

    Liked by 2 people

  13. I never knew vodka was so versatile. I’ve only used it for one purpose. Maybe I should start being more creative!

    Liked by 2 people

  14. I used to clean my pipes with whisky

    Liked by 2 people

  15. Great post. I think I’ll name my next dog, Burma 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  16. Did someone say Vodka??

    Liked by 2 people

  17. I often wonder what happened to all those dog and animal mascots when the men came home. I know some soldiers brought dogs back to the UK from Iraq and Afghanistan, but the sheer scale of WW2 probably wouldn’t have allowed such things back then.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 2 people

  18. Necessity the mother of invention! Great post GP.

    Liked by 2 people

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