25 November 1944

Lieutenant Yamaguchi’s Yokosuka D4Y3 (Type 33) Suisei diving at Essex, 25 November 1944. The dive brakes are extended and the non-self-sealing port wing tank is trailing fuel vapor and/or smoke

Aircraft from the Task Forces 38.2 and 38.3 both bombed The Japanese shipping off central Luzon in the Philippine Islands.  Planes from the American aircraft carrier, USS Ticonderoga (CV-14), sank the enemy heavy cruiser IJN Kumano in Dasol Bay.  Hellcats and Avengers from the Ticonderoga, Essex, Langley and Intrepid attacked a Japanese convoy and sank the IJN Yasojima and landing ships.  The enemy army cargo ship Manei Maru was sunk and the Kasagisan Maru was damaged.

Kamikazes broke through the US Navy’s defenses and pushed on to attack and damage the USS Essex, IntrepidHancock and Cabot.   The following 4-minute video is actual footage.

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Military Humor – Disney & Looney Tunes at war – 

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Farewell Salutes – 

Joseph Curcio – Brooklyn, NY; US Navy, WWII, PTO, USS Gasconade

Calvin Davis – Virginia Beach, VA; US Army, WWII, PTO & Korea (Ret. 28 years)

Saying goodbye to the Greatest Generation

James Hanson – Framingham, MA; US Army, 503/11th Airborne Division

Ray Hickman – Kodak, TN; US Army, WWII, ETO, 137th Ordnance, Sgt.

Joseph Kerwin – McAllen, TX; US Army, WWII, Korea & Vietnam, Sgt. Major, 82nd Airborne (Ret. 30 years)

Arthur W. Manning – UK; RAF, WWII, ETO, 249th Squadron

Ralph Mohl – W.Chester, OH; US Merchant Marine, WWII

James Munro – Melbourne, AUS; AIF, WWII, Brigadier (Ret.)

Donald Noehren – Harlan, IA; US Army, Korea, HQ/2nd Combat Engineers/2nd Infantry Div., POW, KIA

Thelma Powers – Sedan, NM; Civilian, WWII, ATO,  Elnendorf Field, Alaska, air traffic comptroller

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on April 17, 2017, in Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 93 Comments.

  1. This attack is unbelievable. No one had a chance to survive.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. All soldiers lost to war whether during or after.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. The soundtrack kind of re-invents the footage as more modern but the fact of the matter is the footage from this time is quite breathtaking in and of itself. Very riveting. I don’t know what to say about the Kamikaze pilots they wrecked havoc but have to admire courage or insanity that led them to do it. Such death, such waste, makes you sad. Tomorrow is ANZAC Day although I don’t need to tell you that GP. Lest We Forget.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. That is some footage! No one except someone who was there could possibly know how these men felt.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I found that footage riveting.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Back after a few days hiking in Luxemburg and looking at your new post. I never shall understood the kamikazes….no thinking any more but reactions like a machine.it’s not human(sorry for my bad english)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Geen verontschuldiging voor uw Engels nodig, ik moet google translate gebruiken voor mijn nederlandse opmerkingen. Ik hoop dat ze goed vertaald worden. De eerste kamikazes hadden geen kans op overleving en kozen ervoor om hun vliegtuig als wapen te gebruiken. Later, toen het een Japans leger werd geworden, waren ze alleen maar jongens die het nodig hadden om het te doen.

      Like

  7. Wow.. that footage seems unreal.. scary!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Scary stuff. I’m curious to know who was filming and also what happened to Kamikaze pilots who returned intact – or did that never happen?

    Liked by 1 person

    • I don’t believe any returned, at least I do not know of any. If they survived somehow, they would probably commit suicide rather than face the disgrace.
      The camera men were on another ship bravely staying on deck for the photos.
      Thank you for visiting, Hilary.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Never been able to figure out if this was sheer madness? courage? mindless obedience? brain washing? desperation? …. ??

    Can you imagine your commander asking you to deliberately crash your plane into an enemy ship? I’m sure some of our guy did it – but not because anyone expected, asked,
    or ordered them to.

    Liked by 1 person

    • That’s what it took too – orders. The first ones were men who knew their deaths were imminent anyway, so they took some of our men with them, but later on – it was not by choice.

      Like

  10. Heart-stopping footage and still has a huge impact despite the grainy image and age. Those poor sailors…

    Liked by 1 person

  11. I think “deluded” would be the word I would choose. These attacks must have come as quite a surprise to all of the young American sailors, who presumably had never seen anything like them before.

    Liked by 2 people

  12. GREAT post, GP! I especially like the combat film clips! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Popping off survivors in the water is considered (in some quarters) to be a bit unsporting; and we get a bit upset when ‘they’ do it to ‘us’? Honestly, some people …

    Like

  14. I can not even begin to imagine the horror of seeing those Kamikazes screaming in at them

    Liked by 1 person

  15. How difficult it must be to stop people who have made the decision to die. Sad and tragic for everyone involved. –Curt

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Thank the Again for the farewell salutes!
    What heartwarming experience.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. I saw this article in our local paper tonight. I suspect you’ve seen this mentioned but, just in case. http://digitaledition.courant.com/tribune/article_popover.aspx?guid=ba3d537b-2d33-4c5c-8d8d-20276455c0ef

    Liked by 1 person

  18. With all the firepower aimed at those pilots it’s amazing how many got through to their targets. It also saddens me to know they were all young men with families and futures, doomed to die from the start. The normal soldier or sailor had at least some chance. This was also a good post to remind people suicide bombers are not a new phenomenon, either. Thanks again for a great post and great comments section too.

    Liked by 2 people

  19. That was stunning. The big guns, trying to save our boys lives. Sigh.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. The music accompanying that video makes it really creepy. This was real footage of people being bombed—adding a soundtrack seems rather inappropriate!

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Amazing footage, well captured by the photographers of that time, those Kamikaze planes must have made the blood run cold when sighted by the Gunners on the ships.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. And the United States lost many of life , too.
    An American soldier had family, too.
    It must be hard for 。。。

    Liked by 1 person

  23. As a former US Army motion picture photographer who was assigned to Germany at the time the Vietnam war was slowing, then closing down for US involvement, I watch these videos and am astonished at the pure balls (to put it crudely) those mopic guys had to remain fixed to their spots, cameras mounted on tripods most likely (those 35 mm Bell & Howells weighed a ton) while all this mayhem happened around them. Whew! God bless them.

    Liked by 2 people

  24. Japan did not have surplus energy anymore.
    so, resisted by the last power.
    Kamikaze Pilot who were child of around12 ~ 15 years old were commanded by military.
    We lost important young life.
    Kamikaze is not a hero.
    I think that they wanted to live more.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. That video is gold! I thought I had been desensitized by action movies. The actual footage does look horrifying. If only it came with the actual sound too.

    Were you ever assigned in the Philippines? Perhaps you can write about your experiences here too. Btw, I haven’t heard of Dadol Bay, so I googled it. No results found either.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sorry to send you on a wild-goose chase; that is a typo on my part. It should be Dasol Bay. I’m afraid I have not been to the Philippines, this site is about my father and his 11th Airborne Division and the war that was going on around them in the Pacific. Thanks for coming by and making me aware of my mistake, I’ll edit it shortly.

      Liked by 1 person

  26. Those kamikaze attacks were indeed terrifying. It’s amazing how many got through the sheer wall of anti-aircraft fire put up by the ships.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 2 people

  27. Watching the video reminds me of the brace and dedicated work of the guys on the fire crews. We would have lost more ships during that war if we hadn’t planed for fire and attack and been prepared to fight those flames, clear the mess and get the ship operational again. I’ve only ever read a little about them, but everyone on those ships had an important job.

    Liked by 3 people

    • I’ve often said there are NO unimportant jobs n the military. It’s a chain of dependence on each other. If one chain breaks down, all pay the price.
      Thanks for reading and commenting here today, Dan!

      Liked by 3 people

  28. Pierre Lagacé

    Final one…

    Liked by 1 person

    • The men could never rest. Vigilant at all times!

      Like

    • “He’s hit … but he’s still heading for the target …” helps explain why so many keep on shooting, and even after the plane breaks up (in some cases) keep on shooting at the bigger pieces.

      Some beautiful gunnery there … and no, I do not feel in the least bit sorry for the pilots on the receiving end. Organic robots, they deserve themselves.

      Like

  29. Pierre Lagacé

    One more…

    Liked by 2 people

  30. That’s quite a piece of video, even with the dramatic sound track turned off. Thanks for posting it.

    Liked by 2 people

  31. Pierre Lagacé

    Liked by 1 person

  32. I appreciate your interest in history!

    Like

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