August 1944 (2)

Left: RM1c George Ray Tweed Right: Sergeant Soichi Yokoi

(Left) RM1c George Ray Tweed, (Right) Sergeant Soichi Yokoi

10 → 16 August – on Guam, when the resistance finally collapsed, only isolated pockets of Japanese soldiers would remain.  It was estimated that approximately 7,500 were at large.  Mopping up would go into 1945 to flush the enemy out.  The last enemy soldier finally surrendered 24 January 1972, Sgt. Soichi Yokoi.

A Japanese female nurse named, Shizuko was the sole survivor of the “Valley of Death.”  Wounded from her attempt at suicide, she was being taken care of by a US officer who told her not to move, he said, “We believe in humanity even in war.”  She didn’t believe him.  She said, “Everybody knows the Americans are devils, they tear prisoners apart with tanks.”  She added that she feared Americans, “…especially the black ones.”  The officer started laughing and told the nurse, “It was the Negroes that saved you!”

On Noemfoor Island, pointing to the enemy withdrawal.

On Noemfoor Island, pointing to the enemy withdrawal.

17-20 August – off New Guinea, the resistance on Biak and Noemfoor Islands was crushed as 2,000 paratroopers of the 503rd jumped and the land forces of the 158th RCT overtook the airfields.  Operation Cyclone was a success.

22-24 August – activity around the Philippines picked up with US torpedoes taking 3 Japanese frigates.  The USS Haddo was busy and even was able to claim the sinking of the IJN destroyer Asakaze.  On the 24th, the enemy retaliated by sinking the USS Harder off the Luzon coast with depth charges.

27 August – In northern Burma, the Chindits were evacuated after months of exhausting operations.  The last Chindit to leave was on this date.  The 10th and 14th air forces in the CBI continued bombing all points of opportunity in Burma and China, while the 7th Air Force off of Saipan continued to hit Iwo Jima.

T/5 Robert Kingston, Maj. Robert E. Pennington, Lt. E. Boyd (seated) and T/5 Joseph H. Hill operating on Chinese soldier on Salween Front.

T/5 Robert Kingston, Maj. Robert E. Pennington, Lt. E. Boyd (seated) and T/5 Joseph H. Hill operating on Chinese soldier on Salween Front. (photo from CBI Roundup)

In a radio broadcast by Pres. Roosevelt, he made clear the final decision that troops would be attacking the Philippine Islands and not Formosa.  Now the Japanese were also aware.  It was seen by White House observers that FDR had timed the invasion to make headlines for the end of his re-election campaign.

Operation Vogelkop

Operation Vogelkop

The 6th Infantry Division was slated to spearhead the operation in the Sansapor, W. Papua landing.  The 31st Infantry Div. was sent to Maffin Bay.  From mid-July till the end of August, the area was aggressively patrolled.  The landing used information from the 5th Air Force terrain experts and hydrographic equipment.

With the capture of the Marianas, Nimitz’s forces would head to the West Caroline Islands.  This operation encompassed nearly 800 vessels.

We must also give note of the PT boat service given on the coasts of New Guinea, harassing enemy barge traffic and preventing the enemy from putting reinforcements ashore.

Click on images to enlarge.

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Military Humor – 

pict0024

behind-the-lines-2-jpgtry-to-say-something-funny-joe

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Farewell Salutes – 

William Cary – Viking, AB, CAN; RC Navy, WWII

John Cloe – Anchorage, AK; US Army, Vietnam (Ret. 29 yrs.), WWII Alaska historian

Anthony Etrio – Fairfield, CT; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 11th Airborne Div., Purple Heart

Gettysburg

Gettysburg

Angus ‘Jay’ Jameson – Carrollton, GA; USMC, WWII, PTO

Bernard Ginn Que Jee – New Orleans, LA; US Army, Korea, Cpl.

Joseph Hillman Jr. – Rock Run, AL; US Army Air Corps, WWII / US AF, Korea & Vietnam, MSgt. (Ret.)

Edward Lewis – Green River, WY; US Army, WWII

Gabriel Sanchez – Lincoln, NM; US Army, WWII, ETO

Joel D. Sollender – NYC, NY; US Army, WWII, ETO, POW, 87th Inf. Div., Purple Heart

Henry Valdivia Jr. – Phoenix, AZ; US Navy, WWII

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About GP Cox

Everett Smith served with the Headquarters Company, 187th Regiment, 11th A/B Division during WWII. This site is in tribute to my father, "Smitty." GPCox is a member of the 11th Airborne Association. Member # 4511 and extremely proud of that fact!

Posted on January 5, 2017, in WWII and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 108 Comments.

  1. Curiosity got the better of me gp, I had to chase up the Dinkell address at 821 Proctor Way Pittsburg, to get some idea of where that postcard was going to.
    Cheers.
    http://s297.photobucket.com/user/cellers_2008/media/pict0024_zpsqw6s3xwf.jpg.html
    http://s297.photobucket.com/user/cellers_2008/media/Dinkell%20Residence_zpsx7aiwdju.jpg.html

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m thrilled I caused anyone to have some curiosity, Ian – thanks. You know, lately fixer-upper programs on TV are becoming more and more popular. (we had a lot of homes go to ruin during the big housing/banking bust), this residence would be quite a place if it was renovated. It would make a good investment since it’s not being sold for very much!! Thanks for looking into it.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I liked that story on the Japanese Nurse Shizuko, their fear of the dark skinned Americans must have added to their plight during the campaign.
    I like that postcard, very good, I wonder, out of interest, if any members of the Dinkell family still reside at that address on the post card.
    Cheers

    Liked by 1 person

  3. The Twentysomething Social Recluse

    I laughed at the story about the Japanese nurse Shizuko. Ain’t war a funny thing…

    Liked by 1 person

  4. A timely story, given today’s concerns about “fake news”.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Shocking at the propaganda that the nurse believed. While her own people were committing atrocity after atrocity. As they say: Truth is the first casualty.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Always interesting and informative.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. The little piece about the Japanese nurse really struck me. How often we use fear to dehumanize the enemy in war and, unfortunately, in peace. Another great post, GP.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Pierre Lagacé

    The scene of Japanese people jumping off a cliff in an episode of The World at War in the 70s will always be etched in my mind.
    The force of propaganda must never be overlooked.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. It was very interesting to read about Japanese perception of the Americans. Without getting into lengthy details, I would like to mention that German soldiers including their officers had a more positive attitude towards the American troupes in Europe. In the closing weeks of WW2, German army units moved west away from the advancing Red Army to fall into the hands of the Americans. This more realistic assessment on the part of German generals and officers saved many lives. I found your story about the Japanese nurse very touching. Thank you, GP!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Misconception of the U.S. cost far too many lives in the Pacific. The Germans I believe were more aware of Americans than the Japanese who were being totally isolated from the rest of world due to the military control.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. What an apt tale for our present times. Humans are often frightened of what is unknown and influenced by misinformation or ‘post-truth’. Happy New Year, my friend.🎆

    Liked by 2 people

  11. Amazing story about that Japanese nurse. Ah, the misinformation spouted in the guise of news. I guess that’s an old trick.

    Liked by 2 people

  12. Again an amazing story write down with a lot of humor.

    Liked by 2 people

  13. Schöner Beitrag ich wünsche dir ein wunderschönes Weekend lieber Gruß Gislinde

    Liked by 2 people

    • Ich hatte einen ruhigen, aber schöne Weihnachten und Silvester, Gislinde. Ich danke für die Nachfrage. Haben Sie ein wunderbares Wochenende und kümmern uns!

      Like

  14. Haven’t read the comments yet … but wasn’t there another ‘last’ Japanese soldier (I believe a captain) who surrendered in the Philippines only after his wartime boss had been located and roped in to countermand previous orders? (Damn this failing memory … !!!)

    Liked by 1 person

  15. George Ray Tweed was quite a story as well. Thanks, GP.

    Liked by 2 people

  16. I have never understood where the Japanese got their weird ideas about the American treatment of their prisoners. Bizarre!

    Liked by 2 people

    • It was a propaganda play to keep their people from wanting to surrender. You’ve got to keep the country behind your every move. When you’re fighting with someone, you sure don’t want to put the enemy in a good light. Why did we portray the Japanese as near-sighted pilots with a weird culture fighting for an Emperor?
      Thanks for stopping by, John.

      Like

  17. In the light of history it appears more and more as if FDR wasn’t the paradigm shining light we were led to believe … then again, Stalin was an oaf and Churchill uncaringly ambitious.

    Book I’m blitzing now (and shall be ‘reading for effect’ the second time, immediately after)—

    Attack On Pearl Harbor” by Alan D. Zimm (copyright 2011)

    —which when you tie in all the loose ends— especially with your revelations that the attack on PH was no surprise to (and even facilitated by) those in the know … it all fills in some holes and ties up loose ends.

    It’s academic to me. But what is happening behind the scenes right now that we know nothing about, that will cost us dearly whilst making their careers?

    I say academic to me, I’m just a spectator. But you folks out there are involved; academic to me, but very very very real to you lot … enjoy.

    Liked by 1 person

    • We’re smart enough to realize just how much we don’t know. There are people ‘in the loop’ that don’t know everything that’s going on. We can try and manage it, try and keep it under control, work around it and learn from it – that’s about it.

      Like

  18. The nurse’s story sums up a lot about our attitude to our enemies. It is an attitude that we continue into 2017, unfortunately.

    Liked by 2 people

  19. I wonder what ever happened to the Japanese nurse. And I wonder if her impression of Americans changed. Great post, GP!

    Liked by 3 people

  20. I was eleven when the last Japanese soldier surrendered. It was such an amazing story that I actually cut the story out of the paper and kept it. I may still have it somewhere. What a remarkable story. Thanks for reminding me of it. Happy New Year!!!

    Liked by 2 people

  21. Gosh, I remember seeing on the news the surrender of the last Japanese soldier. Amazing. And as for FDR, politicians are all alike. Of course, I’d better be careful what I say, I may end up eating my words one day just as that nurse did who survived! 😉

    Liked by 2 people

  22. The last surrender was in 1972???? What happened to him after that?

    I love the story about the Japanese nurse who was saved.

    Liked by 2 people

    • He was sent home. He felt embarrassment but they accepted him as a hero. He did have quite a bit of trouble adjusting to a modern Japan, so much had been advanced since the war. The nurse story is definitely attracting a lot of attention.

      Liked by 1 person

  23. It’s amazing how our misconceptions about ‘the other’ can be so real to us. Our poor nurse feared the very people who saved her life.
    I am glad that the Officer gave her the facts.
    Thanks for sharing this GP 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  24. Causing turmoil when bidding for re-election has always been a popular move it seems. I liked the story of the nurse not wanting the US soldiers to help her. You tell it like it is!

    Liked by 2 people

    • There is no reason to misrepresent history or try to erase it – as some people wish to do. What is past is past – but it also made us who and what we are today. Thanks for dropping in, Bev!

      Like

  25. No surprise on the politician at all. Interesting article and I also enjoyed the humor section!

    Liked by 2 people

  26. here’s to great 2017 GP!

    Liked by 2 people

  27. That Japanese nurse, and so many other Japanese, had the wrong idea about us. I’m sure it was propaganda-based. Seems to me that this is why so many people fight so hard against each other, whether in war or politics. Each side is stirred up with distortions and untruths about each other, so that irrational fear motivates them to battle. The result is that many people are harmed while fighting for politicians who stay in power.

    Liked by 3 people

  28. I especially like the paragraph about the Japanese female nurse!

    Liked by 2 people

  29. I didn’t know about FDR broadcasting the invasion. Just plain irresponsible, and must have cost lives. Shocking indeed.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 2 people

  30. I won’t be your only reader who remembers that 1972 surrender

    Liked by 2 people

  31. I find the fact the last Japanese soldier didn’t surrender until 1972 fascinating!

    Liked by 2 people

  32. Another interesting story about the war. You are a good writer making it exciting to read

    Liked by 2 people

  33. Filling the collective head with propaganda – timing an invasion to help support an election bid – we never learn from history…or, maybe only some people do. 800 ships in a battle group? That is hard to even imagine. You could probably see that from space.

    Liked by 4 people

  34. I do enjoy the humor you add here. The envelope today is especially funny — and I did have to smile at FDR timing an invasion to complement his re-election campaign. Some things never change!

    Liked by 2 people

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