The Final Cavalry Charge Commander freed

“Never Surrender: The Ed Ramsey Story” is a new documentary about the WWII hero who led the last cavalry charge in US military history.  This 4 minute video is well worth watching.

Born in Illinois, Edwin Ramsey died at the age of 95 in 2013. He had been placed in command of the elite 26thCavalry Regiment in the Philippines. Most of his time was spent playing polo with other officers until the Japanese troops invaded Manila.

While in the Philippines, Ramsey found himself in facing down a large body of Japanese infantry, supported by tanks, while he and his men were mounted on horseback. With no other options available, Ramsey ordered his cavalry to charge – the last cavalry charge in American Military History. It was effective, too. The Japanese Infantry, surprised and terrified, broke and fled, and Ramsey and his small group held their position under heavy fire for five hours until reinforcements arrived.

The last Charge, 26th Cavalry (Philippine Scouts),

After this incident, he led the famous offensive in the jungle of the Philippines. He took command of the Filipino resistance in 1942, after their commander was captured, and the forces under him eventually grew to more than 40,000 guerrilla fighters. He survived extreme malnutrition and tropical diseases, the LA Times reported.

Enduring malaria, malnutrition, dysentery and an appendectomy without anesthesia during his service with the Philippine resistance, he received honors from several Philippine presidents and was revered in the Filipino American community.

It makes for an interesting tale but the film, directed by Steven C. Barber and Matt Hausle with some narration by Josh Brolin, spends a lot of time on polo and Ramsey’s career with Hughes Aircraft Co. after the war.

The movie includes the usual line-up of historians, retired military personnel and family members. It even includes scenes with Ramsey, filmed from 2003 and 2012.

Strangely, though, no Filipino veterans are represented in the film despite Ramsey’s time spent lobbying in Congress to restore the benefits that were promised them.

Click on images to enlarge.

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Military Humor – 

What age Cavalry?

New Age Cavalry

 

 

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Current News –

Please wish your New Zealand neighbors a great Waitangi Day for 6 February!!

https://pacificparatrooper.wordpress.com/2016/02/05/waitangi-day-2016/

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Farewell Salutes – 

Reginald Brazier – Winnipeg, CAN; RC Air Force, WWII

Edward DeVries – Uxbridge, MA; US Navy, WWII, SeaBee, 64th Naval Construction

Edward Fredricksen – Bayport, MN; US Army, WWII, Purple Heart

William Jerome – Roanoke, VA; US Army, WWII

Harry Lamas – Mobile, AL; US Army, WWII, ETO

Cliford Naleski – Colorado Springs, CO; US Army, Chief Warrant Officer (Ret. 27 y.)

Robert Olson – St. Paul, MN; War Dept., WWII, intelligence

Robert Plant – RI; USMC, WWII, PTO, machine-gunner

Donal Sipe Sr. – Bakersfield, CA; US Navy, WWII, USS Jeremiah & Nevada

Harold Warren – Steep Falls, ME; US Army, 503rd/11th Airborne Division

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on February 5, 2018, in First-hand Accounts, Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 126 Comments.

  1. Julia C. Tobey

    Great story!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. That is an amazing story. He sounds like an extremely tough man. Glad he was there.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Thanks for sharing that post on Ramsey and the last cavalry charge in US military history, wonder the thinking behind not including any Filipino in the final Film, considering their contributions in supporting Ramsey over that period of history.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Excellent story, I did not know of it. I am going to ‘press’ this one for you Sir.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Edwin Ramsey must have been made of iron – an appendectomy with no anesthesia! I hope there is also a monument to or at least some recognition for the horses and mules ridden into battle in this last calvary charge.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I learn so much through you. Thank you for honoring our troops

    Liked by 1 person

  7. There are two lessons to be had here: Never forget your beginnings and sometimes the old ways are the best ways. Very inspirational story.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Great story to show how a rambunctious young man can use that energy in leadership. Wish I knew how to share the video with a friend.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. Very important work that you do on this blog, my friend. It is critical to collect and share these stories.
    I will admit that I winced at the idea of an appendectomy without anesthesia.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. This man is a true American hero. Thank you for sharing this!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. R.I.P.Ed Ramsey You were a man’s man. Hand Salute

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Thanks for sharing this short video with us, GP Cox. I’m sure, that’s not the last we have seen or heard from Ed Ramsey.
    Snowy greetings from the little village next the sea.
    The Fab Four of Cley

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Amazing story… Churchill was famous for having been in the last cavalry charge of the British Army at Omdurman against the Mahdi back before1900… And of course the tragic Polish cavalry charged against German tanks in 1939 and were destroyed, so it’s amazing to read of a successful cavalry charge at that time in history…
    And what a wonderful war he had organising the guerillas.. such courage and committment…
    The right man in the right place… what would the Phllippines have done without him?

    Liked by 1 person

  14. When I read about the calvary scattering those troops, I couldn’t help thinking about the American revolution, and how the British, accustomed to their lines and protocols, couldn’t figure out how to deal with the Colonists. Even in warfare, it seems that some are able to accomplish great things by “coloring outside the lines”!

    Liked by 1 person

    • And I see so much ingenuity in WWII, Smitty and that generation in general. They knew there was an answer to every problem and sooner or later they would find it!!

      Like

  15. He was a character, great soldier!
    One thing he said reminded me of when I was fresh in the Australian Army in 1953, I’d been slaving away in the kitchens got back after lights out and climbed into my bed felt something strange, thought at first it was a string of sausages then one of the other blokes turned on the lights amid much laughter
    I threw back my sheets and there was a snake. I passed out, I was an 18 year old Englishman and the Aussies thought they’d have some fun,
    It was only a Tiger snake one of the most deadly, and luckily for me it was dead, It;s head was off, next morning after I went out on parade there was my snake on an ant hill, the ants had a good fest that day.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. I’m saddened about what you said about the lack of Filipino veterans, GP. I’m glad you shared about Ed Ramsey’s story of bravery and his illnesses and what he endured.
    I appreciate soldiers and commanders, all who put their lives on the line for our Freedom. 🇺🇸

    Liked by 1 person

  17. An appendectomy with no anesthesia??? Ouchy. What some people can endure never ceases to amaze me…

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Wat een fntastische legerhumor

    Liked by 1 person

  19. A stirring tale indeed, and a great short video too.
    He had a great life, and lived to a good age. Men like those are few and far between indeed.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 2 people

  20. Very special, GP. Thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Nowadays, we overuse the word “hero” but it would be impossible to do that with Edwin Ramsey. When they made him, they broke the mould.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. A cavalry charge in WWII – I had never heard. Wow!

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Great video. I always worry about the loyal horses, doing what must be done. What a story! I tried Amazon but they say it’s out of print. Sigh.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Always enjoy your posts. Keep them coming.
    James Osborne,
    Major (retd.), Canadian Army

    Liked by 1 person

  25. What aa great video and story!

    Liked by 1 person

  26. Great that he campaigned for the rights of the people with whom he fought…
    Why do the great powers like to use and forget those who assisted them…see the treatment of the Ghurkas currently in the U.K.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m afraid I am ignorant as to this problem. Please advise, if you have time. Being as their is no ethic restriction on joining the Ghurkas, how does anyone know who to discriminate against?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Ghurka HQ removed from Hong Kong to Britain after the handover of HK to the Chinese in 1887. Ghurkas who retired before then have been refused entry visas to the U.K. on the grounds that they do not have strong enough ties to the U.K., not having lived there.
        What do these armchair warriors need…ins’t their blood and that of their comrades enough tie?

        Liked by 1 person

  27. Incredible bravery! Amazing strength!!
    Thanks for keeping their stories alive ❤

    Liked by 1 person

  28. Amazing. Enjoyed the video

    Liked by 1 person

  29. “He found himself” I like that line.

    Like

  30. Great video. It really brings him and his story to life.

    Liked by 1 person

  31. Unfortunately, when I checked Amazon, I only found two books by him; I would have liked to have found a biography of him.
    As an aside, when I was a young lieutenant, my battalion commander told me how as a young lieutenant in Korea he had looked out to find himself facing a Chinese cavalry charge.

    Liked by 1 person

  32. He was a bit of a lad! But they’re the best kindto have on your side!

    Liked by 1 person

  33. Certainly, Ramsey was one of the more colorful personalities in the war.

    Liked by 1 person

    • He sure appears to be, eh? There are so many stories – wish I could have them all.
      Sorry I didn’t have time to stop in Friday, my favorite Swabby post day – you did a great job as usual!

      Liked by 1 person

  34. https://history.nebraska.gov/sites/history.nebraska.gov/files/doc/publications/NH1989FtRobinson.pdf

    The frontier fort where Crazy Horse was killed (Ft. Robinson, in Northwest Nebraska) also served as a remount station for the US Army. You might find this article on that history interesting, GP.

    Liked by 2 people

  35. I rarely comment–by the time I get to your posts there are so many!!! I always read your stories and am fascinated and educated and incredibly proud to me an army mom and an American. (even when your stories make me frustrated because the recognition these souls get seem to only be in here–or places not on the mountain tops!) Heart your work, GP.

    Liked by 3 people

    • I can understand not commenting, Kris, and don’t worry about it. Do to time constraints, or just too stupid to know what to say, I only make a few comments per day myself. I thank you for coming by to read about these troops and honor them who ensured our freedoms of today.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Pingback: The Final Cavalry Charge Commander freed–By GP Cox – Truth Troubles

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