USS Hornet (CV-12) – A Father’s Untold War Story – November – December 1944

Another story you won’t want to miss!!

USS Hornet (CV-12)-A Father's Untold War Story

John T. Ryan US Navy John T. Ryan US Navy

The world is still at war and my father, Seaman First Class, John Thomas Ryan is still serving on the USS Hornet (CV-12).

I should have included the following photograph in my posts about October 1944.

Overhead view of an ammo ship replenishing USS Hornet (CV-12), October 1944. Note the forward antenna masts half way up. Overhead view of an ammo ship replenishing USS Hornet (CV-12), October 1944. Note the forward antenna masts half way up.

Nov-Dec 1944 – Shipping and land strikes in the Philippine area, support of the Mindoro invasion.(According to ship’s log)

Third Fleet aircraft carriers at anchor in Ulithi Atoll, 8 December 1944, during a break from operations in the Philippines area. The carriers are (from front to back): USS Wasp (CV-18), USS Yorktown (CV-10), USS Hornet (CV-12), USS Hancock (CV-19) and USS Ticonderoga (CV-14). Wasp, Yorktown and Ticonderoga are all painted in camouflage Measure 33, Design 10a. Photographed from a USS Ticonderoga plane. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (Photo #: 80-G-294131). Third Fleet aircraft carriers at anchor in Ulithi Atoll, 8 December 1944, during a break from operations in the Philippines area. The carriers are (from front to back): USS Wasp (CV-18), USS Yorktown (CV-10), USS Hornet (CV-12), USS Hancock (CV-19) and USS Ticonderoga (CV-14). Wasp, Yorktown and Ticonderoga are all painted in camouflage Measure 33, Design 10a. Photographed from a USS Ticonderoga plane.
Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the…

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on June 24, 2017, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. 21 Comments.

  1. I dumped all my family in San Francisco in June 2008 and went across to Alameda to see the USS Hornet; I believe that name is the oldest used by the US Navy, it was used on a small ship that harassed the English during the War of Independence.
    The day I visited it appeared that I was one of the very few visitors, and I was made most welcome and treated as a special guest after I told them of my interest in naval history, and how I was a volunteer at our maritime museum.
    I must admit I was disgusted with the way that this fine ship was stuck where it was instead of being pride of place at Fishermans Wharf.
    It was a great afternoon, well spent. To make it completely memorable when the time came for me to leave, instead of my catching a bus and walking to the ferry terminal to get me back to SF the chief of the volunteers had one of his men drive me back to the ferry in his official car.

    Liked by 1 person

    • What a fantastic story, Beari!! I thank you so much for telling all of this one. Makes me proud of you and our Navy!!

      Liked by 1 person

      • I have some very nice photos to remind me of that day, the best day I had in San Francisco.. On that visit I toured the Big Mo in Hawaii and Th Big J in Camden New Jersey perhaps this post of mine a few years ago will interest you, there aare some recent comments made by a lady in Pa, ‘https://lordbeariofbow.com/2012/03/03/us-navy-priorities/

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Yes thousands of words have been read and hundreds and hundreds of photos I’ve been enjoyed. We still have a fervor and a reason to read more and observe more the war is a subject that will go on it in time and never become old.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. For those who don’t know the story of ships named Hornet in the U.S. Navy:
    The Navy has had a Hornet almost since the beginning of the Navy. Hornet CV-12 was originally to have been named Kearsarge, but when Hornet CV-8 was lost during the Battle of Santa Cruz Island off the Philippines in October, 1942, CV-12, which was then under construction, was quickly re-named Hornet. It was CV-8 that launched the B-25 bombers of the Doolittle Raid on Tokyo in April, 1942. CV-8 was a Yorktown-class carrier and it was the three Yorktown-class sisters tha turned the tide of the war in the Pacific at the Battle of Midway in June, 1942. CV-8 went to the bottom of the sea after only 11 months in service, but what a glorious 11 months they were! CV-12 is the carrier that picked up the Apollo capsules and CV-12 is now a museum ship docked at Pier 3 of the former Alameda (CA) Naval Air Station, the same pier where CV-8 took on the B-25s for the Doolittle Raid. The current Hornet in the Navy arsenal is the F-118 fighter.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. How wonderful to honor this man…John T. Ryan! 🙂
    HUGS!!! I hope you are having a good whee-kend, GP! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Totally off subject, but I thought you might like this:

    Armed Forces Day march of veterans in Edinburgh.

    I hope it works.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Love this story. Strange coincidence today – just got back from taking my grandson on a visit to the USS Hornet (CV-12). I love taking folks up to see that ship.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. I looked it up, and the flight deck is over 800 feet long, but looks so crowded! Doesn’t seem like there’d be room enough to take off and land all those planes, much less a B-25, I guess you had to have some daredevil in you for carrier flying.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Great re-blog GP. Very informative.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. A detailed an interesting account of the action, GP. Well done with the reblog on this one.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Interesting as always!

    Liked by 1 person

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