September 1944 (2)

Moro tai, 15 September 1944

Morotai, 15 September 1944

Adm. Mitscher’s TF-38 bombings of Clark and Nichols airfields on Luzon, P.I., mowed down enemy bases.  More than 200 planes were destroyed and the shipping in Manila Bay was ravaged.  No Japanese aircraft reached the fleet, but 15 US aircraft were lost during the operation.

15 September – US troops landed at Morotai in the Netherlands East Indies.  They were met by only light resistance despite its location at the entrance of the Celebes Sea off the southern coast of the Philippine Islands.

16 September – the Japanese escort carrier Unyo [“A Hawk in the Clouds”] was sunk in the South China Sea by the US submarine Barb.  Although no US surface ships were in the area, the submarine service were causing havoc with the Japanese supply convoys between the N.E. I. and the southeastern Asian enemy forces.

Peleiu, 1944

Peleiu, 1944

On Peleliu. most of the 6 x 2 mile island was composed of coral ridges and heavily wooded scrub which made taking aerial photographs useless.  Although on paper, the 1st Marines were reinforced to an adequate size, the figures convinced MGen. Rupertus that Operation Stalemate would only last 3-4 days.  Col. Chesty Puller differed and pointed out the number of actual combat troops, but the general felt Chesty’s argument was groundless.

As the men crossed the airfield, E.B. Sledge, [author of “With the Old Breed’], said, “To be shelled by massed artillery and mortars is absolutely terrifying, but to be shelled in the open is terror compounded beyond belief of anyone who hasn’t experienced it.  The temperature that day was 105°F in the shade.”

Peleiu landing

Peleiu landing

19 September – on the eastern coast of Peleliu, the Marines took Ngardololok and flushed out a large Japanese defense, but the enemy remained deeply embedded in fortified positions.

22-23 September – naval bombardment sank some of the enemy barges which headed out to Peleliu, but about 600 of the Japanese troops from the 2nd Batt/15th Regiment made it to shore.  The Marines became even more weary of the continuing battle upon hearing this news.  The situation was becoming a replay of Guadalcanal.

25 September – The US Army 321st Infantry Regiment/81st Division was brought to Peleliu to support the Marines.  The joint effort created the III Amphibious Corps.

marines_wait_in_their_foxholes_-_peleliu

28 September – Marine pilots pounded the beach of Ngesebus, Peleiu for another amphibious landing.  They found no resistance until the reached the second airstrip.

In mid-September, FDR and Churchill met for their 8th was summit known as the Octagon Conference.  Most of the discussions revolved around the European Theater, but the British suddenly demanded more of a visible presence in the Pacific.  This after 3 years of insisting the PTO was America’s responsibility.  Adm. King vetoes the idea, but FDR accepted and this both embarrassed and infuriated the Chief of Naval Operations.  Ground work was also started for post-war atomic bomb production and an agreement for the weapons use against Japan if necessary.

Click on images to enlarge.

An eye witness account of Peleliu will be in the following post.

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Military Humor – 

Sad Sack

Sad Sack

Private Beetle

Private Beetle

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Farewell Salutes –

Anthol Bensley – Manawatu, NZ; RNZ Navy # 6389, WWII, Able Seaman

Joseph Frigenti – FL; US Army, Korean Warmediumpic634249020853470000

William Holden – Burlington, VT; US Navy, WWII, ETO, submarine service

Kenneth Irvin Sr. – Altoona, PA; US Army, WWII, 433rd Medical, Pfc

Philip Karp – Northdale, NJ; US Navy, WWII

Bob Leidenheimer Sr. – New Orleans, LA; US Army, 11th Airborne Division

Richard Manning – Norwell, MA; US Navy, WWII / US Army, Korea

Frank Puckett – Dickson, TN; US Army, WWII, ATO, Purple Heart

John Strudwick – London, ENG; RAF, 604 Squadron

William Tice – Ann Arbor, MI; US Army, 1st Infantry “The Big Red One”

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on January 30, 2017, in Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 47 Comments.

  1. A pleasure to read your posts gp, you do a great job in putting it all together, and your cartoons are a great piece of historical military humor.
    Cheers.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I idea of being shelled without the cover of any kind sounds truly monstrous.

    Like

  3. Thank you for this post, GP, and I am looking forward to reading the eye-witness account. My father was a Marine, and I was told was on Peleliu. He survived. He never talked about it.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I did not serve and I have never insinated that I did. My about page says nothing about me simply because nothing on my blog is about me. In the information box, it clearly stated that the blog is dedicated to my father and his his division, the 11th A/B, and I am merely a member of their association. I was in Nam, but not part of the military and that was only due to my father stopping my enlistment at the height of the Vietnam War. [in fact that was the only time he did not allow me to do something].
    I have not wanted Gitmo to close, but it was part of Obama’s campaign promises along with getting out of Afghanistan. And , I don’t watch Cops, Fox or CNN and Trump did not put William Owens in Yemen.

    Like

  5. Thank you for another informative post. I love history, and you are teaching me about stuff I did not know!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Great information. Gosh my father would have just so enjoyed reading your blog. He was in the Navy during World War II but talked about it very little. I had to chuckle at the comics because I certainly remember reading them as a kid!

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Great information but also so bad for the men who lost their life.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Yes it is, MaryLou. I hope people who read just how bad war is will one day learn to avoid it. So many are quick to judge, quick to argue and disagree about anything.

      Like

  8. Interesting historic facts.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. That quote from Sledge really gave me the chills. And then when you end the post mentioning the atomic bomb, I realized that he had no idea how much more horrible war could be.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. You mentioned disagreement between the Great Britain and the US on a previous post. The first time I learned about rivalry between the two major allied nations was when I watched the historical movie George Patton, who took the glory of reaching the city of Palermo before the British. But I guess I am a bit off the topic, Another interesting post, GP Cox!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Rivalry between countries doesn’t seem to stop because of a war, and the competition of Patton and Montgomery has been made famous in war films. Thank you for your continued interest here, Peter.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. COMMENTARY PLUS ++ Sad Sack and Beetle Bailey. Great historic data… reality with humor.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Great post and validations.

    Liked by 2 people

  13. Great information GP. To your comment about the schools. WWII history is fading like WWI

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Great information, as usual, but the thing that got me today was Sad Sack 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  15. S. Martin Shelton

    We lost 4,000 marines on Peleliu–in a non-essential operation.

    .

    Liked by 1 person

    • Far too many, but they didn’t have weapons and intelligence as we do now. They did not want too many Japanese behind them as they proceeded to the Philippines. Thanks for dropping in, Martin.

      Like

  16. Such an informative post. I have studied each one as you posted it to increase my knowledge of such a time period. Thank you for presenting this as you do in bite size morsels that are easy to digest. We always grow from your writings.

    Liked by 4 people

  17. I wonder how our boys–and leaders–were able to keep up the good fight over such a long, varied war. It takes special people.

    Liked by 2 people

  18. Their bravery should humble us all. May I ask you, on your “Farewell Salutes”, William Tice “The Big Red One” was that Gentleman as in the film based on those events. You do such wonderful work.

    Liked by 2 people

    • The Big Red One: as described by Wiki:
      The 1st Infantry Division is a combined arms division of the United States Army, and is the oldest continuously serving in the Regular Army.[3] It has seen continuous service since its organization in 1917 during World War I.[4] It was officially nicknamed “The Big Red One” (abbreviated “BRO”[2]) after its shoulder patch[4] and is also nicknamed “The Fighting First”.[4] However, the division has also received troop monikers of “The Big Dead One” and “The Bloody First” as puns on the respective officially-sanctioned nicknames.[5] It is currently based at Fort Riley, Kansas.
      And yes, there was a movie made about them with Lee Marvin.

      William Tice’s obituary is here:
      http://obits.mlive.com/obituaries/annarbor/obituary.aspx?pid=183704973

      Like

  19. I finished the morning newspapers and went to Facebook to congratulate a friend who had won an award — the news is so depressing. But then, I’m not on Pelieu in September 1944, so things aren’t so bad.
    Thanks for another informative post.

    Liked by 4 people

  20. Phew! It continues in that relentless fashion. I thought I had read a lot about WW2, but some of these places I had never even heard of.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 3 people

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