October 1944 (4)

USS Samuel B. Roberts

USS Samuel B. Roberts (DE-413)

Halsey was battling Ozawa’s Decoy Force at Cape Engaño where the last surviving Japanese ship from the Pearl Harbor attacks, IJN Zuikaku was ablaze and abandoned.  The Chitose was dead in the water.  Commander Hathaway’s USS Heerman was badly damaged, along with the Hoel, Johnston and Samuel B. Roberts.

IJN Chikuma

IJN Chikuma

When Halsey retreated south, the remaining ships had planes out that proceeded to hit the IJN Chikuma and Chokai before they too retreated.  The Zuikaku sank and hour later the Zuiha succumbed, followed by the Chiyoda.

In less than 7 hours ____

At 0750, escort carrier GAMBIER BAY, dead in water, is continually hit by 8-inch shells, set afire and floods.

IJN Chokai

IJN Chokai

At 0805, CruDiv 4’s CHOKAI, hit and set afire by numerous bombs from KITKUN BAY’s aircraft, goes dead in the water. At 0807, GAMBIER BAY, capsizes and sinks.

At 0814, Vice Admiral Kurita orders all ships to assemble and head north. At 0850, CruDiv 7’s CHIKUMA and TONE, followed by CruDiv 5’s HAGURO and CHOKAI, pursue “Taffy Three’s” escort carriers. At 0853, CHIKUMA is attacked by four TBM Avenger torpedo-bombers from “Taffy Two”. She is hit in stern port quarter by a MK-13 aircraft torpedo that severs her stern and disables her port screw and rudder.

At 0907, CHIKUMA reports to YAMATO that she has been torpedoed and is unnnavigable. Then at 0920, CHIKUMA reports that she has lost a propeller, is making 18 knots, but is unsteerable. At 0930, CHIKUMA reports she is at 11-25N, 126-48E and making nine knots.

At 1020, Force A reverses course towards Leyte Gulf. At 1105, CHIKUMA is attacked by five TBMs from KITKUN BAY. She is hit portside amidships by two torpedoes and her engine rooms flood. Power is lost. She comes to a stop and takes on a list to portside. At 1110, destroyer NOWAKI is dispatched to assist her.

After 1415, CHIKUMA is attacked by three TBMs from ORMANNEY BAY led by VC-75’s CO, Lt Allen W. Smith. Three torpedoes hit her portside near amidships. NOWAKI takes off her survivors then scuttles her with torpedoes. At 1430, CHIKUMA capsizes and sinks by the stern at 11-25N, 126-36E.

USS Heermann at Battle of Samar, by: Dwight Shepler

USS Heermann at Battle of Samar, by: Dwight Shepler

26 October 1944: 65 miles SSE of Legaspi, Philippines. At 0054, NOWAKI is crippled and set afire by gunfire from Task Force 34.5’s VINCENNES (CL-64), BILOXI (CL-80) and MIAMI (CL-89) and DesDiv 103’s MILLER (DD-535), OWEN (DD-536) and LEWIS HANCOCK (DD-675).  At 0149, NOWAKI, dead in the water, is sunk by gunfire and torpedoes from the destroyers at 13N, 124-54E. NOWAKI goes down with all hands, including CHIKUMA’s survivors.

Ship list from Wikipedia:

Allied losses:

The United States lost six warships during the Battle of Leyte Gulf:

Japanese losses:

The Japanese lost 26 warships during the Battle of Leyte Gulf:

Listed Japanese losses include only those ships sunk in the battle. After the nominal end of the battle, several damaged ships were faced with the option of either making their way to Singapore, which was close to Japan’s oil supplies but could not undertake comprehensive repairs, or making their way back to Japan where there were better repair facilities but scant oil. The cruiser Kumano and battleship Kongo were sunk retreating to Japan. Cruisers Takao and Myoko were stranded, unrepairable, in Singapore. Many of the other survivors of the battle were bombed and sunk at anchor in Japan, unable to move without fuel.

Click on images to enlarge.

########################################################################################

Military Humor – in Naval Training –

########################################################################################

Farewell Salutes –

Chester Bochus – Licoln, NE; US Army Air Corps, WWII, ETO

Ralph Gardener – Battle Creek, MI; US Army Air Corps, WWII, ETO & CBI, 9th Air Force, Transport Command

Margaret Jaffe – Santa Cruz, CA; US Army Nursing Corps, WWII1e12f2d7f401d503e1678a3a20527afb-jpglord-kitcheners-farewell-salute

Harold Knowles – Bathhurst, NB, CAN; RC Signal Corps, Korea

Richard Lonien – Everett, WA; US Army, WWII, ETO

Brian P. Odiorne – Ware, MA; US Army, Iraq, 2/82/3/1st Cavalry Division, cannon crew

George Russell – Clifton Heights, PA; US Army, WWII, PTO, Company C/152nd Artillery/11th Airborne Division

Elwin Swigart – Molalla, OR; US Army, WWII, ETO

John Keith Wells – Lakewiew, TX; USMC, WWII, PTO, 5th Marine Div., Lt., Navy Cross, Bronze Star, Purple Heart

Leonard Woods – Christchurch, NZ; RAF # 1330880, WWII, Warrant officer

######################################################################################

Advertisements

About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on February 27, 2017, in Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 53 Comments.

  1. Sometimes the sheer figures become incomprehensible to be believed, the logistics in this turmoil must be staggering.
    Great cartoon gp, haven’t seen one like that for a long time.
    Cheers.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I know what you mean about the statistics. Sometimes before I publish a post, I have to check and re-check the numbers. They seem so incomprehensible! Glad I got a smile out you with the cartoon.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I wonder would these sailors all be aware as one ship after another sank or would the Captains keep the news to themselves?

    Liked by 2 people

  3. It touch me that so much young man gives their life for freedom of their country

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Those ships really took a beating before sinking… What an unbelievable time that must have been for the involved people xx

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Fantastic article.
    I recently watched a story on AHC about the Samuel B. Roberts amazing story

    Liked by 1 person


  6. As vrea ca acest mărţişor, împreună cu primii ghiocei si primele randunele care vestesc regenerarea naturii, sa fie si un simbol al înălţării sufletelor noastre. Fie ca aceasta primavara sa îţi aducă noi speranţe si pace in suflet, gingaşie si dragoste, putere si multe realizari.

    I want this toy with the first snowdrops and the first swallows natural regeneration proclaiming to be a symbol of the growth of our souls. If this spring to bring you a new hope and peace in soul, tenderness and love, power and accomplishments.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Until I started reading your column, I never grasped the scale of the naval engagements. I knew ships were lost of course, but this engagement alone you list more than three dozen ships going down, the ocean bottom out there must be quite a sight.

    Liked by 1 person

    • It most certainly is, but remember just how huge the Pacific is. Unfortunately, today salvage crews are illegally robbing what ships are located. This constitutes grave-robbing as the ships are considered the tombs of those who went down with their ship.

      Like

  8. Really love the cartoon! I am trying to figure out what US planes in the cartoon. I guess they look like Grumman F6 Hellcat.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Amazing article and another wonderful job done by you. I can’t even imagine nor comprehend what these people and soldiers went through.

    Thank you for adding my father in the Fallen Salutes. Have a feeling he is looking down and smiling on you for telling the story.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I hope they’re all looking down at us to know we do appreciate all they went through so we could live in a free country. I hope you are having some success in your research about your father? Take care, Sandra and don’t be a stranger.

      Like

  10. I’ve never understood how the Japanese could have lost a battle 26-6 and still think carrying on is a good idea. And an excellent account, thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

    • They were in dire need of food, fuel, land and supplies of all sorts – once FDR convinced the ABCD countries to put a freeze on exports to Japan – desperation might be the best shortest answer to describe their situation. Thank you for your interest, John, always a pleasure.

      Like

  11. On your posts as on this one, I occasionally notice the use of paintings and sketches to illustrate a scene or the looks of a warship. it shows, where photographers were not available, there was always an artist among the common soldiers, who added through their art work a personal meaning to the battle scene.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. The casualties of war are immense but the fruits are our freedom. What those men and women on the ships had to feel as the bombs kept coming and the fires burning.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. What a chronology. Far removed from the hostilities, I feel sad for the CHIKUMA’s surviviors, not saved at all. Such is war.

    Liked by 1 person

    • With about 370 ships involved in this 3-day battle, it surprises me that anyone survived at all, especially Japanese. We had about 300 casualties while the Japanese lost 12,500 KIA approximately. Such a waste.

      Like

  14. A major engagement, indeed. Some of the ships took an amazing hammering before finally going down.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. I saw barely enough combat to earn my C.I.B. While recognizing the sacrifices made by today’s military and their families, now when I am depressed by the news, I read a post like this and realize how fortunate we are not to be experiencing the horrors of WWII.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. What an amazing month this has been. I’m trying to imagine the anguish of the people rescued from a sinking ship, only to end up on another sinking ship a little while later.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. A huge battle indeed, with considerable losses. I remember when I saw the 1976 film, ‘Battle of Midway’, it brought home to me just how long-distance much of this combat was. With the use of long-range shells, and carrier-based aircraft, the ships rarely saw each other.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 2 people

    • With radar being a fairly new development, this was the start of long-range bombing for sure. The numbers in this battle are difficult to comprehend – at least for me.
      Thanks for visiting, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Fantastic piece, thanks for posting GP!

    Liked by 1 person

  1. Pingback: The Weekly Headlines – My Daily Musing

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: