CBI Theater in March – part one

Editorial staff of the CBI Roundup

These headlines and articles are from the CBI Roundup, newspapers distributed during March 1945.\

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The tanned men in unpressed khaki raised their right hands, were sworn in by Theater Adjutant General, Col. Frank Milani – and the Army of the United States had 10 new second lieutenants.  In such a simple ceremony were enlisted men of the Mars Task Force rewarded at Theater headquarters for combat duty in North Burma that culminated in the opening of the Burma Road from Lashio to Kunming.

They were from eight states of the Union and their ratings ranged from a buck to master sergeants. But after the Adjutant General had signed their commissions, they were eight lieutenants of Infantry and two of Cavalry.  The Infantrymen were with Merrill’s Marauders in the first appearance of American land forces on the continent of Asia, in the campaign that saw their objective taken with the seizure of Myitkyina. Then they joined the 475th Infantry as part of the Mars Force.

Col. Frank Milani giving the oath to 10 new Lt.’s

The Cavalrymen came over here with the 124th Cavalry, which, acting in a dismounted role, made up with the 475th Infantry the component units of the Mars Task Force. They were S/Sgt. Carl R. Hill of Hooker, Tex., and Sgt. Arnold Winkleman of Brenham, Tex.

The Infantrymen were First Sgt. Rupert E. Peters, Arlington, Neb., First Sgt. Kenneth O. LaGrange, Tucson, Ariz., T/Sgt. William McCauley, Phoenix, Ariz., M/Sgt. Hunt Dorn Crawford, Louisville, Ky., T/Sgt. Willie E. Morton, Jacksonville, N.C., First Sgt. William J. Aydt, Merchantsville, N.J., First Sgt. Bernard Block, Long Beach, Calif., and M/Sgt. Valen V. Mellin, Eugene, Ore. Mellin is the man who shot the first Jap at Myitkyina last May.

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FLYING COLUMN

The British sent a flying column out from the 19th Indian Division and these troops smashed right into Mandalay. The last reports are that the British were clearing the city, with the Nips holed up in Fort Dufferin. Combat Cargo planes are airdropping supplies to the British.

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30,000 Japanese Face Trap In Burma

As the Northern Combat Area Command troops of Lt. Gen. Dan I. Sultan drove the Japanese south, British 14th Army units virtually closed the trap on an estimated 30,000 of the enemy if the Myingyan, Meiktila, Mandalay triangle’

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CALCUTTA – Eight members of a crashed B-29 were recently “fished” from the Bay of Bengal in a strange rescue by an American colonel and two enlisted men on an Army fishing cruise in which the rescued airmen were the only “catch.”

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Home Front News

NEW YORK – (UP) – Top numbers this week on nationwide juke-boxes were Rum and Coca Cola, by the Andrews Sisters, Accentuate the Positive, as performed by Bing Crosby and the Andrews gals, and Frankie Carle’s rendition of A Little on the Lonely Side.

The Crosby-Andrews version of Don’t Fence Me In was fourth, ahead of Frank Sinatra singing Saturday Night is Loneliest, Harry James’ trumpet in I’m Beginning to See the Light and Les Brown’s orchestra playing My Dreams Are Getting Better.

I Dream of You, (T. and J. Dorsey), More ‘n’ More, (Tommy Dorsey) and Candy (Dinah Shore), filled out the leading ten.

Click on images to enlarge.

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Military Humor – CBI Style

 

 

“Strictly G.I.” by Ehret

 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Robert Bachman – Wilmington, DE; US Army, WWII, CBI, Signal Corps

Patrick Callagy – San Francisco, CA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 11th Airborne Division

Robert DeMoss – Tulsa, OK; US Army, WWII, CBI

William Graham – Hartford, CT; US Army, WWII, CBI/PTO

Albert Hillmeyer – Elmendorf, TX; USMC, WWII, PTO/CBI, radioman

John Ingersoll – Ann Arbor, MI; US Army Air Corps, WWII, CBI, 14th Air Force

Andrew Kowalski – Lambert, PA, US Army, WWII, PTO, Colonel (Ret.)

Miroslav Liškutin – brn: CZE; C Air Force/French Armée de l’Air/RAF, WWII, ETO, Spitfire pilot, BGen. (Ret.23 y.)

Raymond Sinowitz – Bronx, NY; US Army, WWII, PTO, Pvt., POW, KIA

William Waltrip – Springfield, IL; USMC, WWII, PTO,’Edson’s Raiders’, Purple Heart/ Korea, Bronze Star, (Ret. 22 y.)

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About GP

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GP is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on April 26, 2018, in Home Front, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 69 Comments.

  1. Make mine a double !

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I recognized many of the songs and enjoyed listening to Rum and CocaCola

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Muziek verzacht de zeden en ik geloof dat muziek de mensen vrolijker maakt en sterk om ongename dingen te overwinnen of verwerken

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Sir, I am going to reblog this one for you.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Ah, yes — I don’t remember all of those songs, but I remember enough for the simple mention of them to take me back to the living room floor at home, where I’d go through my dad’s record collection, deciding which of them to play next. The Andrews Sisters were particular favorites.

    I found this list of WWII songs, and the titles of some I’ve never heard of really caught my attention — songs like, “Obey Your Air Raid Warden,” and “They Can’t Black Out the Moon.”

    And I laughed out loud at the “fishing expedition” that retrieved the crew from the crashed plane. That kind of tongue-in-cheek humor no doubt helped the guys cope with incident after incident after incident…

    Liked by 1 person

    • You certainly caught the mood of this era, Linda. Isn’t is great? The music, the camaraderie, families and neighbors all set on one goal, and the soldiers doing what they could to end a war – some people didn’t believe me when I said I wanted to add humor here because it was such a part of the military life.
      I love that list of songs, I just may have to get it!!

      Like

  6. Great post as always, and I especially enjoyed remembering some of those old melodies. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Great post as usual old mate, liked reading of the promotions of the NCO’s to Lieutenant.
    Like your addition of the songs that were hits at the time, they really define an era of War time past.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Eeeeeeeeeeeek~!

    You said “Nips”!

    You’re not allowed to make racist comments like that, not no more … they’re now our truly noble heroic (but once sadly misunderstood) Japanese allies. For shame!

    Oh … that was just a quote …

    Liked by 2 people

    • I did not say it, the article from 73 years ago did.

      Liked by 2 people

      • I find it interesting how the two interact (comment)with each other.
        That’s epic!! XD!!!!!!!

        Liked by 3 people

      • Hah~! If you were in NZ the PC would be baying for your blood regardless … (why waste a good chance to excoriate someone and score points?)

        Liked by 2 people

        • Free speech is dead.

          Liked by 3 people

        • Why ~ ?
          Because,
          While Japan had been silent for 70 years, China and South Korea conducted anti-Japanese propaganda.
          Books, movies, museums, statues, etc.
          Some people have a sense of hatred against Japan by taking it.
          So, I will not be silent.

          Hurt someone?
          Who is hurting the human rights of Japanese?

          NZ, tourists from Japan are decreasing, though NZ government campaign.
          It is commonplace to make friends with the country rather than the country that becomes the Bay of blood.
          We are making friends with India and Middle East etc.☺️

          Liked by 1 person

          • I hold Japan very much with mixed emotions, there’s so very much of Japan that I love and hold in the highest regard; and it is this regard that opens the door to understanding.

            Liked by 2 people

  9. The fact that i recognize all of those songs, speaks a bit to my age, G. 🙂 –Curt

    Liked by 2 people

  10. Like how they included news from the home front along with those from the war zone. Nice work on their part and I’m certain it would have been appreciated.

    Liked by 2 people

  11. Including the popular music of the times was a nice touch. Thanks.

    Liked by 2 people

  12. G.P., it’s amazing how much about WWII I don’t know. I was just a little kid during the war years. I’m sure my parents were glued to the radio for daily news. My grandmother was a Ham Operator and had a German contact for any news of our local soldiers fighting in the war. Thank you for bringing us these historical posts! 😊 Christine

    Liked by 2 people

    • I love hearing anything you remember about parents and grandparents, Christine, it adds to the ambiance of the post and the blog as a whole! I’m excited that you have found this site interesting all this time.

      Liked by 2 people

  13. Another great post. I’m trying to imagine how hard it must have been to keep track of this in real time.

    On a scary note, I am no longer receiving emails from your blog!!!

    I’m going to unsubscribe and resubscribe to email updates – don’t worry – I’m not going anywhere.

    Liked by 2 people

  14. Interesting summary. A snapshot in history. I hadn’t heard Rum and Coca Cola–thanks to Mike for posting it!

    Liked by 2 people

  15. GP, liked perusing old issues of “CBI Roundup.” Agree with parallels on how soldiers in CBI were regarded, compared to those that served in Nam. When I was young, around 8-10 yrs. old, my father still talked about the war around his buddies. It still baffles me how a faraway place, he talked about, pronounced, “Mich-i-naw,” was spelled, M-y-i-t-k-y-i-n-a.

    Liked by 2 people

  16. Good post GP. As always you share things I never knew. I will google the songs to give it a listen. I am sure I will love it as I once heard a Christmas song/carol by Bing Crosby. He was a soulful crooner indeed. Thanks for sharing😊

    Liked by 2 people

  17. Did you ever watch the TV show Homefront about America during World War II? Accentuate the Positive was the theme song!

    Liked by 2 people

  18. The Andrews Sisters always remind me of WW2. Such evocative tunes of that era.
    I like the IBT ‘illustrated honours’ too.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 2 people

  19. Love that Rum and Coca Cola from the famous Andrews Sisters

    Liked by 5 people

  20. Thanx for this a friend that died awhile back was a member of the CBI….their tales need to be told….chuq

    Liked by 2 people

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