September 1944 (1)

Bonin and Volcano Islands

Bonin and Volcano Islands

31 August → 2 September – US carrier aircraft started an intense 3-day bombing on the Bonin and Volcano Islands.  The Japanese suffered heavy losses of matérial.  A US Navy communiqué lists the enemy damages as : about 50 ground and airborne planes destroyed; around 15 ships sunk and damage to installations, hangers, ammo and fuel dumps.

 

1 September – the American submarine, Narwhal landed men on the eastern coast of Luzon in efforts to become logistics-ready for the Philippine invasion.

USS Narwhal

USS Narwhal

2 September – Wake Island, the most isolated post for the Japanese Empire, received bombardments from the Task Force of one aircraft carrier, 3 cruisers and 3 destroyers.  The island would not be invaded; it would remain in Japanese hands until the end of the war.  The main Allied advance was planned for the Philippine and Ryuku Island groups.

In China, the enemy-held airfield of Hengyang was bombed along with gun positions, and areas with apparent troops in the Changning areas.  A bridge at Yangtien was also damaged.

3 September – the Japanese ‘hell ship’ Shinyo Maru left Mindinao carrying 750 American prisoners.  She was torpedoed by the USS Paddle four days later, killing 668 of the POWs on board.

 
6 → 11 September – a massive naval force of 16 aircraft carriers, numerous cruisers and destroyers attacked Yap, Ulithi and the Palau Islands in the Carolines.  The 5th Fleet became the 3rd Fleet when the Battleship USS New Jersey arrived flying Adm. Halsey’s flag.  This started the air bombings of the Philippine Islands, Mainly Mindinao and Luzon.

liuchowmap
In the CBI, in China, railroad yards, troop occupied areas, and trucks were hit north of Lingling.  While 45 Allied aircraft attacked troops, warehouses shipping and communication targets in the Hukow area Pengtse areas.

8 → 11 September – Adm. Mitscher’s TF-38 hit industrial, naval and aviation positions around Mindinao.  The airfields at DelMonte, Valencia, Cagayan, Buayan and Davao were the targets.  On the first day of the attack, 60 enemy aircraft were destroyed.

12 September – Halsey signaled Admiral Nimitz after the attacks on Mindinao that it appeared enemy strength had been wiped out.  There was “no shipping left to sink” and “the enemy’s non-aggressive attitude was unbelievable and fantastic.”  He recommended that Leyte be the next invasion, but Nimitz refused to call off the pre-planned invasion of Peleliu. (Operation Stalemate).

 

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Military Humor – 

funny-fails-army-24-high-resolution-wallpaper

seriously

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Farewell Salutes – 

Richard G. Adams – Newbury, ENG; Royal Army Service, WWII, ETO, (beloved author)

Frederick Campbell – Bellingham, WA; USMC, WWII, Korea & Vietnam

John Carver Jr. – Preston, ID; US Army Air Corps, WWII, Undersecretary of the DOI, Lt. 120507-m-0000c-005

Earl Cumpiano – Santa Barbara, CA; US Navy, WWII, fireman striker

Allen Farington – Montreal, CAN; RC Navy

Luther Kimbler – Louis City, KY; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 411th Bomber Squadron, SSgt.

Donald McEvoy – N.Platte, NE; USMC, WWII

Edward O’Soro – Wakefield, MA; USMC, WWII, 1st Marine Division

Isadore Pette – Lakewood, WA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 675th Medical/11th Airborne Division

Scott Sherman – Fort Wayne, IN; US Navy, USS Eisenhower, A-7 pilot

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on January 12, 2017, in Uncategorized, WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 44 Comments.

  1. It never ceases to amaze me the amount of damage done and casualties from these campaigns, a loss of 50 planes in one go and the sinking of a POW Ship with 668 casualty’s is extraordinary, if those losses were to occur in today’s world, the end result would be Nuclear war

    Liked by 2 people

  2. What a sad story that they send a torpedo to theJapanese ship were are so much of there own boys prisioners

    Liked by 2 people

  3. i know this post is about the US/Allied successes, but, as always, my heart is with those prisoners in the ‘hell-ship’ that had endured so much only to die via ‘friendly fire’.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. September 1944 was the month the U.S. really started rolling Japan back to its home islands. Given that the European theater was given priority for men and material, Admiral Nimitz and his officers and men did an astounding job against the Japanese. They were fighting with one hand tied behind their back because they got the leftovers from Europe.

    A little-remembered story of September 1944 is the sinking of a convoy that contained the survivors of the building of the bridge over the River Kwai. US submarines operating in wolf packs sank most of a convoy which included two ships were these POWs had been literally dumped into the holds. Among the subs was with USS Pampanito. Three days later, Pampanito, patrolling for another convoy, found the survivors floating in the water and rescued some of them. Go here for this amazing story:

    Pampanito has been restored and is open to the public. She is at Pier 45, San Francisco, part of the National Maritime Museum.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Very sad when the loss of life is caused by our own military forces.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Apropos to nothing in this article (except war), I continue with my reading about Chosin Reservoir. I can’t believe how cold it was, how our boys just took that in stride. I’m still in the first 25% of the book so things haven’t completely fallen apart yet, but I’m worried, as spread out as our troops are.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Wünsche dir ein gutes und schönes Weekend liebe Grüße Gislinde

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Very sad. Each loss is great. 😦 Too great. 😦
    (((HUGS)))
    PS…the military humor brought a grin and a giggle! 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  9. My heart took a leap, GP, when I read about the torpedoing of the Shinyo Maru. Were the Japanese carrying the prisoners with some idea of discouraging attack? Such a tragedy. –Curt

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Super post, GP. I cannot imagine what the men to USS Paddle felt once they found out about the POW ship. Sad story

    Liked by 1 person

  11. It’s amazing how many carriers we had in service in the Pacific toward the end of the war, considering that we had 4? at the start…

    Liked by 1 person

    • I believe you have seen pictures of the production lines in action producing those planes, eh Dan? And the Pacific was begging for everything they received – just think – Europe was getting a heck of a lot more!!

      Like

  12. How tragic that all of those many POWs were taken out by their own. Just sad. But, then, so is war…. 😦

    Liked by 1 person

  13. The Japanese attitude is just incomprehensible to me. Some are Kamikaze pilots but others are non-aggressive. So strange!

    Like

    • Some had been ‘brain-washed’ [as we used to call it] into believing that it was honorable to die in battle and for the Emperor. On the other hand, some were farmers and shop owners and educators who were just like you and I, never asked for this war but would fight to protect their families.

      Like

  14. The map above sure shows the mast invasion. Interesting post!

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Very sad to read about those POW’s killed by our own torpedo. I guess that’s the sort of tragedy that can happen in the fog of war.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Wow, I wonder if the USS Paddle knew there were POWs on board?

    Liked by 1 person

    • The Japanese did not specify ships as we did. Often they would have a ship appear to be a hospital ship, but it was loaded with troops and supplies, so the subs would never be certain of anything except that it was an enemy vessel.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Reading this made me realize I’ve never asked you whether you are familiar with the story of Morton Seligman, who was a cousin of mine and who became entangled in the story of the Battle of Midway and the alleged leaking of information regarding Japanese codes. I wrote about it on my blog. https://brotmanblog.com/2014/10/22/morton-tinslar-seligman-naval-hero-part-i/ and https://brotmanblog.com/2014/10/24/morton-tinslar-seligman-a-heroic-career-ending-in-accusations-and-controversy-part-ii/ and https://brotmanblog.com/2014/10/26/morton-tinslar-seligman-1895-1967-a-heros-life-subject-to-ongoing-questions/

    Liked by 1 person

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