Guest Post – You Ain’t Got A Thing, If You Ain’t Got That Swing ! – The Big Band Era – GPCox

Let’s talk home front and music on this Easter Sunday!!

"Greatest Generation" Life Lessons

The Big Band Era

By: gpcox

https://pacificparatrooper.wordpress.com

“You ain’t got a thing, if you ain’t got that Swing!”

Swing was a verb that musicians used long before press agents turned it into a noun or adjective to describe both an attitude toward music and a special way of performing it.  “Swing” suggests rhythm and a regular propulsive oscillation, a form of jazz that is still influencing music today.  There are many instruments reinforcing the others, then other times, playing against each other and a solo instrument playing against a background.  The jazz form traveled north out of New Orleans in the 1890’s and slammed into the Chicago scene in the 1920’s.

Vincent Lopez

Vincent Lopez

The beginnings can be traced back to Fletcher Henderson in New York and Bernie Moten in Kansas City.  Fletcher and his brother Horace created the pattern for swing arrangements and was the first to train a big band…

View original post 1,264 more words

Advertisements

About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on April 1, 2018, in Home Front, Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 65 Comments.

  1. Band music and dances were the main source of morale boosters during the war time era, still enjoy all the old music from that era.
    Tried to read the original but for some reason it has a fault on its post page.
    Cheers.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. As soon as I hear that song I want to start dancing. I love to see dancers swinging, for want of a better word!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Thanks for bringing the post back, GP. Nice presentation of great music history.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Bet you knew I’d be rapt in this one GP, Thanks for sharing such a great post.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Reminds me of my mother.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. GP – Thank you for re-blogging this post. It has been five years since they were first published. Definitely time to bring them back.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. This post is right down my (Tin Pan) Alley. I’ve been collecting 78 rpm records of this era (and earlier) for over 50 years and have amassed thousands. The only problem is finding time to re-play them (not to mention time to read dozens of related books). Hopefully I’ll live to age 100+ with good eyesight!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I love this music. Even though it’s before my time, I hear it and find it hard to sit still! Love the old movies that feature it! 😁

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Happy Easter, I’ve commented over on your guest post. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Love big band music – before my time, yet it always feels nostalgic somehow.

    Liked by 3 people

  11. Happy Easter, GP. 🐣⛪️🐥🐤 Christine

    Liked by 3 people

  12. It was before my time but I love listening to the Big Bands music and I enjoy those old movies at TCM where big bands were playing. Great post GP. Happy Easter.

    Liked by 3 people

  13. Happy Easter, GP!

    Liked by 1 person

  14. I spent many years learning East and Westcoast Swing. Wonderful memories! Did I ever tell you I danced ballroom professionally? Hmm…

    Liked by 1 person

  15. My Old Man was huge on Big Band. Dorsey and Goodman … but us kids never got it. Then it seem to vanish almost as fast as it came. It was era that I never caught.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. I absolutely loved this post! My Pop Yoder was a swing artist during this period and played with some of the artists mentioned: https://www.google.com/amp/s/peopleofpancho.com/2014/07/06/pop-yoder-was-a-swinger/amp/

    Like

  17. During WWII, I matured listening and dancing to the big bands. In particular, my favorites were Tommy Dorsey’s “Getting Sentimental Over You,” and Artie Shaw’s “Star Dust.”
    Grand Poohbah.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. I have been a fan of the big band sound since my teenage years. I used to have the entire collection of Glen Miller on LP’s. Happy Easter, GP!

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Super! I like that Big Band sound! It is so much better than the trash that passes for music today! Thank you for posting this!

    Liked by 1 person

  20. GP, I thought you’d be interested in this post from Every Leaf Tells A Story: https://everyleafhasastory.com/2018/04/01/dads-role-in-operation-iceberg-part-1-april-1-3-1945/

    Like

  21. I grew up dancing to live big band music at the Masonic Lodge every Friday night. After dinner (steak for the big people, burgers for the kids) my dad would lead me to the dance floor and teach me the finer points of swing to the music of the greats.

    The great thing about swing dancing is that it works just as well to rock and roll music, and now that I’m living in the home of Western Swing — well, there’s just nothing better than that music. It’s even good music for this morning — Happy Easter!

    Like

    • Same to you, Linda. I had Dad’s records on Saturday or weekends if my parents had a party. But then there were special times of going into NYC and dancing to the music of my grandma’s ex-boyfiend, Lopez or out on the island to Guy Lombardo’s band. (He had passed away, but his son-in-law was a band leader and took it over.)

      Liked by 3 people

  22. I really enjoyed this! “In the Mood” still gets me swinging. Thanks, GP.

    Like

  23. Merry Easter , buona Pasqua !!!!

    Like

  24. I enjoyed the blog. Great music back then, and it doesn’t grow old. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  25. Awesome essay, GP! I love swing and the Big Band sound. I don’t recall my parents listening to it, but I love those old 30s and 40s movies so that must be where I first came to love it. Even today, when I listen to music on the TV, it’s the Big Band channel I select. Harry James and Stan Kenton are favorites, and I love Helen O’Connell’s voice. I think it’s great you have such a connection with that period. I’d love to hear more about it.

    Liked by 2 people

  26. Great stuff! Who can fail to get swept up in that big band sound? Chick Webb, with his ‘Stomping At The Savoy’, Glen Miller’s mournful ‘Moonlight Serenade’, or Lionel Hampton’s invigorating ‘Flying Home’. Wonderful times for popular music.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: